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Thanks Jon for your edits to the 8 questions for the poster. I've attached another draft, with a few minor edits to the questions themselves. One change of particular note though is the title. Originally it was "8 Great Questions to Ask About Making Content Accessible". You changed that to "8 Great Questions to Ask Vendors About Accessibility". While I agree that we'd like these eight questions to be something attendees can talk with vendors about, I think these questions also have broad applicability - they apply to vendors, but not exclusively to vendors. So, I changed the title to the more general "8 Great Questions to Ask About IT Accessibility". A nice side effect is this title is shorter and fits on two lines rather than three, which makes all the content fit a little better. Thoughts? Feedback? Additional edits? Thanks, Terrill -- Terrill Thompson Technology Accessibility Specialist DO-IT, Accessible Technology UW Information Technology University of Washington tft@uw.edu 206-221-4168 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
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ITAccessibility2.2.pptx1.19 MB

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Hi All - from left field here..., Title change: elimination of "Making" removes the presumption that this is something geared only for Technicians. I like that. Bill
Sounds good to me Jon Jon Gunderson Sent from my iPhone
Here's my 2 Cents. It is important that everyone understand the questions and identify with the them. Do not assume that everyone understand the vocabularies we are using in our fields. I am for the idea to add some clarification to some of the questions. Please see my edits below. Note that we are using terms like application, content, page, document somehow interchangeably here. We probably want to normalize the terminologies here. In my suggestions I am differentiating between application as a whole, content as the main information in a page, and a page as a snapshot of an application. 8 Great Questions to Ask About IT Accessibility 1 Can the application be used with only the keyboard? 2 Does the content include headings and landmarks? HR: Are the application and content logically structured using landmarks and headings? 3 Do form controls and web widgets have labels? HR: Do form controls and web widgets have proper labels to be used by blind users? 4 Do images have appropriate text descriptions? HR: Do informational images have appropriate text descriptions? 5 When styling and layout is removed is the document understandable? HR: Can the page be understood and used by blind users where all styling and layout is removed? 6 Does audio content have transcripts and do videos have captions? 7 Does text content have enough color contrast? HR: Does the page provide sufficient contrast and does it flow without loosing content when it is zoomed in? 8 Do pages have a consistent look-and-feel?
Terrill, This looks terrific. Will the audience for the poster be newcomers to IT accessibility, or those who already have knowledge or experience in this area? If newcomers, I might suggest reordering the list so the most commonly understood items appear first and the list grows in difficulty. For example, when I provide accessibility training there are some things everyone understands and immediately relates to (keyboard, images, audio, video, etc.) and other things fewer people understand (landmarks, form controls, labels). If this were the case for the poster audience, I might suggest moving items 2 and 3 to the bottom of the list. Thanks, Janet Janet Sylvia Web Accessibility Group, Leader Digital Media Professional OCTS-CAES 107 Hoke Smith Annex University of Georgia Athens, GA 30602 706-542-3936 ________________________________________
Hi All, First, thanks Hadi and others who have provided feedback off-list regarding the "8 Great Questions". We seem to be moving in a direction that adds accuracy and clarity to the questions, but we need to balance that with length since shorter questions fit much better in the available space on the poster. Also, while accuracy and clarity are important, we need to keep in mind that these questions are essentially a marketing piece, designed to raise awareness, stimulate discussion, and motivate folks to seek further information by joining our CG. I think if we get too bogged down trying to be complete and accurate, these items start reading like the WCAG. That said, I'd love to know how the membership feels. We have several variations to consider now for each question. I've listed them all below, and labeled each with a letter. If members of the list could send me your votes off-list (along with any other feedback you might have), that would be appreciated. I'll need all input by noon Pacific time on Friday (9/14) since the poster is due to EDUCAUSE by the end of that day. Please select the item that you feel will best help us to meet our goals. Our goals are: - To raise awareness of IT accessibility among members of our target audience - To provide specific questions that can be used as a starting point for guiding discussions of accessibility with vendors, colleagues, etc. - To motivate people to seek additional information by joining the Constituent Group Our target audience includes: - CIOs and other IT leaders; people with a high level of influence making important decisions about IT on higher education campuses - Vendors of IT products - All other attendees at EDUCAUSE national and regional conferences; essentially anyone who may play a role in purchasing, creating, deploying, or maintaining IT in higher education With these goals and target audiences in mind, please let me know which variations you feel work best (feel free to recommend alternatives too): Title: "8 Great Questions to Ask About IT Accessibility" Question #1 a) Can you use it without a mouse? b) Can the application be used with only the keyboard? c) Can it be used without a mouse? Question #2 a) Do your images have appropriate text descriptions? b) Do images have appropriate text descriptions? c) Do informational images have appropriate text descriptions? Question #3 a) Do your pages have a consistent look-and-feel? b) Do pages have a consistent look-and-feel? Question #4 a) Do you use enough color contrast? b) Does text content have enough color contrast? c) Does the page provide sufficient contrast and does it flow without loosing content when it is zoomed in? Question #5 a) Have you divided up your content with headings? b) Does the content include headings and landmarks? c) Are the application and content logically structured using landmarks and headings? Question #6 a) Does each form input have an appropriate label? b) Do form controls and web widgets have labels? c) Do form controls and web widgets have proper labels to be used by blind users? Question #7 a) Can you view a text-only version and understand it? b) When styling and layout is removed is the document understandable? c) Can the page be understood and used by blind users where all styling and layout is removed? Question #8 a) Do you have transcripts for any audio or video? b) Does audio content have transcripts and do videos have captions? Thanks! Terrill
Terrill,

