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Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Comments

Paige,

For each project we monitor the following:

Challenges:

Outcomes:

Lessons Learned:


Next Steps:


Score Card

Percent Complete:

 

Sponsor:

 

OCT Group:

 

(REDACTED)Expense Code:

 

Department Budget:

 

Budget Amount:

 

QC Strategic Plan:

 

TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY:

 

CENTRAL OFFICE   PERFORMANCE MGT PLAN:

 

Middle States PRR:

 

NCATE, ALA et al

 



We also measure the project activity agains the funding source, get earned value,  accreditations, strategic plans for IT , the College, and the University.

This is to maintain alignment.

On the operations side:

We look at 

Availability of Service to the end user not uptime
# of Help Desk calls
User Satisfaction Surveys

We measure staff competence through testing and training

We measure software and license utilization.

I hope this helps

Best regards,
Naveed



Naveed I. Husain, PMP | Chief Information Officer | Office of Converging Technologies

Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing NY 11367-1597
718-997-3009 | Fax: 718-997-5678 | naveed.husain@qc.cuny.edu


From: <Francis>, Paige <pfrancis@FAIRFIELD.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, December 9, 2013 10:03 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [CIO] CIO Reporting

Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

You raise a good point to remember Paige, what excited IT folks usually is not well understood by non-IT folks.

 

I “report” to faculty and administrators a couple of times a semester on issues that touch them. Things like wireless coverage in classrooms and LMS enhancements. I share with leadership policy issues and questions, talk about bandwidth in general terms. Bottom line is that over the years its almost busy work. We love the stats, the rest of campus just want it to work the way they are used to it working….

 

One final comment. I, as VP, often get from my technical folks files of almost raw data. Files I need to spend time figuring out and interpreting rather that a concise report saying we’d had 527 attempts to bridge firewall last week (data made up).

 

Best,

Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President – Information Technology, Planning and Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY

New Phone Numbers for Molloy College
Main number:   516-323-3000

Direct number:  516-323-4848

 

Super helpful Naveed – thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

Hi Paige,

 

You might take a look at Gonzaga’s annual report.  I’m really happy with the result – I think we went data heavy, but focused on metrics that (we hope) matter to our users/customers.  I won’t say that it got an overwhelming response from within the university, but my boss refers people to it often.

 

http://www.gonzaga.edu/Campus-Resources/Offices-and-Services-A-Z/Information-Technology-Services/Annual_Report.asp

 

Chris

 

Chris Gill

Chief Information Officer

 

Gonzaga University

502 E. Boone Ave.

Spokane, WA 99258-0095

509.313.3827 / 509.313.3836

gill@its.gonzaga.edu

www.gonzaga.edu/ITS

Information Technology Services staff will never ask for your password. 

Never email your password to anyone or share confidential information in emails

 

 

 

Hi,
It is always interesting to look at the reports from other organizations.  Chris Gill's from Gonzaga is a visually informative and engaging presentation.   Rob Paterson's approach is more like ours.  We tried to engage on numbers and story, but so far it hasn't worked.  We put less time into our annual report (it is available on our web site at www.oakland.edu/uts/vision).

Right now I meet with different key governance groups at different times during the year, for different lengths of time.  I try to cover items that are of interest to them.  I am on the Dean's Council agenda for 20 minutes this week, for example.  That will be the only meeting I've had with them this year.  I am working on something of a story of items that I think would be of interest to them.  Half the group is new, so I'm focusing on "this is how IT is assembled at Oakland University."

Best wishes
Theresa


Hi Paige,

We have an IT advisory group of faculty, staff and students that we present our metrics to.  I'm actually updating these numbers for our January meeting and am enjoying the new CDS reporting (kudos CDS!).

We look at 
our IT budget vs headcount (faculty+staff+students), $X per person
our IT budget vs institutional budget, X%
FTE of IT staff, X FTE average
headcount (facstaffstudent) vs IT FTE, X people per IT FTE

against 4 different peer groups (a metro consortium, state private schools, national 4 year private schools, national Educause data)

We do an annual survey of faculty and staff and look some key indicators from there

How important are IT services to your work?
How satisfied overall are you with IT services?
Then we dig into satisfaction of some dimensions of the IT support received that reflects our concierge-style support model.  
We also dig into classroom satisfaction as we manage classrooms.

