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Terry, I did some editing of the poster questions to make them more vendor oriented. Maybe we could have some handouts for people to take with them into the exhibit area to ask vendors questions. Jon ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
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Does anyone know if there is some kind of a certification that can be placed on an online course to show that it has passed a review for accessibility and/or Universal Design?

Ellen

Ellen Marie Murphy
Director of Online Curriculum
SUNY Empire State College
113 West Ave
Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
518-587-2100 Ext: 2961
twitter: ellen_marie



From:        "Gunderson, Jon R" <jongund@ILLINOIS.EDU>
To:        ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU,
Date:        09/11/2012 10:08 AM
Subject:        [ITACCESS] Updated Educause Poster Questions for national conference
Sent by:        The EDUCAUSE IT Accessibility Constituent Group Listserv <ITACCESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>



Terry,

I did some editing of the poster questions to make them more vendor oriented.

Maybe we could have some handouts for people to take with them into the exhibit area to ask vendors questions.

Jon


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

[attachment "ITAccessibility.pptx" deleted by Ellen Murphy/SUNY]
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from lgreco@berkeley.edu

Good question.

We are going to set up a process here and what we are thinking is that there will be a check list to make sure the instructor knows what the needed steps are. But as far as I know there is no certification. And I would not lightly adopt one. For example you could do something like have nfb certify the class but that does not say other disabilities can use the class as well. So the process we are using here is I am going to work with a team of coders to look at the classes and test for the disability’s we can and use our in house tool AMP to do some testing. But we also are going to have ways to communicate with instructors so that if they come up with a problem after the course goes live they have a network of support to help. certifying anything on the web is really not a good strategy as soon as it has been tested it changes and you have to start over again. Lucy

 

 

Lucia Greco

Web Access Analyst

IST-Campus Technology Services

University of California, Berkeley

(510) 289-6008

http://webaccess.berkeley.edu

 

Terry, I think I would like to have the first bullet in the list say something more like this: "Demonstrate how to use your product with just the keyboard" Jon
Message from daritz@ucdavis.edu

Thanks, Dave. Lucy’s reply is interesting and I agree with her.

 

There are systems and tools that have been established to certify that an online course has met some kind of a standard. One tool that is well known but rather expensive is the Quality Matters program, which is a faculty peer review process with a pretty extensive checklist and training regimen. It’s proprietary, so I don’t know if they include any checklist items regarding accessibility.

 

Another good example that is more open is the CSU Chico Rubric for Online Instruction. See page 3 for a specific mention of accessibility, though I think the whole thing is a great example of Universal Design. This rubric is pretty well respected in the online course design field, from what I can tell, but again its strength lies in how well the reviewing faculty use it.

 

The way we’ve addressed it so far at UCD is to require faculty who get money from the provost for hybrid courses to attend a workshop series that includes segments on accessibility and universal design. Then, as the courses go through development, we as instructional designers keep reminding faculty about the next steps that will make their course more accessible. That’s not really a formal certification as I imagine Ellen to mean.

 

I hope this is helpful.

 

Rosemary

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Rosemary Capps, Ph.D.

Assistant Director

Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL)

University of California, Davis

http://cetl.ucdavis.edu

rcapps@ucdavis.edu

 

 

If the course goes through a Quality Matters review and receives the certification, it will include a section on accessibility. Check http://www.qmprogram.org/ for general information. The accessibility standards are covered in standard 8, see http://www.qmprogram.org/files/QM_Standards_2011-2013.pdf Hope that's helpful. Sherry Lindquist, EdD Institutional Research Coordinator/English Northland Community and Technical College 2022 Central Avenue NE East Grand Forks, MN 56721 ________________________________________
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