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I am wondering if any of you have a dedicated IT staff person responsible for your institutions SIS, whether it be Jenzabar, Peoplesoft, Banner, etc. Key administrators are asking me to hire a staff person whose sole responsibility it would be to manage the SIS. I am wondering if this is standard practice. When I say "manage" I can see someone on my staff managing the system, like the database and servers and making sure its functioning properly which I already have. But I think what they have in mind is someone who will act as the key stakeholder and person responsible for User Groups, training and communications. I am wondering if this is really standard practice to have someone like this in IT or to have a position like this at all. I can see the need for a User Group or Task Force, which we already have, but not a staff person whose sole responsibility it is to oversee the SIS. I could be wrong. I would love to know what others have in place for this. Thank you, Monte ______________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned by Marymount California University email security service ______________________________________________________________________ ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

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Monte, At Pepperdine, we have three IT employees dedicated to our PeopleSoft SIS. One serves as a functional lead and the other two are business analysts. These individuals work closely with our functional users, as well as work closely with our PS developers, and sys and data admins. Even though we have a central trainer, the 3 provide some user training as well. We started with one business analyst and now we have three. Compared to Financials and HCM, SIS requires the most attention and effort. Best, Jonathan See Chief Information Officer Pepperdine University 310.506.6256 http://community.pepperdine.edu/it
My institution has appointed this responsibility to the "Director of Enterprise Systems" which reports to the Vice President of Technology Services. This person champions the system and directs the activities of our "Enterprise Systems Operational team". This is in addition to supervising technology staff (DBAs, Developers, Analysts, etc.). The operational team consists of department directors made up of HR, Student Services, Business Office, Educational Services, etc. The team is responsible to make decisions surrounding processes, functions, and standards. (This includes the functions you've mentioned.) If the team struggles to make a decision, then the Director requests assistance from the VP of Technology Services. If the VP can't make a decision, then the VP calls a meeting with the "Technology Oversight Team". This team is chaired by the VP and made up of Deans and Executive Directors. The team will attempt to make recommendations of a philosophical nature to the VP. If VP still can't make a decision, then the VP seeks input from the Cabinet since it's likely a new principle needs to be put into place to help give guidance to the VP and the other two teams. Otherwise, the Cabinet's goal is to empower the VP and the two teams to make operational decisions. I hope this helps. Derek Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
I definitely agree with Paige and Bret! A key idea to understand is that a student information system has more complexity and broader scope of functionality than your finance and HR/Payroll systems combined - throw in your LMS, parking and housing modules and this is still true. A SIS is just the biggest source of opportunity and challenges within your software portfolio. As new patches, updates, versions, etc. come out, it is pretty common for schools to fall farther and farther behind in their use of any software, particularly the SIS. Both IT and user communities have been under extreme staffing pressures for the past few years, seeing many retirements and no back fills. For users, their "day jobs" have them buried just trying to stay ahead of their next impending event (registration, advising, funding, drop / add /changes, etc....). They don't have time to wander through their ERP software to see "what else it can do". The big question becomes: If they don't have the time, who does? Depending on the size of the school, the 'sys admin' role can be one person or several. The two important roles that you should try to staff in some way are: Business Analyst: Someone should be getting out in the user departments, understanding how the work is getting done and then going back to IT to try to see if IT can help automate some of this work. In a package environment, these needs are often addressed by 'turning on' some package functionality or creating some custom report or data view. SIS Champion: Someone should coordinate user SIS meetings, communicate new functionality, escalate issues to the vendor, advocate for user and IT attendance at the user conferences (we always think about the national conferences, but don't forget about the regional ones and, in big cities the local ones). In some schools, a key SIS user, like the Registrar, takes on this role, but if they don't, some should. If you're big enough to have an applications manager, then they are a great candidate for this role. We see lots of schools with an ERP package that has been installed for over 10 years. When we talk with both the users and IT, we find that a significant amount of the functionality within the product is not actually turned on and the users are begging for another package to get the functionality that they already own. We often hear "...we used to have a business analyst/sys admin...". I think this is a very important set of roles at any institution. Thanks! ****************************************** Charlie Moran Sr. Partner & CEO 1215 Hamilton Lane, Suite 200 Naperville, IL  60540 Toll-Free (877) 212-6379 (Voice & Fax) Website:  www.MoranTechnology.com ******************************************  Please consider the environment before printing this email... -----Original Message-----
We have a team of PM/Business Analysts for each functional area, Student, Financial Aid, HR/Payroll and Finance. We also have two Student Quality Assurance staff who do testing, functional level analysis, problem solving on a day to day basis. We'd like one in each area to be honest. However, I don't believe IT should drive functional decisions, so there is also a system (we are system of 13 colleges) level person who coordinates with the college functional users. For example, our system level non-IT Student person works with the Registrars group, the Schedulers etc. Our PM/BA staff participate in those groups, but don't drive the agenda. We do have a Director of Business Technology on the IT side to whom all the PM/BA and QA staff report. Developers and DBAs report to a Director of Development/DBA. And we have a Director of Business Intelligence who oversees the data warehouse. They do have to work very closely together. Julie Julie Ouska CIO/VP of IT Colorado Community College System Julie.ouska@cccs.edu (720) 858-2781 On 12/9/13 6:59 AM, "Francis, Paige" wrote: >We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, >Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have >a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team >as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and >overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each >is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively >as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need >the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all >pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the >functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for >implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and >identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be >folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a >non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for >communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. > >I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. > >If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. > > >Paige Francis, CIO >Fairfield University > >Follow me: Twitter | Linked In >Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com > >CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any >attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain >confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected >from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or >their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, >please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this >message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you >are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of >this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited. > > >
Does the Director of Enterprise Services deal mostly with software/applications or does this position also oversee the datacenter, servers, network, etc that the applications run on?
In my experience, the Director of Network Services manages the sys admin team responsible for all systems. I tend to work better in a department that heavily collaborates and I don't feel like isolating 'all that is SIS' including the backend would work for me. Background: Fairfield U outsourced the entire ERP to Ellucian for 20 or so years. When we eliminated that contract over the summer, we hired the sys admin for the system that had formerly been outsourced. We asked her where she thought she should report - she chose the network team over administrative computing. Why? Systems are systems and you want all systems managed under the same group for security, backup, training, etc. Banner has some unique eccentricities systems-wise, but so do all applications. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
Monte, Hood College is organized with a Functional Advocate for each component of the SIS that serves as the liaison to that office. This person functions as an analyst that learns the business function of that area and possess both database and programming skills. These analysts are cross-trained in another area for backup. Their leader is knowledgeable in all the areas and frankly could fill in for most members of the college community by virtue of her knowledge of the business processes. She adjudicates resource conflicts across the SIS. Neil Fay Hood College
Director of Enterprise Services deals mostly with software and applications. The director of Network and Infrastructure oversees the datacenter, servers, network etc. We are organized by a "separation of concerns" model by lines of service. Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
Hi Monte. What you describe is a responsibility that is distributed across our team that supports our SIS and related systems. Being a very decentralized institution running a single, centralized SIS, central IT becomes the point of coordination between the schools; so we convene user groups (chaired by functional leader from around the institution) and other coordinating functions on behalf of our users. Hope this is helpful. Happy to discuss further. Best, - Geof Geoffrey Corb Deputy Chief Information Officer Johns Hopkins University geof@jhu.edu | @geofdotedu | 410.735.4001 | 410.608.5255 (mobile)
Hi Monte: At Lynn University (we are a small institution with a small IT department) my office is in charge of all enterprise systems including Jenzabar, our SIS. Since we have a small staff we share the responsibilities for most systems administration by area of knowledge. Our DBA is in charge of all databases, our senior application developer is in charge of the web applications (and web portals - JICS), our application specialist are in charge of the SIS (or other applications) higher level, general system configuration and we have power users in different offices that takes on the responsibility to admin and configure specific modules (registrar, accounts payable, etc). The model has worked for us because we are small enough to contain and control the communication. This is true for most of our systems, everyone in my staff "owns" a piece of real state (an applications, bridges, or functionality). But they do wear many hats. As director I am the "owner" of the SIS and makes most higher level decisions like upgrades, new implementations, customizations but our CIO is ultimately the person with the final saying. Few years ago we created a data governance group with representatives from most areas on campus, that meets regularly and talks about changes in processes and how they affect our applications, bridges, billing, other departments, etc. They form subcommittees to work on specific projects. It has been a great resource for IT. They help us prioritize solutions, coordinate efforts, control changes and better utilize our systems. PM me if you have any questions. Regards, Maria Piret Director Information Systems Lynn University 3601 N. Military Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-237-7355 mpiret@lynn.edu Google+ / LinkedIn Please consider the environment before printing.
We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.
Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.
Best wishes,
Theresa


