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Why MOOCs are like Farmville, Part II

On January 18th, I laid out my concerns with Massively Open Online Courses (MOOCs), understanding their rapid ascent within the confines of Gartner’s Hype Cycle. In doing so, my purpose was to suggest that the true innovations posed by MOOCs will be much different than what is commonly presumed. Ultimately, as MOOCs descend from the peak of inflated expectations, down through the trough of disillusionment, and onto a plateau of productivity, their impact will be less about the wholesale transformation of higher education and more about advancements in modes of learning that will decenter the learning process away from the traditional classroom lecture and empower students as both consumers and creators of knowledge. Simply put, the “Sage on the Stage” model of higher education ceases as the role of traditional gatekeepers are eroded and replaced with patterns of collaboration based on a “many to many” model. The traditional classroom lecture, rightfully so, is the first to go.
 
Along with the classroom lecture, traditional notions of teaching also change, primarily those that presume a gatekeeping role for teachers as the authoritative center of the learning process. As relationships between students and faculty shift from a “one-to-many” model of collaboration, power will be increasingly shared on an equal basis between them. Teaching becomes less about conveying information and more about stewarding a set of experiences and collaborations, which become the means by which higher learning occurs. Some models consistent with this shift include the following.
 
  • Collaborative Learning. This model presumes that there is an inherent social nature to learning, and that learning is best facilitated through a set of shared experiences between participants. Types of experiences include group projects, engaging in common tasks, face-to-face conversations, as well as those mediated by technology (including social networks, discussion forums, etc.). Equitable sharing of power among all participants, including those stewarding the collaboration, is critical for this model of learning.
 
  • Service Learning. This model focuses on providing students with a set of applied experiences which complements and extends the consumption of information obtained through regular instruction or self-study. As a form of experiential education, this model presumes that learning requires that content, whether produced or consumed, be reinforced by direct experience. 
 
  • Undergraduate Research Programs. By engaging students in the process of research, learning becomes more about the processes of discovery and innovation and less about the mastery of content. By teaching students the processes by which knowledge is created, students are provided a set of experiences that spark creativity and critical thinking, and that prepare students for lifelong learning.
 
Just reading this list, one may wonder whether these newer forms of learning fully represent changes made possible by the Internet. But beyond the technology, change is ultimately a social experience, and the most lasting impact of the Internet is on the nature of collaboration and social relationships between individuals. As higher education embraces these possibilities, the importance of the relationship between faculty and students has never been more critical. New models of learning are centered on collaboration, experience, and the production of knowledge. These processes have been and should continue to be the center of what a higher education is all about.
 

Comments

The MOOC thing...ya, that is hot at the moment.  Please take a look at my thoughts on the following blog. 

Jason T. Hudnut

http://hapaziz.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/the-mooc-that-fits-will-be-the-mooc-that-survives/

The MOOC format is certainly a prevalent way of learning more so than it used to be. How are faculty members who are more traditional in the lecture-format approach responding to these changes?

either way i do think moocs are good for our society, it opens up education and that's always a good thing.

I don't know, I'm a little pessimistic about MOOCs. I feel like they ascended rapidly just to quiet down any student revolt from higher tuitions and long wait time for class openings. In away keep the want to be students busy with some free classes while they wait in line to pay for the real class.

they can also be seen as training wheels for non-tech savvy adult students who don't really know much about elearning and distance education that they have to actually search for their lms portal login page.

on the bright side they can be seen as a preview to the main course helping student save time and money once the realize the class isn't for them.

 

That is a good point

Should I believe that MOCC will take over Blackboard? 

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