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Hello all – we are in the very early stages of addressing two of the initiatives identified as most needed by our first-round EA exercise last year. The first is that of managing non-credit activities – continuing studies courses, continuing medical/dental education offerings, seminars, conferences, HR professional development and so on. The second is customer/student relationship management – really an essential component of the first for the units who market their activities to the community and a critical need for our Enrollment Services shared services center.

 

I’d very much like to hear from any of you who’ve already been down that road or are about to embark on a related journey.

 

Thanks

Shelly Feran

Enterprise Architect

Information Technology Services

McGill University

514-398-4444; shelly.feran@mcgill.ca

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from niederhp@gmail.com

Shelly,

I've been occasionally involved in these issues in the past few years at Georgetown. From an architecture perspective, some of the key challenges that we saw were:
  • The traditional student information system (although ours was just replaced) isn't really geared toward "non-traditional" activities in which there are many types of offerings; neither the offerings nor the students follow traditional academic calendars, matriculation cycles, or a concept of "academic program"; there isn't necessarily an admissions process; there may not be graduation dates; a traditional transcript isn't necessarily relevant; and so forth.
  • The traditional student information system also isn't really geared toward content management for marketing (despite vendor efforts); usually it's barely sufficient for traditional students to find and enroll in courses, much less for non-traditional students to browse offerings, to promote offerings, to conduct marketing campaigns around offerings, and so forth.
  • The non-traditional offerings usually involve e-commerce, and that's an area that's not highly developed at most institutions.
  • Integrating non-traditional students in enterprise identity management can be a challenge; enterprise IDM was probably designed for traditional students and employees, not for a relatively accelerated life cycle in which a user gets an identity instantly, then progresses through increased levels of assurance, or on the other hand may never use the identity again.
  • The offices charged with setting up non-traditional offerings don't necessarily have enough expertise in designing a high quality online experience.

That's setting aside the substantial management, financial, and organizational maturity challenges, of course.

At the time I was involved we were implementing Talisma and doing substantial customization around it. That's what drives much of School of Continuing Studies site:

http://scs.georgetown.edu/

Regards,

Piet


Message from klhanso2@em.wisc.edu

Hi Shelly and Piet-

 

This topic is very timely as we have re-started discussions about using our enterprise student information system to track non-credit activity. 

The challenges that Piet has described are similar challenges for our institution as well.  We are motivated, however, by the absence of identity management for the non-credit population who when on campus or using the same services as ‘for credit’ students don’t feel they are any different and service providers don’t know how to separate them as well.  Often times continuing non-credit learners are degreed alumni and are disconnected to the student experience they once had and desire to have again.

Therefore, we are beginning discussions again around how we can be more efficient as an institution and use resources already available.  It is agreed that the student information system may not be a perfect fit, especially with the interface to register and pay for a non-credit experience, but we hope there are more fits than gaps.  At least we will give it the old college try!  I would be interested in chatting with others as well who are engaging in this effort, thinking of it, or tried it and gave up.

 

Best,
Karen Hanson, Associate Registrar
Office of the Registrar-Enrollment Services
University of Wisconsin-Madison
(608) 262-3711
klhanso2@em.wisc.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITANA Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Piet Niederhausen
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:10 PM
To: ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITANA] Non-credit activity managment and CRM advice, experiences?

 

Shelly,

I've been occasionally involved in these issues in the past few years at Georgetown. From an architecture perspective, some of the key challenges that we saw were:

  • The traditional student information system (although ours was just replaced) isn't really geared toward "non-traditional" activities in which there are many types of offerings; neither the offerings nor the students follow traditional academic calendars, matriculation cycles, or a concept of "academic program"; there isn't necessarily an admissions process; there may not be graduation dates; a traditional transcript isn't necessarily relevant; and so forth.
  • The traditional student information system also isn't really geared toward content management for marketing (despite vendor efforts); usually it's barely sufficient for traditional students to find and enroll in courses, much less for non-traditional students to browse offerings, to promote offerings, to conduct marketing campaigns around offerings, and so forth.
  • The non-traditional offerings usually involve e-commerce, and that's an area that's not highly developed at most institutions.
  • Integrating non-traditional students in enterprise identity management can be a challenge; enterprise IDM was probably designed for traditional students and employees, not for a relatively accelerated life cycle in which a user gets an identity instantly, then progresses through increased levels of assurance, or on the other hand may never use the identity again.
  • The offices charged with setting up non-traditional offerings don't necessarily have enough expertise in designing a high quality online experience.