-- Scott


Chris:

 

Thanks for sharing this with us.  What an aspirational piece and a great job!

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

Scott Crow
Director of Information Technology

6832 Convent Blvd.
Sylvania, OH 43560
Direct: 419-824-3938
scrow@lourdes.edu

www.lourdes.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you very much Scott.  I’ll pass this on to the person who created it.

 

Chris

 

Hi Paige,

We use the attached “Annual Summary” format to communicate size/scope/volume in Run/Grow/Transform categories, and we also give a preview of what the coming year’s priorities will be.  This is a brochure format so you’d have to print it and fold it to get the visual effect; it has worked well for us; it includes quite a lot of information but doesn’t require that we spend a lot on a larger book format.  I also use it to engage conversations with key product/service providers so they get an understanding of our operation and priorities.

Best of luck!
Susan

 



The annual reports from the Office of Information technology Services at Case Western Reserve University are interesting, informative, and also very impressive.  The reports target a campus-wide audience.

Absolutely worth a look — and worth looking at several years of these reports (all online) to see how the IT goals and  issues of concern at Case have evolved over time.



Casey Green
The Campus Computing Project


==========


Paige,

As Vice President, I write a monthly communication to our president, vice presidents, deans, and cabinet regarding key initiatives. See examples here - 


A few thoughts about this -

a) It’s not a newsletter, it’s written as a personal executive to executive communication on key things that executives and Units heads need to know.

b) For the audience, it’s designed to provide them at the first of each month with an executive summary of key things, items they should stress at their own staff meetings, and it provides them the opportunity “speak up” if any of the items poses challenges or there are other things they need to bring up to me.

c) For my Units, it provides us the chance to “tell our own story” otherwise the story and defining narrative about our work, initiatives, strategies, will be told by someone else outside our Units.

d) It provides a nice “journal” of sorts that over time can provide fodder for annual reports, etc. In fact, you can go back for the 10 years I have been a CIO (at 3 institutions) and see a chronology of key initiatives, challenges, actions, and results.

For our audience, I believe they have found it to be an effective and necessary way to catch up each month with what is going on. For myself and my Units, it provides us a way to effectively communicate at the sr. most level of the institution.

I think the key principle is - the CIO and their teams will be defined by a narrative. The question is - are you seizing control over that narrative?

Best,

Tim 

This is great Tim. We do a one-page tech newsletter via Tumblr. It’s been remarkably effective. Love this document as well!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Timothy M. Chester
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:05 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] CIO Reporting

 

Paige,

 

As Vice President, I write a monthly communication to our president, vice presidents, deans, and cabinet regarding key initiatives. See examples here - 

 

 

A few thoughts about this -

 

a) It’s not a newsletter, it’s written as a personal executive to executive communication on key things that executives and Units heads need to know.

 

b) For the audience, it’s designed to provide them at the first of each month with an executive summary of key things, items they should stress at their own staff meetings, and it provides them the opportunity “speak up” if any of the items poses challenges or there are other things they need to bring up to me.

 

c) For my Units, it provides us the chance to “tell our own story” otherwise the story and defining narrative about our work, initiatives, strategies, will be told by someone else outside our Units.

 

d) It provides a nice “journal” of sorts that over time can provide fodder for annual reports, etc. In fact, you can go back for the 10 years I have been a CIO (at 3 institutions) and see a chronology of key initiatives, challenges, actions, and results.

 

For our audience, I believe they have found it to be an effective and necessary way to catch up each month with what is going on. For myself and my Units, it provides us a way to effectively communicate at the sr. most level of the institution.

 

I think the key principle is - the CIO and their teams will be defined by a narrative. The question is - are you seizing control over that narrative?

 

Best,

 

Tim 

 

Francis:

 

Attached is a document listing the KPIs that we track and report.  I wouldn’t say that they have any oomph especially after leadership has seen the first report.  What I have found is that selected KPIs reported at key times have plenty of value.  For example, there was great interest for a while on call center performance.  There was quite a bit of interest during the time that everyone was engaged in performance improvement.  Now that the numbers are good, the interest has waned.

