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Good morning,

 

What area in your shops manage change management?  Who collects the data, who leads the meetings and does reporting etc…

Thank you all.

 

Shari

 

 

Shari L Waters

Chief Information Officer

swaters@chapman.edu

 

IS&T WILL NEVER ASK FOR YOUR PASSWORD - NEVER SHARE YOUR PASSWORD WITH OTHERS!

 

Chapman University

Information Systems & Technology

One University  Drive

Orange, CA 92866

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We have a change advisory board (CAB) comprised of 3 core line managers and key team leaders in ITS. They review all requests for changes and approve or seek more information, etc.

 

Ian McLeod, CCP, I.S.P., ITCP

Director, IT Services

Camosun College

3100 Foul Bay Road

Victoria, BC   V8P 5J2

Tel: 250-370-3293

Fax: 20-470-3966

Email: mcleodi@camosun.bc.ca        

 

 

Hi Shari, At UW-Milwaukee, our relatively new formal change management process is a mix of traditional approaches and new ideas we have implemented to address what we feel are potential shortcomings in traditional change management implementations. As many others do, we have a change advisory board with: - A change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is a promising up-and-coming leader, yet does not have managerial duties. We feel that the change manager role offers an excellent professional development opportunity for such an individual. - A backup change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is manager of web & mobile services development. - Our Senior IT Communications Strategist - Representative from the networking/telecom group - Manager of operations support - Director of Client Services - Program manager for the IT Service Management Program - Executive sponsor of the CAB (currently me) The charter for the CAB indicates that we will re-evaluate membership on an annual basis, particularly in the interest of providing professional development opportunities for other staff. Unlike many others, our CAB only meets face-to-face when we want to discuss how we wish to refine our change management process. The CAB processes change requests virtually via an in-house developed, web-based tool. The reason we went this route was that we felt the typical once-a-week CAB meeting would not be agile enough for our needs. Additionally, we felt that an asynchronous virtual approach would align better with the future of work and our increasingly mobile workforce. Individuals submit change requests into the tool - normal changes must be submitted at least 10 business days in advance of the requested change date. There is also a way to flag emergency change requests. The CAB uses to the tool to comment, ask questions of the requester and/or each other, consult with the appropriate subject matter experts, etc. Members of the CAB can then use the tool to support approval, request revision, do not support approval, abstain (if there is a potential conflict of interest), or comment. The tool tracks when a decision is due from the CAB, and the change manager will use his/her discretion to render a decision on the change request before that decision due date. At many points in the process, emails are sent to the change requester, various stakeholders, the CAB, etc., as reminders of pending tasks. Each change request is stored in a database, and anyone in the central IT organization can access past, current, or pending change information through an interface that offers a pretty good selection of filters. As I mentioned, our formal change management process is relatively new (I believe we became "official" in May), but has so far been very effective. Individuals requesting changes are not held "hostage" to weekly CAB meetings, as some of us have experienced at other organizations. In fact, the CAB is seriously discussing whether we even need a full 10 business days to evaluate change requests, as we seem to be able to turn around the majority of the decisions more quickly. Of course, since the process is so new, it remains to be seen how it will fare over the longer term. Hope this helps, Melissa -- Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu) Director, Network & Operations Services University Information Technology Services University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Message from cdavie@ithaca.edu