I appreciate Hadi's comments, and think they have a place in training documentation, and more technical discussions, but I agree with you that this level of precision is misplaced in marketing pieces. 

Carefully crafted less is much more to the distracted EDUCAUSE attendees.

My votes:

Q1: a
Q2: b
Q3: b
Q4: a, but I agree with Hadi that content has to flow. 9 great questions?
Q:5 a 
Q:6 a
Q:7 a
Q8: a, but delete "any"

I like simple language.

Christian




On Wednesday, September 12, 2012, Terrill Thompson wrote:
Hi All,

First, thanks Hadi and others who have provided feedback off-list
regarding the "8 Great Questions".

We seem to be moving in a direction that adds accuracy and clarity to
the questions, but we need to balance that with length since shorter
questions fit much better in the available space on the poster. Also,
while accuracy and clarity are important, we need to keep in mind that
these questions are essentially a marketing piece, designed to raise
awareness, stimulate discussion, and motivate folks to seek further
information by joining our CG. I think if we get too bogged down
trying to be complete and accurate, these items start reading like the
WCAG.

That said, I'd love to know how the membership feels. We have several
variations to consider now for each question. I've listed them all
below, and labeled each with a letter. If members of the list could
send me your votes off-list (along with any other feedback you might
have), that would be appreciated. I'll need all input  by noon Pacific
time on Friday (9/14) since the poster is due to EDUCAUSE by the end
of that day.  Please select the item that you feel will best help us
to meet our goals.

Our goals are:

 - To raise awareness of IT accessibility among members of our target audience
 - To provide specific questions that can be used as a starting point
for guiding discussions of accessibility with vendors, colleagues,
etc.
 - To motivate people to seek additional information by joining the
Constituent Group

Our target audience includes:

 - CIOs and other IT leaders; people with a high level of influence
making important decisions about IT on higher education campuses
 - Vendors of IT products
 - All other attendees at EDUCAUSE national and regional conferences;
essentially anyone who may play a role in purchasing, creating,
deploying, or maintaining IT in higher education

With these goals and target audiences in mind, please let me know
which variations you feel work best (feel free to recommend
alternatives too):

Title: "8 Great Questions to Ask About IT Accessibility"

Question #1
a)  Can you use it without a mouse?
b) Can the application be used with only the keyboard?
c) Can it be used without a mouse?

Question #2
a) Do your images have appropriate text descriptions?
b) Do images have appropriate text descriptions?
c) Do informational images have appropriate text descriptions?

Question #3
a) Do your pages have a consistent look-and-feel?
b) Do pages have a consistent look-and-feel?

Question #4
a) Do you use enough color contrast?
b) Does text content have enough color contrast?
c) Does the page provide sufficient contrast and does it flow without
loosing content when it is zoomed in?

Question #5
a) Have you divided up your content with headings?
b) Does the content include headings and landmarks?
c) Are the application and content logically structured using
landmarks and headings?

Question #6
a) Does each form input have an appropriate label?
b) Do form controls and web widgets have labels?
c) Do form controls and web widgets have proper labels to be used by
blind users?

Question #7
a) Can you view a text-only version and understand it?
b) When styling and layout is removed is the document understandable?
c) Can the page be understood and used by blind users where all
styling and layout is removed?

Question #8
a) Do you have transcripts for any audio or video?
b) Does audio content have transcripts and do videos have captions?