 

As for naming the top-three, it will always be the numbers on the systems that have had a recent outage.  It helps to restore faith in the work IT does to meet service level expectations.

 

Craig

 

=========================================

J. Craig Klimczak, D.V.M., M.S.

Vice Chancellor for Technology and Educational Support Services

St. Louis Community College

300 South Broadway

St. Louis, MO  63102

 

Phone:  (314) 539-5436

Email:   cklimczak@stlcc.edu    

 

Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Paige,

For each project we monitor the following:

Challenges:

Outcomes:

Lessons Learned:


Next Steps:


Score Card

Percent Complete:

 

Sponsor:

 

OCT Group:

 

(REDACTED)Expense Code:

 

Department Budget:

 

Budget Amount:

 

QC Strategic Plan:

 

TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY:

 

CENTRAL OFFICE   PERFORMANCE MGT PLAN:

 

Middle States PRR:

 

NCATE, ALA et al

 



We also measure the project activity agains the funding source, get earned value,  accreditations, strategic plans for IT , the College, and the University.

This is to maintain alignment.

On the operations side:

We look at 

Availability of Service to the end user not uptime
# of Help Desk calls
User Satisfaction Surveys

We measure staff competence through testing and training

We measure software and license utilization.

I hope this helps

Best regards,
Naveed



Naveed I. Husain, PMP | Chief Information Officer | Office of Converging Technologies

Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing NY 11367-1597
718-997-3009 | Fax: 718-997-5678 | naveed.husain@qc.cuny.edu


From: <Francis>, Paige <pfrancis@FAIRFIELD.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, December 9, 2013 10:03 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [CIO] CIO Reporting

Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

You raise a good point to remember Paige, what excited IT folks usually is not well understood by non-IT folks.

 

I “report” to faculty and administrators a couple of times a semester on issues that touch them. Things like wireless coverage in classrooms and LMS enhancements. I share with leadership policy issues and questions, talk about bandwidth in general terms. Bottom line is that over the years its almost busy work. We love the stats, the rest of campus just want it to work the way they are used to it working….

 

One final comment. I, as VP, often get from my technical folks files of almost raw data. Files I need to spend time figuring out and interpreting rather that a concise report saying we’d had 527 attempts to bridge firewall last week (data made up).

 

Best,

Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President – Information Technology, Planning and Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY

New Phone Numbers for Molloy College
Main number:   516-323-3000

Direct number:  516-323-4848

 

Super helpful Naveed – thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

Hi Paige,

 

You might take a look at Gonzaga’s annual report.  I’m really happy with the result – I think we went data heavy, but focused on metrics that (we hope) matter to our users/customers.  I won’t say that it got an overwhelming response from within the university, but my boss refers people to it often.

 

http://www.gonzaga.edu/Campus-Resources/Offices-and-Services-A-Z/Information-Technology-Services/Annual_Report.asp

 

Chris

 

Chris Gill

Chief Information Officer

 

Gonzaga University

502 E. Boone Ave.

Spokane, WA 99258-0095

509.313.3827 / 509.313.3836

gill@its.gonzaga.edu

www.gonzaga.edu/ITS

Information Technology Services staff will never ask for your password. 

Never email your password to anyone or share confidential information in emails

 

 

 

Hi,
It is always interesting to look at the reports from other organizations.  Chris Gill's from Gonzaga is a visually informative and engaging presentation.   Rob Paterson's approach is more like ours.  We tried to engage on numbers and story, but so far it hasn't worked.  We put less time into our annual report (it is available on our web site at www.oakland.edu/uts/vision).

Right now I meet with different key governance groups at different times during the year, for different lengths of time.  I try to cover items that are of interest to them.  I am on the Dean's Council agenda for 20 minutes this week, for example.  That will be the only meeting I've had with them this year.  I am working on something of a story of items that I think would be of interest to them.  Half the group is new, so I'm focusing on "this is how IT is assembled at Oakland University."

Best wishes
Theresa


Hi Paige,

We have an IT advisory group of faculty, staff and students that we present our metrics to.  I'm actually updating these numbers for our January meeting and am enjoying the new CDS reporting (kudos CDS!).

