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In the past we have offered a few key employees backup services for their office computers.  We use Atempo and load the agent on their computers to do the backups.  I am now looking at going with a service such as MozyPro or Carbonite to backup all employee computers.  What I would like to do is offer the service and pay for it from IT.  However, if some needs more than X-gigs backup'd, then I would expect the department to pay IT for the additional storage space in order to have them justify the need for extra storage. 

So, if you are doing something similar, I would like to hear from you on a few items:

1.  What service are you using to provide backups for employee office computers?

2.  Do you charge the departments for the service?

3.  How much do you charge for the service?

4.  Do you exclude certain file types from the backups?  If so, which ones?


My big concern, is that I start a service needing 1TB of storage costing $A and then a couple of years go by and the cost has risen to $A * 10.

Thank you,

John

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  John R. Davis  <davisj@marietta.edu>
  Chief Information Officer
  Marietta College
  215 Fifth St.
  Marietta, OH  45750
  Voice: 740-376-4390
  Fax:   740-376-4812
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments


Also, I would be interested in seeing any policy you have concerning IT providing backups for employee computers.

And any policy on requiring employees to perform backups of their data.

Thanks again.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  John R. Davis  <davisj@marietta.edu>
  Chief Information Officer
  Marietta College
  215 Fifth St.
  Marietta, OH  45750
  Voice: 740-376-4390
  Fax:   740-376-4812
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: "John Davis" <davisj@marietta.edu>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Friday, December 7, 2012 11:29:48 AM
Subject: Backup Storage


In the past we have offered a few key employees backup services for their office computers.  We use Atempo and load the agent on their computers to do the backups.  I am now looking at going with a service such as MozyPro or Carbonite to backup all employee computers.  What I would like to do is offer the service and pay for it from IT.  However, if some needs more than X-gigs backup'd, then I would expect the department to pay IT for the additional storage space in order to have them justify the need for extra storage. 

So, if you are doing something similar, I would like to hear from you on a few items:

1.  What service are you using to provide backups for employee office computers?

2.  Do you charge the departments for the service?

3.  How much do you charge for the service?

4.  Do you exclude certain file types from the backups?  If so, which ones?


My big concern, is that I start a service needing 1TB of storage costing $A and then a couple of years go by and the cost has risen to $A * 10.

Thank you,

John

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  John R. Davis  <davisj@marietta.edu>
  Chief Information Officer
  Marietta College
  215 Fifth St.
  Marietta, OH  45750
  Voice: 740-376-4390
  Fax:   740-376-4812
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Also, if anyone has done an RFP for this type of service, i'd be interested in looking at it.

Darrell Lutey
Assistant Director, 702-895-0763
Office of Information Technology, UNLV
CBC B129 / Mail Stop 7040
http://oit.unlv.edu  |  Twitter@unlv_oit
IT Help Desk: 702-895-0777




From:        John Davis <davisj@MARIETTA.EDU>
To:        CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Date:        12/07/2012 08:46 AM
Subject:        Re: [CIO] Backup Storage
Sent by:        The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>




Also, I would be interested in seeing any policy you have concerning IT providing backups for employee computers.

And any policy on requiring employees to perform backups of their data.

Thanks again.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 John R. Davis  <davisj@marietta.edu>
 Chief Information Officer
 Marietta College
 215 Fifth St.
 Marietta, OH  45750
 Voice: 740-376-4390
 Fax:   740-376-4812
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


From: "John Davis" <davisj@marietta.edu>
To:
CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent:
Friday, December 7, 2012 11:29:48 AM
Subject:
Backup Storage


In the past we have offered a few key employees backup services for their office computers.  We use Atempo and load the agent on their computers to do the backups.  I am now looking at going with a service such as MozyPro or Carbonite to backup all employee computers.  What I would like to do is offer the service and pay for it from IT.  However, if some needs more than X-gigs backup'd, then I would expect the department to pay IT for the additional storage space in order to have them justify the need for extra storage.  

So, if you are doing something similar, I would like to hear from you on a few items:

1.  What service are you using to provide backups for employee office computers?

2.  Do you charge the departments for the service?

3.  How much do you charge for the service?

4.  Do you exclude certain file types from the backups?  If so, which ones?


My big concern, is that I start a service needing 1TB of storage costing $A and then a couple of years go by and the cost has risen to $A * 10.

Thank you,

John

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 John R. Davis  <davisj@marietta.edu>
 Chief Information Officer
 Marietta College
 215 Fifth St.
 Marietta, OH  45750
 Voice: 740-376-4390
 Fax:   740-376-4812
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files. We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it). Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file). While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it? Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Thomas,
 
The classic application of dealing with this is to use permissions on a shared file system to enable multiple users to edit the same file, and thus avoid the copy circulation.  I'm curious as to why you're not doing that in your environment.  We create departmental file shares where people can collaborate on documents, as well as some people who know how to set rights on their personal folders to allow shared access.
 
You can also of course use Google Drive and share access to files that way if you're a Google Apps customer. 
 
The trick of using software to manage this is that those copies are probably not exact duplicates, if each user has edited them independently, they're probably out of sync with one another.  You'd need tools that can detect similar documents and use rules like "save the most recently modified one".
 
We are basically allowing users to store things within relatively limited quotas.  We have some lower-cost shared storage that we're using for things like our communications department's photo archive, and those larger files.  Our longer storage strategy question is what our local file shares look like, how we balance local and cloud storage and how document retention issues play into it--as we start our Google Apps rollout we're telling people not to put their only copy of documents that are controlled by our retention policy on Google, and to store a local copy on our file servers as well where it is backed up regularly.  But it's an open question as to what our long-term strategy should be.  Backups of local hard drives?  Other collaborative tools?
 
--Mike


 
 
Mike Richichi
Director of Computing and Network Services
 
 
>>> "Carnwath, Thomas" <tcarnwath@UARTS.EDU> 4/30/2013 1:11 PM >>>
We are currently in the process of re-evaluating what we store/archive in an effort to better control costs associated with digital storage. As an art school we have growing digital media files as well as the usual office files.

We have a formal document retention policy (but rarely does any office follow it).

Right now we are in the process of announcing "spring cleaning" to all those who have files on our Share. All we are asking them to do is remove duplicate (exact copies) files of which we have close to 18,000 instances of two, three, four copies of the same file stored by various offices that tend to work together. (So one office generates the file, sends it on to another for use (who saves it) and may send on to two other offices (who also save the same file).

While we are looking at software tools to better assist us in purging, can folks share how they are managing storage space, is it a concern, how do you entice folks to limit what they save and who saves it?

Any assistance would be helpful. We can just keep buying disc space.

Tom

Thomas H. Carnwath
Vice President
Technology and Information Services
Hamilton Hall
320 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102


Tel: 215-717-6440

[cid:4638E0C7-A9B7-4D24-A28B-DE90052D810C]

Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers.
OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone.

This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful.

Please consider the environment before printing this email.


**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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