Melissa, Thank you for sharing your process. Can you describe the types of changes that must go through the CAB and thus adhere to the 10 day window from a code development perspective? Is it upgrades, in-house developed code, minor data fixes? I'm wondering in particular about enhancements to code or data that don't rise to the level of "emergency", but from a customer service perspective, should go in into production sooner than the 10 day window. chris Christine Davie ERP Application Architect Ithaca College Ithaca, NY 14850 607 274-3868 ---- Original message ---- >Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2011 22:31:58 -0600 >From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv (on behalf of Melissa Woo ) >Subject: Re: [CIO] Change Management >To: CIO@listserv.educause.edu > >Hi Shari, > >At UW-Milwaukee, our relatively new formal change management process is a mix of traditional approaches and new ideas we have implemented to address what we feel are potential shortcomings in traditional change management implementations. > >As many others do, we have a change advisory board with: > >- A change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is a promising up-and-coming leader, yet does not have managerial duties. We feel that the change manager role offers an excellent professional development opportunity for such an individual. >- A backup change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is manager of web & mobile services development. >- Our Senior IT Communications Strategist >- Representative from the networking/telecom group >- Manager of operations support >- Director of Client Services >- Program manager for the IT Service Management Program >- Executive sponsor of the CAB (currently me) > >The charter for the CAB indicates that we will re-evaluate membership on an annual basis, particularly in the interest of providing professional development opportunities for other staff. > >Unlike many others, our CAB only meets face-to-face when we want to discuss how we wish to refine our change management process. > >The CAB processes change requests virtually via an in-house developed, web-based tool. The reason we went this route was that we felt the typical once-a-week CAB meeting would not be agile enough for our needs. Additionally, we felt that an asynchronous virtual approach would align better with the future of work and our increasingly mobile workforce. > >Individuals submit change requests into the tool - normal changes must be submitted at least 10 business days in advance of the requested change date. There is also a way to flag emergency change requests. > >The CAB uses to the tool to comment, ask questions of the requester and/or each other, consult with the appropriate subject matter experts, etc. Members of the CAB can then use the tool to support approval, request revision, do not support approval, abstain (if there is a potential conflict of interest), or comment. > >The tool tracks when a decision is due from the CAB, and the change manager will use his/her discretion to render a decision on the change request before that decision due date. > >At many points in the process, emails are sent to the change requester, various stakeholders, the CAB, etc., as reminders of pending tasks. > >Each change request is stored in a database, and anyone in the central IT organization can access past, current, or pending change information through an interface that offers a pretty good selection of filters. > >As I mentioned, our formal change management process is relatively new (I believe we became "official" in May), but has so far been very effective. Individuals requesting changes are not held "hostage" to weekly CAB meetings, as some of us have experienced at other organizations. In fact, the CAB is seriously discussing whether we even need a full 10 business days to evaluate change requests, as we seem to be able to turn around the majority of the decisions more quickly. Of course, since the process is so new, it remains to be seen how it will fare over the longer term. > >Hope this helps, > >Melissa > >-- >Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu) >Director, Network & Operations Services >University Information Technology Services >University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee > > >
Anyone in the organization can submit a change management ticket using our Footprints system.  We print off the requests and meet to review them every Monday morning.  I usually chair the meeting.

Theresa Rowe

Theresa, What is your process for implementing the change once created? See soon at SIGUCCS!!! Best, Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Thursday, November 10, 2011 7:38 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Change Management

 

Anyone in the organization can submit a change management ticket using our Footprints system.  We print off the requests and meet to review them every Monday morning.  I usually chair the meeting.

Theresa Rowe

Once the change has been approved in committee, the person or team that submitted is responsible for implementing the change.
See you in San Diego -
Theresa

Do you have a sign off at the time of implementation? Do you have a schedule when changes are applied? For example only on Friday mornings? Best, Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Thursday, November 10, 2011 7:45 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Change Management

 

Once the change has been approved in committee, the person or team that submitted is responsible for implementing the change.
See you in San Diego -
Theresa

Hi Christine, Since we're still early on in the process, setting expectations regarding our change management requirements with our external customers is next on the list. As you're probably aware, this is likely to take a significant amount of socialization. ;-) That said, we're try to view our activities from a service delivery standpoint (or to be ITILv3-ish about it, how we provide value to the campus community). Changes to outward-facing services that potentially affect all or a significant portion of the campus population in definitely in scope for the 10-day window. At this point we're erring on the side of caution, i.e., including more than we probably should, with the understanding that this is an iterative process as we gain experience. We're currently "sipping our own champagne" on the code enhancement issue. That is, there have been a number of enhancements (both major and minor) that those of us using our own change management tool have been requesting. We are adhering to our own 10-day change request requirements for changes to the tool(*) and getting a feel for what is reasonable. (Seriously, there's something that has been driving me crazy for a while, so we can call that one of our acid tests!) Since the CAB does meet face-to-face to revise and refine our process, this may very well be one of the cases that we'll refine the process to include smaller request windows for minor enhancements, etc. Melissa (*) I leave it as an exercise for the reader to make the recursion joke about making a request to change the change request tool. -- Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu) Director, Network & Operations Services University Information Technology Services University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
More info is at:  http://www.oakland.edu/uts/policies#change

Background:
We've split into two event management strategies:  Change Management and Architecture Management.  Architecture management includes things like routine patch upgrades.  The guidelines for both are on that web site.