We look at 
our IT budget vs headcount (faculty+staff+students), $X per person
our IT budget vs institutional budget, X%
FTE of IT staff, X FTE average
headcount (facstaffstudent) vs IT FTE, X people per IT FTE

against 4 different peer groups (a metro consortium, state private schools, national 4 year private schools, national Educause data)

We do an annual survey of faculty and staff and look some key indicators from there

How important are IT services to your work?
How satisfied overall are you with IT services?
Then we dig into satisfaction of some dimensions of the IT support received that reflects our concierge-style support model.  
We also dig into classroom satisfaction as we manage classrooms.

-- Scott


Chris:

 

Thanks for sharing this with us.  What an aspirational piece and a great job!

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

Scott Crow
Director of Information Technology

6832 Convent Blvd.
Sylvania, OH 43560
Direct: 419-824-3938
scrow@lourdes.edu

www.lourdes.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you very much Scott.  I’ll pass this on to the person who created it.

 

Chris

 

Hi Paige,

We use the attached “Annual Summary” format to communicate size/scope/volume in Run/Grow/Transform categories, and we also give a preview of what the coming year’s priorities will be.  This is a brochure format so you’d have to print it and fold it to get the visual effect; it has worked well for us; it includes quite a lot of information but doesn’t require that we spend a lot on a larger book format.  I also use it to engage conversations with key product/service providers so they get an understanding of our operation and priorities.

Best of luck!
Susan

 



The annual reports from the Office of Information technology Services at Case Western Reserve University are interesting, informative, and also very impressive.  The reports target a campus-wide audience.

Absolutely worth a look — and worth looking at several years of these reports (all online) to see how the IT goals and  issues of concern at Case have evolved over time.



Casey Green
The Campus Computing Project


==========


Paige,

As Vice President, I write a monthly communication to our president, vice presidents, deans, and cabinet regarding key initiatives. See examples here - 


A few thoughts about this -

a) It’s not a newsletter, it’s written as a personal executive to executive communication on key things that executives and Units heads need to know.

b) For the audience, it’s designed to provide them at the first of each month with an executive summary of key things, items they should stress at their own staff meetings, and it provides them the opportunity “speak up” if any of the items poses challenges or there are other things they need to bring up to me.

c) For my Units, it provides us the chance to “tell our own story” otherwise the story and defining narrative about our work, initiatives, strategies, will be told by someone else outside our Units.

d) It provides a nice “journal” of sorts that over time can provide fodder for annual reports, etc. In fact, you can go back for the 10 years I have been a CIO (at 3 institutions) and see a chronology of key initiatives, challenges, actions, and results.

For our audience, I believe they have found it to be an effective and necessary way to catch up each month with what is going on. For myself and my Units, it provides us a way to effectively communicate at the sr. most level of the institution.

I think the key principle is - the CIO and their teams will be defined by a narrative. The question is - are you seizing control over that narrative?

Best,

Tim 

This is great Tim. We do a one-page tech newsletter via Tumblr. It’s been remarkably effective. Love this document as well!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Timothy M. Chester
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:05 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] CIO Reporting

 

Paige,

 

As Vice President, I write a monthly communication to our president, vice presidents, deans, and cabinet regarding key initiatives. See examples here - 

 

 

A few thoughts about this -

 

a) It’s not a newsletter, it’s written as a personal executive to executive communication on key things that executives and Units heads need to know.

 

b) For the audience, it’s designed to provide them at the first of each month with an executive summary of key things, items they should stress at their own staff meetings, and it provides them the opportunity “speak up” if any of the items poses challenges or there are other things they need to bring up to me.

 

c) For my Units, it provides us the chance to “tell our own story” otherwise the story and defining narrative about our work, initiatives, strategies, will be told by someone else outside our Units.

 

d) It provides a nice “journal” of sorts that over time can provide fodder for annual reports, etc. In fact, you can go back for the 10 years I have been a CIO (at 3 institutions) and see a chronology of key initiatives, challenges, actions, and results.