That's setting aside the substantial management, financial, and organizational maturity challenges, of course.

At the time I was involved we were implementing Talisma and doing substantial customization around it. That's what drives much of School of Continuing Studies site:

http://scs.georgetown.edu/

Regards,

Piet

 

HI Karen – several of our units have made use of the student information system, which is SungardHE Banner, with varying degrees of success. SungardHE does have a new offering, Flexible Registration, geared to Continuing Studies departments, but we don’t have that and were trying to use “quick start” and “open learning” features.  Most of the problems reported by units during our recent needs gathering exercise were the ones predicted by Piet’s great summary of the challenges:

-          Participants being able to find offerings easily

-          Getting them into the system in the absence of a traditional admission process – often having to involve  admin staff entering data at a counter

-          Payment and finance – built for traditional admission, student accounts

 

That being said, our Continuing Studies faculty does manage a significant percentage of their courses with Banner SIS.

 

Regards

Shelly Feran

Enterprise Architect
Information Technology Services, McGill University

Shelly.feran@mcgill.ca; 514-398-4444

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITANA Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Karen Hanson
Sent: Monday, February 20, 2012 1:29 PM
To: ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITANA] Non-credit activity managment and CRM advice, experiences?

 

Hi Shelly and Piet-

 

This topic is very timely as we have re-started discussions about using our enterprise student information system to track non-credit activity. 

The challenges that Piet has described are similar challenges for our institution as well.  We are motivated, however, by the absence of identity management for the non-credit population who when on campus or using the same services as ‘for credit’ students don’t feel they are any different and service providers don’t know how to separate them as well.  Often times continuing non-credit learners are degreed alumni and are disconnected to the student experience they once had and desire to have again.

Therefore, we are beginning discussions again around how we can be more efficient as an institution and use resources already available.  It is agreed that the student information system may not be a perfect fit, especially with the interface to register and pay for a non-credit experience, but we hope there are more fits than gaps.  At least we will give it the old college try!  I would be interested in chatting with others as well who are engaging in this effort, thinking of it, or tried it and gave up.

 

Best,
Karen Hanson, Associate Registrar
Office of the Registrar-Enrollment Services
University of Wisconsin-Madison
(608) 262-3711
klhanso2@em.wisc.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE ITANA Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Piet Niederhausen
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:10 PM
To: ITANA@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [ITANA] Non-credit activity managment and CRM advice, experiences?

 

Shelly,

I've been occasionally involved in these issues in the past few years at Georgetown. From an architecture perspective, some of the key challenges that we saw were:

  • The traditional student information system (although ours was just replaced) isn't really geared toward "non-traditional" activities in which there are many types of offerings; neither the offerings nor the students follow traditional academic calendars, matriculation cycles, or a concept of "academic program"; there isn't necessarily an admissions process; there may not be graduation dates; a traditional transcript isn't necessarily relevant; and so forth.
  • The traditional student information system also isn't really geared toward content management for marketing (despite vendor efforts); usually it's barely sufficient for traditional students to find and enroll in courses, much less for non-traditional students to browse offerings, to promote offerings, to conduct marketing campaigns around offerings, and so forth.
  • The non-traditional offerings usually involve e-commerce, and that's an area that's not highly developed at most institutions.
  • Integrating non-traditional students in enterprise identity management can be a challenge; enterprise IDM was probably designed for traditional students and employees, not for a relatively accelerated life cycle in which a user gets an identity instantly, then progresses through increased levels of assurance, or on the other hand may never use the identity again.
  • The offices charged with setting up non-traditional offerings don't necessarily have enough expertise in designing a high quality online experience.

That's setting aside the substantial management, financial, and organizational maturity challenges, of course.

At the time I was involved we were implementing Talisma and doing substantial customization around it. That's what drives much of School of Continuing Studies site:

http://scs.georgetown.edu/

Regards,

Piet

 

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