Our management window is Wednesday mornings between midnight and 8 AM.  This is the least disruptive time on our network.  Additionally, we are very small staffed, so many changes require vendor support.  To minimize costs, we avoid getting vendor support on weekends and holidays.  Once we established the Wednesday morning service expectation, the campus got used to it and it has been on the schedule for 10 years.  We just say expect service outages every week between midnight and 8 AM, but in reality most weeks don't have any outages or there are very brief outages.

We try to do as many change management items in that Wednesday morning window as we can, and sometimes that means breaking apart changes into smaller pieces that can be done that way.

Sometimes changes are too big to be done in that window, and we have to go to a weekend.  That is more complicated and it requires a communication plan.

We don't require sign-off on changes.  Most are too broad to have "sign off" of a person or department, and we've found that for our campus, the signature is very problematic.

Theresa

I can speak of the process that was put in place while I was at my previous institution.

 

Weekly change mtgs are held on Tuesday afternoon. 

Agenda:

1. Review of planned changes

2. Review of planned past changes

3. Review any unplanned changes

 

Web forms are used to enter change requests, update changes and close changes (back end database tracks everything – it was/is a home grown system).    Representation from each IT area is required : Academic Learning, Systems, Networks, Banner, Client Services, Help Desk, Desktop, etc.  Change windows are outside normal service hours which is published on the services and support web page.  Three categories of changes were recorded:  one-time, recurring and on-going.  A recurring change is planned and is done at intervals (weekly, monthly, yearly).  Examples: UPS checks, updating lab images.  On-going changes are planned and are  time constrained (start and end dates identified).  Example : installing software upgrades/patches over a semester break.  Change types are either planned or unplanned (emergency changes are unplanned).

 

Changes are either scheduled/accepted or deferred (a.k.a. rejected).  We also used terms like Change Review Committee v. Change Review Board.  The meeting was chaired by the manager of Data Center Operations as most changes have to go through that area.  Reporting was done out of the Client Services.  Help Desk *must* be at every change meeting.  Change activity/information is published via internal listserv also.

 

The change process is a control process and was focused primarily on communication, coordination, scheduling, and monitoring change to IT supported production systems.  “Supported” being a key word and “communication” being the top priority.

 

I’d be happy to answer any other questions off-line.

 

AJS

 

Anthony J. Santucci

Manager, Public Labs

Technology Support Services

Appalachian State University

Boone, NC

 

For technical support, please enter a support request at:

http://support.appstate.edu/help

 

 