 

For our audience, I believe they have found it to be an effective and necessary way to catch up each month with what is going on. For myself and my Units, it provides us a way to effectively communicate at the sr. most level of the institution.

 

I think the key principle is - the CIO and their teams will be defined by a narrative. The question is - are you seizing control over that narrative?

 

Best,

 

Tim 

 

Francis:

 

Attached is a document listing the KPIs that we track and report.  I wouldn’t say that they have any oomph especially after leadership has seen the first report.  What I have found is that selected KPIs reported at key times have plenty of value.  For example, there was great interest for a while on call center performance.  There was quite a bit of interest during the time that everyone was engaged in performance improvement.  Now that the numbers are good, the interest has waned.

 

As for naming the top-three, it will always be the numbers on the systems that have had a recent outage.  It helps to restore faith in the work IT does to meet service level expectations.

 

Craig

 

=========================================

J. Craig Klimczak, D.V.M., M.S.

Vice Chancellor for Technology and Educational Support Services

St. Louis Community College

300 South Broadway

St. Louis, MO  63102

 

Phone:  (314) 539-5436

Email:   cklimczak@stlcc.edu    

 

Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Paige,

For each project we monitor the following:

Challenges:

Outcomes:

Lessons Learned:


Next Steps:


Score Card

Percent Complete:

 

Sponsor:

 

OCT Group:

 

(REDACTED)Expense Code:

 

Department Budget:

 

Budget Amount:

 

QC Strategic Plan:

 

TECHNOLOGY STRATEGY:

 

CENTRAL OFFICE   PERFORMANCE MGT PLAN:

 

Middle States PRR:

 

NCATE, ALA et al

 



We also measure the project activity agains the funding source, get earned value,  accreditations, strategic plans for IT , the College, and the University.

This is to maintain alignment.

On the operations side:

We look at 

Availability of Service to the end user not uptime
# of Help Desk calls
User Satisfaction Surveys

We measure staff competence through testing and training

We measure software and license utilization.

I hope this helps

Best regards,
Naveed



Naveed I. Husain, PMP | Chief Information Officer | Office of Converging Technologies

Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing NY 11367-1597
718-997-3009 | Fax: 718-997-5678 | naveed.husain@qc.cuny.edu


From: <Francis>, Paige <pfrancis@FAIRFIELD.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, December 9, 2013 10:03 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [CIO] CIO Reporting

Good morning all -

 

As a CIO wanting to exclamation mark the importance of your area, what kind of metrics are you reporting on? I plan to put together Fairfield University’s first technology-related annual report at the end of this fiscal year and want it to be better than anything out there (smile). What do you report on? What do you measure? If you had to name the top 3 measurable returns, what would they be?

 

Clearly I’m open to any suggestions or ideas. I started doing annual reports at my last institution and they were always well-received, they just lacked a certain ‘oomph!’ and, specifically, excitement outside the technology area.

 

Thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

You raise a good point to remember Paige, what excited IT folks usually is not well understood by non-IT folks.

 

I “report” to faculty and administrators a couple of times a semester on issues that touch them. Things like wireless coverage in classrooms and LMS enhancements. I share with leadership policy issues and questions, talk about bandwidth in general terms. Bottom line is that over the years its almost busy work. We love the stats, the rest of campus just want it to work the way they are used to it working….

 

One final comment. I, as VP, often get from my technical folks files of almost raw data. Files I need to spend time figuring out and interpreting rather that a concise report saying we’d had 527 attempts to bridge firewall last week (data made up).

 

Best,

Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President – Information Technology, Planning and Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY

New Phone Numbers for Molloy College
Main number:   516-323-3000

Direct number:  516-323-4848

 

Super helpful Naveed – thank you!

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

Hi Paige,

 

You might take a look at Gonzaga’s annual report.  I’m really happy with the result – I think we went data heavy, but focused on metrics that (we hope) matter to our users/customers.  I won’t say that it got an overwhelming response from within the university, but my boss refers people to it often.

 

http://www.gonzaga.edu/Campus-Resources/Offices-and-Services-A-Z/Information-Technology-Services/Annual_Report.asp

 

Chris

 

Chris Gill

Chief Information Officer

 

Gonzaga University

502 E. Boone Ave.

Spokane, WA 99258-0095

509.313.3827 / 509.313.3836

gill@its.gonzaga.edu

www.gonzaga.edu/ITS

Information Technology Services staff will never ask for your password. 

