Main Nav

Why TechQual+?

Later this week I’ll be delivering a three-hour online workshop on how to use the Higher Education TechQual+ Project survey and Web site tools. The survey and tools are available free of charge for assessing the quality of IT services on college or university campuses. The first question we’ll cover is “Why TechQual+?” Or, why should IT leaders use a standardized survey for gauging IT service quality?

The TechQual+ Survey for 2015

The Higher Education TechQual+ Project aims to produce a standard, generalizable survey that assesses the quality of IT services in higher education from the perspective of students, faculty, and staff. Each year the TechQual+ core survey is updated based on feedback from respondents and the community of participating institutions. This year's update was finalized over this past weekend is now available for schools to administer through the Higher Education TechQual+ Web site.
 
The survey is organized in three sections, focusing on Internet access, online services, and user support. The format and approach of the survey is based on SERVQUAL which has strong support in the academic literature for assessing customer satisfaction.

Updates to the Core TechQual+ Survey for 2015

The Higher Education TechQual+ Project is a research project that develops tools to help IT leaders create a culture of continuous improvement for their organizations. More information on the TechQual+ project can be found at http://www.techqual.org on the Web.
 
The project provides the following: a common survey instrument that defines effective IT technology services from the perspective of those outside the IT organization; a set of easy-to-use Web-based tools that allow IT leaders to create surveys and analyze data collected from students, faculty, and staff; and a peer database that allows for comparisons of IT service quality against the performance of other institutions. These tools are available free of charge to participating institutions. 
 
Each year provides the opportunity to assess the quality of the current core TechQual+ survey and make improvements.

Tags from the EDUCAUSE Library

Thursday's Hawkins Leadership Roundtable Agenda

On Thursday morning roundtable members and participants will convene together at 7:30am in room 209 A/C in the Orlando Conference center. This is the last meeting of the roundtable for 2014 and we hope that you have found our time together extremely beneficial. Our breakfast meeting will include remarks and some question time with Nancy Zimpher, the Chancellor of the State University of New York System, who will also be delivering the final keynote of the conference at 10:15 am.
 
Participants are asked to please fill out the evaluation form for the roundtable. Your feedback is essential to improving the roundtable for next year’s participants. We look forward to receiving your comments and suggestions.
 
About the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable: The Hawkins Leadership Roundtable is a leadership development program for new CIOs and individuals actively seeking a CIO role.

Wednesday's Hawkins Leadership Roundtable Agenda

Tomorrow’s Hawkins Leadership Roundtable activities will continue to connect participants with council members in ways that focus on developing participants’ leadership capabilities and elevating the work of their organizations.
 
The links for Tuesday’s slide presentation can be found here: http://bit.ly/1pEqErt
 
Wednesday’s lunch will begin at 11:30 am in room W209 A/B in the Orlando conference center. During this session the council will focus on the topic of “conversations with presidents or senior executives.” During this session, each council member will play the role of an institutional president and role-play with participants using questions commonly asked of CIOs by senior executives.

Tuesday's Hawkins Leadership Roundtable Agenda

EDUCAUSE 2014 is here and the first meeting of the entire Hawkins Leadership Roundtable kicks off today at 12:30pm in room W209 A/B in the Orlando Conference center. Though this is the first time that the council will meet together as a group, participants should have already scheduled some time with their assigned Council members who will act as their mentors for the program. Many participants will have met with their mentor yesterday or today before the first lunch. As a council member myself I am meeting with my first protégé before Tuesday's lunch.
 
It’s up to the participants in the program to contact their assigned Council member for mentoring activities. This one-on-one collaboration is one of the most important benefits of the Hawkins Leadership Roundtable.

Gratitude

[grat-i-tood, -tyood]
noun 
 
  1. the quality or feeling of being grateful or thankful, as in "He expressed his gratitude to everyone who worked so hard."
 
Regardless of how many ERP implementations one has under one's belt, you’re never quite prepared for the stress and emotional roller coaster that ensues when you are racing towards go-lives, working through disagreements on how to reduce scope to make deadlines, validating conversion data that are not even close to being clean, preparing business offices across campus for the substantial changes they don’t see coming, and explaining to executives why these projects are so difficult, so expensive, and how all of that has very little to do with the technology itself.
 
But we did it.
 
I think the most amazing thing that has been accomplished at the University of Geo

Completing the Circle

As IT leaders, our singular focus shouldn’t be to partner with the business or to align our work with the strategic goals of the enterprise; it should be to develop our staff into business professionals who add value through the use of technology. If we do that, both partnerships and alignment become givens. If our profession is to complete this circle of transformation, we have to dramatically rethink our approach regarding the professional development of the IT staff working throughout our organizations.
 
Advances in technology, including the wide availability of cloud services, now allow us to shift our organizational focus away from the care and feeding of technology to the intersection of people, business needs, and the imperative to add value in whatever we do. Technicians focus on technical skills and the delivery of technology as the essential ingredients for personal and professional success.

Scale

If you’re a CIO or other senior level IT leader and you’re not actively looking to get out of the IT business, chances are you’re not doing your job right.
 
Economic challenges are driving systematic changes in higher education. Some might call it outsourcing and others might refer to it as shared services. For far too many, those words can refer to a loss of control and autonomy that appears disruptive to organizations, as it potentially leads to the loss of both service quality and jobs. At the University of Texas, over 100 faculty members signed a petition objecting to a University plan to consolidate common administrative functions – IT included – in order to save millions of dollars annually.

The Flinch and Other Traps

Everything that IT leaders do involves a negotiation in one way or another. Yet, focusing on negotiation skills is one of the last things we do when thinking about the professional development needs of our organizations.

Once, while thumbing through a magazine on a cross-country flight, I noticed an advertisement featuring a very distinguished-looking gentleman named Chester Karrass, whose testimonial stated, “In business as in life, you don’t get what you deserve; you get what you negotiate.” Seeing this ad several times before, I decided “why not” and signed up for a Karrass negotiating seminar. While the content of the workshop was predominantly focused on buying and selling, what stuck with me was how applicable it was to the negotiations regarding the expectations and resources that IT leaders face every day.