Thanks!
Terrill



Terry, Here are my responses. I think we should have a handout with more detailed explanations and how this these questions can be used to evaluate both institutionally developed and vended web content and applications. > >Question #1 >b) Can the application be used with only the keyboard? > >Question #2 >b) Do images have appropriate text descriptions? > >Question #3 >b) Do pages have a consistent look-and-feel? > >Question #4 >b) Does text content have enough color contrast? > >Question #5 >d) Is the logical structure of content identified in headings and >landmarks? > >Question #6 >d) Do form controls and web widgets have accessible labels? > >Question #7 >b) When styling and layout is removed is the document understandable? > >Question #8 >b) Does audio content have transcripts and do videos have captions? > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thanks to everyone who voted and/or provided feedback on the "8 Great Questions". Some of you offered great alternatives for expressing these ideas effectively. Unfortunately in some cases I had to make decisions based on available space. Today's the deadline, so attached is the final poster. Also, I've attached the final logo that I used. A few of us who attended the September teleconference have been comparing various designs. I don't think we necessarily reached consensus but there seemed to be general support for the one I selected, the "high contrast" logo. This is a simple design with white on black text that simply says "Accessibility". Above that are four icons, each in a different color, depicting an eye, hand, ear, and brain, symbolizing the full spectrum of disabilities. Thanks to Christy Blew at University of Illinois for doing the design work! We plan to use the logo widely - on stickers, flyers, possibly T-shirts, etc. Let us know if you have ideas and would like to help disseminate. The more people see this logo, the more they'll start to ask questions about it. Regards, Terrill
Truly - is there no limits to the EXCELLENCE you-all practice and produce! [smile] Bill G ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE IT Accessibility Constituent Group Listserv [ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Terrill Thompson [tft@UW.EDU] Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 1:36 PM To: ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ITACCESS] Another poster draft Thanks to everyone who voted and/or provided feedback on the "8 Great Questions". Some of you offered great alternatives for expressing these ideas effectively. Unfortunately in some cases I had to make decisions based on available space. Today's the deadline, so attached is the final poster. Also, I've attached the final logo that I used. A few of us who attended the September teleconference have been comparing various designs. I don't think we necessarily reached consensus but there seemed to be general support for the one I selected, the "high contrast" logo. This is a simple design with white on black text that simply says "Accessibility". Above that are four icons, each in a different color, depicting an eye, hand, ear, and brain, symbolizing the full spectrum of disabilities. Thanks to Christy Blew at University of Illinois for doing the design work! We plan to use the logo widely - on stickers, flyers, possibly T-shirts, etc. Let us know if you have ideas and would like to help disseminate. The more people see this logo, the more they'll start to ask questions about it. Regards, Terrill
Looks good Terry, thank you for organizing this. Jon -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE IT Accessibility Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Terrill Thompson Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 3:37 PM To: ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ITACCESS] Another poster draft Thanks to everyone who voted and/or provided feedback on the "8 Great Questions". Some of you offered great alternatives for expressing these ideas effectively. Unfortunately in some cases I had to make decisions based on available space. Today's the deadline, so attached is the final poster. Also, I've attached the final logo that I used. A few of us who attended the September teleconference have been comparing various designs. I don't think we necessarily reached consensus but there seemed to be general support for the one I selected, the "high contrast" logo. This is a simple design with white on black text that simply says "Accessibility". Above that are four icons, each in a different color, depicting an eye, hand, ear, and brain, symbolizing the full spectrum of disabilities. Thanks to Christy Blew at University of Illinois for doing the design work! We plan to use the logo widely - on stickers, flyers, possibly T-shirts, etc. Let us know if you have ideas and would like to help disseminate. The more people see this logo, the more they'll start to ask questions about it. Regards, Terrill
Terrill, This looks terrific - the design is simple and effective; the logo is wonderful! Kudos to you and Christy! I'll be happy to help disseminate (stickers, flyers, etc.) to our statewide Web Accessibility Group. Our membership reaches the University System of Georgia and beyond. Janet Janet Sylvia Web Accessibility Group, Leader Digital Media Professional OCTS-CAES 107 Hoke Smith Annex University of Georgia Athens, GA 30602 706-542-3936 ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE IT Accessibility Constituent Group Listserv [ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Terrill Thompson [tft@UW.EDU] Sent: Friday, September 14, 2012 4:36 PM To: ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ITACCESS] Another poster draft Thanks to everyone who voted and/or provided feedback on the "8 Great Questions". Some of you offered great alternatives for expressing these ideas effectively. Unfortunately in some cases I had to make decisions based on available space. Today's the deadline, so attached is the final poster. Also, I've attached the final logo that I used. A few of us who attended the September teleconference have been comparing various designs. I don't think we necessarily reached consensus but there seemed to be general support for the one I selected, the "high contrast" logo. This is a simple design with white on black text that simply says "Accessibility". Above that are four icons, each in a different color, depicting an eye, hand, ear, and brain, symbolizing the full spectrum of disabilities. Thanks to Christy Blew at University of Illinois for doing the design work! We plan to use the logo widely - on stickers, flyers, possibly T-shirts, etc. Let us know if you have ideas and would like to help disseminate. The more people see this logo, the more they'll start to ask questions about it. Regards, Terrill
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