There is a book that I have found quite useful. It is called the Seven Arts of Change by David Shaner. It is a small book packed with a lot of useful information. God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > From: Christine Davie > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > > Date: Thu, 10 Nov 2011 03:11:23 -0800 > To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [CIO] Change Management > > Melissa, > > Thank you for sharing your process. Can you describe the types of changes > that must go through the CAB and thus adhere to the 10 day window from a code > development perspective? Is it upgrades, in-house developed code, minor data > fixes? I'm wondering in particular about enhancements to code or data that > don't rise to the level of "emergency", but from a customer service > perspective, should go in into production sooner than the 10 day window. > > chris > > Christine Davie > ERP Application Architect > Ithaca College > Ithaca, NY 14850 > 607 274-3868 > > > ---- Original message ---- >> Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2011 22:31:58 -0600 >> From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv >> (on behalf of Melissa Woo ) >> Subject: Re: [CIO] Change Management >> To: CIO@listserv.educause.edu >> >> Hi Shari, >> >> At UW-Milwaukee, our relatively new formal change management process is a mix >> of traditional approaches and new ideas we have implemented to address what >> we feel are potential shortcomings in traditional change management >> implementations. >> >> As many others do, we have a change advisory board with: >> >> - A change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is a >> promising up-and-coming leader, yet does not have managerial duties. We feel >> that the change manager role offers an excellent professional development >> opportunity for such an individual. >> - A backup change manager: The individual currently serving in this role is >> manager of web & mobile services development. >> - Our Senior IT Communications Strategist >> - Representative from the networking/telecom group >> - Manager of operations support >> - Director of Client Services >> - Program manager for the IT Service Management Program >> - Executive sponsor of the CAB (currently me) >> >> The charter for the CAB indicates that we will re-evaluate membership on an >> annual basis, particularly in the interest of providing professional >> development opportunities for other staff. >> >> Unlike many others, our CAB only meets face-to-face when we want to discuss >> how we wish to refine our change management process. >> >> The CAB processes change requests virtually via an in-house developed, >> web-based tool. The reason we went this route was that we felt the typical >> once-a-week CAB meeting would not be agile enough for our needs. >> Additionally, we felt that an asynchronous virtual approach would align >> better with the future of work and our increasingly mobile workforce. >> >> Individuals submit change requests into the tool - normal changes must be >> submitted at least 10 business days in advance of the requested change date. >> There is also a way to flag emergency change requests. >> >> The CAB uses to the tool to comment, ask questions of the requester and/or >> each other, consult with the appropriate subject matter experts, etc. Members >> of the CAB can then use the tool to support approval, request revision, do >> not support approval, abstain (if there is a potential conflict of interest), >> or comment. >> >> The tool tracks when a decision is due from the CAB, and the change manager >> will use his/her discretion to render a decision on the change request before >> that decision due date. >> >> At many points in the process, emails are sent to the change requester, >> various stakeholders, the CAB, etc., as reminders of pending tasks. >> >> Each change request is stored in a database, and anyone in the central IT >> organization can access past, current, or pending change information through >> an interface that offers a pretty good selection of filters. >> >> As I mentioned, our formal change management process is relatively new (I >> believe we became "official" in May), but has so far been very effective. >> Individuals requesting changes are not held "hostage" to weekly CAB meetings, >> as some of us have experienced at other organizations. In fact, the CAB is >> seriously discussing whether we even need a full 10 business days to evaluate >> change requests, as we seem to be able to turn around the majority of the >> decisions more quickly. Of course, since the process is so new, it remains to >> be seen how it will fare over the longer term. >> >> Hope this helps, >> >> Melissa >> >> -- >> Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu) >> Director, Network & Operations Services >> University Information Technology Services >> University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee >> >> >>
I highly recommend RANCID for running daily (or hourly, if you're that paranoid) config backups. RANCID logs all changes in CVS so you can retrieve the configs (or other information) from any point in time. I've customized it here to log all sorts of other information as well as device configs - routing and ARP tables, software/firmware versions, module inventory, power supply status, power levels on 10GE interfaces, load balancer resource utilization, etc. - from routers, switches, firewalls, load balancers, and DSLAMs by Cisco, Juniper, Force10, Allied Telesyn, and maybe a few others I'm forgetting. If you're reasonably fluent in Perl then you can make it do a lot; if you're willing to tackle TCL scripts then you can make it talk to almost anything with a command-line interface. And if you wrap a little shell scripting around it you can write simple real-time remote query/command tools - for example we've got scripts to let our NOC look at and bounce customers' DSL ports remotely... http://www.shrubbery.net/rancid/ This is *not* change management in the ITIL sense of tracking proposed changes through an approval process; it's a tool to let you see how your network is actually configured, as opposed to how you think it's configured. Dr. Kurt Hillig UMNet Administration I always tell the Fax (734)763-4050 University of Michigan absolute truth, Phone (734)647-8778 Ann Arbor, MI 48105-3640 as I see it. EMail khillig(at)umich.edu > Computers were invented to help people waste more time faster < On Fri, 6 Jan 2012, Dale DuVall wrote: > Hi all. > > What are folks using for change management? I'm looking for a tool where > we can record all of our equipment and track upgrades and fixes for > other admins to see, as well and upper management. We have wikis and > blogs, but I'm thinking there is something out there that tracks recent > changes by machine, and might list the most recent changes recorded so > we could use it as a troubleshooting tool as well as communicate recent > activities by each admin. > > > Dale > > > > > > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. > > !DSPAM:4f076432241923952620531! > > > > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hello,

Thanks everyone for the recent postings about ITSM solutions (Cherwell, Remedy, Service Desk Express, ServiceNow, FootPrints, others?) currently in use by group members. I have two follow-up questions regarding change management, specifically for infrastructure changes:

 

1) What solution does your IT infrastructure group use to track their changes?

 

2) If your organization has an overall ITSM solution, does your IT infrastructure group also use any additional or best-of-breed system(s) to keep track of their changes?

 

By IT infrastructure group, I mean the team that fulfills the technical management function for servers, storage, virtualization, network, firewalls, email, directory services, unified communications, telecom, etc.

Thanks in advance for your reply,

 

Margaret Misra

Senior DB Analyst, IS Operations

Information Services, Kent State University

Kent, Ohio 44242 www.kent.edu

330-672-1328 mmisra@kent.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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