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Hello All,

 

I was asked to find out if there is a basic “computer science” class. This is for a non-IT person to understand how IT operates or should. I have been looking around on the web and locally for something remotely similar. Or is there some MOOC that covers this? ;-)

 

In other words is there a seminar, webinar, or a physical class that can help educate someone about the IT organization without requiring them to take prerequisites. For a person that has IT under his/her belt, without any “real” IT experience, how do they run an organization?

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Richard Bazile

Assistant Director of Information Technology,

Administrative and Educational Support Services

Miles College

Fairfield AL

205-929-1741

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Richard,
 
I highly recommend picking up a copy of, "Boiling the IT Frog: How to Make Your Business Information Technology Wildly Successful Without Having to Learn Anything Technical" by Harwell Thrasher.  It gives a very good explanation of what IT does, what it should do but doesn't, and the importance of business-IT alignment.  Here's a short explanation:  http://youtu.be/DdoMSyeSk6E
 
We offer MA and certificate programs in Information Technology Management.  Below are some courses that may provide some of what you're looking for:
 
ITM 340
MANAGING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE BUSINESS ENTERPRISE
Provides an introduction to the business knowledge and management skills necessary for leadership roles in IT departments. Emphases include aligning IT to the needs of business processes and enabling business value. Students will learn and utilize IT management frameworks such as COBIT and ITIL. The culminating project in the course asks students to address a management challenge in which students apply process tools and management frameworks to the solution of a business problem. Should be taken as the first course in the MSITM advanced program.

ITM 342
ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE PLANNING
Examines the elements of enterprise architecture and how the IT leader links the business mission, strategy, and processes of an organization to its IT strategy. Students will examine the different EA methodologies and approaches, and understand where they fit into the IT function. Key linkages between business strategy, IT project portfolio management, and EA will be explored. Using case studies, students will learn how to apply the tenets of the EA discipline to define and chart the course of IT strategy to solve strategic business problems.
 
ITM 344
IT GOVERNANCE, PORTFOLIO, PROGRAM MANAGEMENT
Introduces the processes of IT governance, IT project portfolio management, and IT program management. Students will learn how to identify and take the lead in effective IT decision making, manage multiple IT investments using principles of portfolio management, and organize and control and the program delivery process. They will learn how to charter and organize a program management office (PMO), demonstrate the interrelationship between IT governance and portfolio management, articulate the frameworks and objectives of effective project portfolio management, and how to manage and control the delivery of multiple IT project investments. Contemporary IT management texts, case studies, and selected readings will be used.

 
Scott Ciliberti
Chief Information Officer, IT Services
Golden Gate University
(415) 369-5365
 
 
>>> On 7/25/2013 at 8:35 AM, in message <51F1F452.EB3 : 243 : 20147>, "Richard J. Bazile" <rbazile@MILES.EDU> wrote

Hello All,

 

I was asked to find out if there is a basic “computer science” class. This is for a non-IT person to understand how IT operates or should. I have been looking around on the web and locally for something remotely similar. Or is there some MOOC that covers this? ;-)

 

In other words is there a seminar, webinar, or a physical class that can help educate someone about the IT organization without requiring them to take prerequisites. For a person that has IT under his/her belt, without any “real” IT experience, how do they run an organization?

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

Thanks,

Richard Bazile

Assistant Director of Information Technology,

Administrative and Educational Support Services

Miles College

Fairfield AL

205-929-1741

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi,
This is an interesting scenario.  If a person without any "real" IT experience is leading an IT organization, they will be challenged.  What is leadership in this context?  Does it include resource allocation and management responsibilities, with those resources defined as time, talent, technology, budget, space, knowledge?  What are the individual's qualifications that would enable them to lead in those resource areas?  I wonder if "a class" would be enough.  It might depend on the depth of the responsibility.