Never email your password to anyone or share confidential information in emails

 

 

 

Hi,
It is always interesting to look at the reports from other organizations.  Chris Gill's from Gonzaga is a visually informative and engaging presentation.   Rob Paterson's approach is more like ours.  We tried to engage on numbers and story, but so far it hasn't worked.  We put less time into our annual report (it is available on our web site at www.oakland.edu/uts/vision).

Right now I meet with different key governance groups at different times during the year, for different lengths of time.  I try to cover items that are of interest to them.  I am on the Dean's Council agenda for 20 minutes this week, for example.  That will be the only meeting I've had with them this year.  I am working on something of a story of items that I think would be of interest to them.  Half the group is new, so I'm focusing on "this is how IT is assembled at Oakland University."

Best wishes
Theresa


Hi Paige,

We have an IT advisory group of faculty, staff and students that we present our metrics to.  I'm actually updating these numbers for our January meeting and am enjoying the new CDS reporting (kudos CDS!).

We look at 
our IT budget vs headcount (faculty+staff+students), $X per person
our IT budget vs institutional budget, X%
FTE of IT staff, X FTE average
headcount (facstaffstudent) vs IT FTE, X people per IT FTE

against 4 different peer groups (a metro consortium, state private schools, national 4 year private schools, national Educause data)

We do an annual survey of faculty and staff and look some key indicators from there

How important are IT services to your work?
How satisfied overall are you with IT services?
Then we dig into satisfaction of some dimensions of the IT support received that reflects our concierge-style support model.  
We also dig into classroom satisfaction as we manage classrooms.

-- Scott


Chris:

 

Thanks for sharing this with us.  What an aspirational piece and a great job!

 

Thanks,

 

Scott

 

 

Scott Crow
Director of Information Technology

6832 Convent Blvd.
Sylvania, OH 43560
Direct: 419-824-3938
scrow@lourdes.edu

www.lourdes.edu

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you very much Scott.  I’ll pass this on to the person who created it.

 

Chris

 

Hi Paige,

We use the attached “Annual Summary” format to communicate size/scope/volume in Run/Grow/Transform categories, and we also give a preview of what the coming year’s priorities will be.  This is a brochure format so you’d have to print it and fold it to get the visual effect; it has worked well for us; it includes quite a lot of information but doesn’t require that we spend a lot on a larger book format.  I also use it to engage conversations with key product/service providers so they get an understanding of our operation and priorities.

Best of luck!
Susan

 



The annual reports from the Office of Information technology Services at Case Western Reserve University are interesting, informative, and also very impressive.  The reports target a campus-wide audience.

Absolutely worth a look — and worth looking at several years of these reports (all online) to see how the IT goals and  issues of concern at Case have evolved over time.



Casey Green
The Campus Computing Project


==========


Paige,

As Vice President, I write a monthly communication to our president, vice presidents, deans, and cabinet regarding key initiatives. See examples here - 


A few thoughts about this -

a) It’s not a newsletter, it’s written as a personal executive to executive communication on key things that executives and Units heads need to know.

b) For the audience, it’s designed to provide them at the first of each month with an executive summary of key things, items they should stress at their own staff meetings, and it provides them the opportunity “speak up” if any of the items poses challenges or there are other things they need to bring up to me.

c) For my Units, it provides us the chance to “tell our own story” otherwise the story and defining narrative about our work, initiatives, strategies, will be told by someone else outside our Units.

d) It provides a nice “journal” of sorts that over time can provide fodder for annual reports, etc. In fact, you can go back for the 10 years I have been a CIO (at 3 institutions) and see a chronology of key initiatives, challenges, actions, and results.

For our audience, I believe they have found it to be an effective and necessary way to catch up each month with what is going on. For myself and my Units, it provides us a way to effectively communicate at the sr. most level of the institution.

I think the key principle is - the CIO and their teams will be defined by a narrative. The question is - are you seizing control over that narrative?

Best,

Tim 

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