On the leadership aspect:
This article is a nice quick read on IT leadership without direct supervisory authority:  http://www.cioinsight.com/c/a/Expert-Voices/IT-Leadership-Overcoming-Three-Limiting-Myths-304434/  

On leading the human capital management resource:
Leading technology staff can be quite different from traditional 'human capital management' ideas.  The book Leading Geeks:  How to Manage and Lead the People Who Deliver Technology by Paul Glen is an excellent read and introduction.  There's useful information on the related web site:  http://leadinggeeks.com/

On leading the technology resource:
How willing is this individual to go to the national Educause Conference?  Attending this conference can be eye-opening for someone who is not aware of the depth and variety of technical options and decisions needed to create and operate a successful IT organization.  Just spending a couple hours on the vendor floor is an education.  Attending a wide variety of sessions is very informative.

On leading the budget resource:
Issue #6 in the Educause Top-Ten survey provides a great introduction: 

Issue #6: Funding Information Technology Strategically

I also think this report from Phil Goldstein in the Educause Library is still useful:  http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/information-technology-funding-higher-education

On leading IT spaces:
This includes everything from datacenters to computer labs.  The fall Educause conference has a few good sessions on learning spaces listed in the program.  Also, BICSI offers training in datacenter design and related elements:  https://www.bicsi.org/single.aspx?l=2464,4192,4194

On leading knowledge:
This is a tough one, for me.  How would this person determine what knowledge was needed in the organization in order for the organization to be successful?  For example, we've had a lot of discussions this past year on development, relating to what skills will we use for developing applications and mobile?  Java?  C# / .Net?  the Groovy/Grails platform? We cannot afford to provide skill development in all the languages, and we aren't large enough to have one person for each technical skill.  That means skill consolidation.  That is one simple example.  How do you explain to someone that you've got to look at the product platforms, assess the skills needed to support those platforms, and make decisions about when to enhance the skills of your current talent workforce, or to add additional positions to your talent workforce?  How do you assess the campus readiness and organizational capacity for skill change, even with something as basic as changing email platforms?  I'm not aware of a course or book that teaches that or covers it in an overview sort of way. 

Hope this helps in some way.

Best wishes, -
Theresa


And maybe ITANA gets at some of this  in an overview - http://itana.org/

T-


Richard, this is a very interesting question and very complex!.  I think we all get that question some time (we are IT, right?).  I want to learn, where do I start.

I do not think you will find such course because it depends on the needs of that person and defining “understand how IT operates”.  Do you mean specific Computer Operations?  Digital Literacy?  Digital Citizenship?  I think if you ask IT people they will define it in multiple ways.  Faculty will need knowledge slightly different than administrators, occasional users, students, staff.  Each one have specific needs.  Then you also have the specific knowledge anyone needs in order to function in their specific environment (specific OS, applications, etc). Unfortunately all the knowledge is scattered around, there are lots of online sources topic specific but no defined path (because is very personal). I think this is a good insight for us administrators on providing such path and structured learning as possible with workshops and training but also a guide for unstructured learning.

I am working on a school assignment to create individualized professional development plan for technology literacy (I would love to create one for my institution given the time) and I came across the ISTE NETS-S standards to guide education leaders in planning use of technology.  It is intended to students but I think it blends well for any professional in any field.  It is no training but a list of skills and knowledge we should develop using technology. The standard is  a good starting point for a conversation  and planning (personal or institutional) of what is important to understand about technology (in 2013)  and how we apply that on our daily lives.  Unfortunately people still has that idea of IT vs non-IT.  In reality, to survive this word and be employable we need to understand technology (more so to leaders no matter our field).  Of course individual needs will determine the level of knowledge on a specific area from awareness to expert.   

Sorry I do not have a course to point you to  take a look at the standards,  you may find they did a great job grouping  describing and identifying relevant items.  In technology there are so many ways to accomplish one goal, the difficult thing is to understand and define that goal.

http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students/nets-student-standards-2007

Regards,

 

Maria Piret

Director Information Systems

Lynn University

3601 N. Military Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561-237-7355

mpiret@lynn.edu

Google+ / LinkedIn

 

Please consider the environment before printing.

 

 

 

 

Message from luke.fernandez@gmail.com

That's an interesting list of digital literacies (in http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students/nets-student-standards-2007 ).  Does anybody else have lists like these?  

Cheers,

Luke

PS: 

I was wondering whether, under digital citizenship if might also be appropriate to include some clauses like:

e. Understands theories of technological change and what cultures and ideologies catalyze technological innovation.  
f. Understands some of the basic relationships between technology, economy, society, and the individual.
g. Understands how to use disciplinary approaches from the humanities and the social behavioral sciences for making sense of challenges that I.T. faces.

And what about usability?  Is an understanding of usability an important component of digital literacy?


How about asking a few folks on this list (like Theresa or someone from a similar size/scope institution) to have a phone call with your new IT person where they can interview them on key aspects. Hopefully that conversation could serve as a foundation for discovery and further investigation. I can't imagine any single course/book/resource could provide a person with the organizational and operational understanding to run IT.  I believe Educause and Campus Technology have done sessions on "The New CIO." Aren't we always talking about mentorship on this list? Maybe contacting those currently in the field can provide a perspective, case study, lessons learned "just in time" as opposed to trying to take it all in at once while not knowing what from what.

Good luck,
Patrick

On 07/26/2013 11:44 AM, Theresa Rowe wrote:
And maybe ITANA gets at some of this  in an overview - http://itana.org/

T-


Thank you so much all for your responses.

The situation is as such,…my direct administrator had IT given to her under a college re-organization. IT as an organization was not a priority as much as getting IT done. So, when she inherited the group she wanted to shape the group. However, she does not have an IT background. She has tried to “shape” the group using her backgrounds in other areas.

 

From my own experience IT and libraries tends to be different “creatures” when it comes to organizations. Since coming on board I have noticed a difference. I’m sure I could give her “my” opinion on how things should be shaped, but I think she wants to have some “evidence” for her own peace of mind. She has other departments she is responsible for so, I think she may be trying to keep them all separate and functional. She does not consider herself a “CIO” per se. But, she does feel like she needs to have a “basic” understanding of how things go and should.

 

I love the idea of a phone call with “senior” IT people. I think I’ll suggest that along with ALL the fabulous resources I have gotten. I think the tipping point was when I put in my request for the annual conference she became more curious. I will suggest she joins me and can meet with some of you.

 

Thanks again for all the great information!!!

Richard Bazile

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv
Subject: Re: [CIO] Basic IT understanding

 

How about asking a few folks on this list (like Theresa or someone from a similar size/scope institution) to have a phone call with your new IT person where they can interview them on key aspects. Hopefully that conversation could serve as a foundation for discovery and further investigation. I can't imagine any single course/book/resource could provide a person with the organizational and operational understanding to run IT.  I believe Educause and Campus Technology have done sessions on "The New CIO." Aren't we always talking about mentorship on this list? Maybe contacting those currently in the field can provide a perspective, case study, lessons learned "just in time" as opposed to trying to take it all in at once while not knowing what from what.

Good luck,
Patrick

On 07/26/2013 11:44 AM, Theresa Rowe wrote:

And maybe ITANA gets at some of this  in an overview - http://itana.org/

T-

 

You might take a look at the book "The Adventures of an IT Leader" from Harvard Business Press.  It's told as a story of a person appointed CIO who came from another area in the company and goes through scenarios that he encountered in his first year.  It's a pretty enjoyable read and could resonate with someone in your new boss' situation (or yours for that matter).

Mike


I recently had an interim position as Facilities Director after a sudden vacancy there.

 

I had to deal with Custodians, Maintenance, Boiler projects, major remodeling, HVAC problems, roof leaks, getting the campus ready for commencement and capital budgeting for the next fiscal year.

 

This was a very interesting and rewarding tour – it definitely put me out of my comfort zone.

 

What paid off for me was

·         Treat people with respect.

·         Let the people who know how to do their jobs, do them.

·         Solve problems.

I think these tools can apply to any management job.

 

I feel like I could do any job on campus that does not require actual work!

 

Steve

 

Stephen Patrick
CIO Illinois College
1101 West College Avenue
Jacksonville, IL 62650
217.245.3399
www.ic.edu

 

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard J. Bazile
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 2:50 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Basic IT understanding

 

Thank you so much all for your responses.

The situation is as such,…my direct administrator had IT given to her under a college re-organization. IT as an organization was not a priority as much as getting IT done. So, when she inherited the group she wanted to shape the group. However, she does not have an IT background. She has tried to “shape” the group using her backgrounds in other areas.

 

From my own experience IT and libraries tends to be different “creatures” when it comes to organizations. Since coming on board I have noticed a difference. I’m sure I could give her “my” opinion on how things should be shaped, but I think she wants to have some “evidence” for her own peace of mind. She has other departments she is responsible for so, I think she may be trying to keep them all separate and functional. She does not consider herself a “CIO” per se. But, she does feel like she needs to have a “basic” understanding of how things go and should.

 

I love the idea of a phone call with “senior” IT people. I think I’ll suggest that along with ALL the fabulous resources I have gotten. I think the tipping point was when I put in my request for the annual conference she became more curious. I will suggest she joins me and can meet with some of you.

 

Thanks again for all the great information!!!

Richard Bazile

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv
Subject: Re: [CIO] Basic IT understanding

 

How about asking a few folks on this list (like Theresa or someone from a similar size/scope institution) to have a phone call with your new IT person where they can interview them on key aspects. Hopefully that conversation could serve as a foundation for discovery and further investigation. I can't imagine any single course/book/resource could provide a person with the organizational and operational understanding to run IT.  I believe Educause and Campus Technology have done sessions on "The New CIO." Aren't we always talking about mentorship on this list? Maybe contacting those currently in the field can provide a perspective, case study, lessons learned "just in time" as opposed to trying to take it all in at once while not knowing what from what.

Good luck,
Patrick

On 07/26/2013 11:44 AM, Theresa Rowe wrote:

And maybe ITANA gets at some of this  in an overview - http://itana.org/

T-

 

There surely must be some CIOs who come from a library background who could assist you with such ‘conversations’. I know the recently retired CIO from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada came from a library background and had responsibility for both IT and Libraries. Their current one probably does too, although I don’t know who it is currently. Perhaps some of the CUCCIO folks who read this listserve could help, or perhaps the Guelph CIO does and will identify themselves? J

 

Ian McLeod, CCP, I.S.P., ITCP/IP3P

Chief Information Officer

Douglas College

Box 2503, 700 Royal Avenue

New Westminster, BC  V3L 5B2

Direct Line: 604-527-5870

Cell: 604-362-5332

Email: mcleodi1@douglascollege.ca

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Richard J. Bazile
Sent: Friday, July 26, 2013 12:50 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Basic IT understanding

 

Thank you so much all for your responses.

The situation is as such,…my direct administrator had IT given to her under a college re-organization. IT as an organization was not a priority as much as getting IT done. So, when she inherited the group she wanted to shape the group. However, she does not have an IT background. She has tried to “shape” the group using her backgrounds in other areas.

 

From my own experience IT and libraries tends to be different “creatures” when it comes to organizations. Since coming on board I have noticed a difference. I’m sure I could give her “my” opinion on how things should be shaped, but I think she wants to have some “evidence” for her own peace of mind. She has other departments she is responsible for so, I think she may be trying to keep them all separate and functional. She does not consider herself a “CIO” per se. But, she does feel like she needs to have a “basic” understanding of how things go and should.

 

I love the idea of a phone call with “senior” IT people. I think I’ll suggest that along with ALL the fabulous resources I have gotten. I think the tipping point was when I put in my request for the annual conference she became more curious. I will suggest she joins me and can meet with some of you.

 

Thanks again for all the great information!!!

Richard Bazile

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv
Subject: Re: [CIO] Basic IT understanding

 

How about asking a few folks on this list (like Theresa or someone from a similar size/scope institution) to have a phone call with your new IT person where they can interview them on key aspects. Hopefully that conversation could serve as a foundation for discovery and further investigation. I can't imagine any single course/book/resource could provide a person with the organizational and operational understanding to run IT.  I believe Educause and Campus Technology have done sessions on "The New CIO." Aren't we always talking about mentorship on this list? Maybe contacting those currently in the field can provide a perspective, case study, lessons learned "just in time" as opposed to trying to take it all in at once while not knowing what from what.

Good luck,
Patrick

On 07/26/2013 11:44 AM, Theresa Rowe wrote:

And maybe ITANA gets at some of this  in an overview - http://itana.org/

T-

 

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