We have a configuration similar to Theresa. Developers are not assigned to any one office. They can, and do, work on any office’s needs. Sometimes all (we also have 8 in that group) are assigned to work on one office’s requests if there is a critical deadline or need (like very late changes to financial aid that needs done in a month). We do not have a business analyst position in ITS or any office at the college, and rely on the director of each office to be the campus expert in their offices processes and procedures. For example the Registrar knows everything there is to know about Student Records operations and if that office is going to change some process they contact ITS to explain the new process and ITS makes the necessary changes. A lot of times it is a consultation process to define the problem and work out the best solution or what technology might best be used.  Documentation of an offices business processes is the responsibility of each office and training of new employees in an office is also the responsibility of each office. There is no one in ITS would could take over the job of the Registrar and do that job.   

 

 

Mike Cunningham

Vice President of Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:26 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.

Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

Xavier also has a configuration like Theresa. We have eleven and one director in our Application Services area which supports Banner as well as roughly 37 other applications across campus.  We are working with our PMO on improving the process for how projects get prioritized for work.

 

Annette

 

Annette Marksberry, Associate Provost and CIO

Xavier University

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Mike Cunningham
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:40 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We have a configuration similar to Theresa. Developers are not assigned to any one office. They can, and do, work on any office’s needs. Sometimes all (we also have 8 in that group) are assigned to work on one office’s requests if there is a critical deadline or need (like very late changes to financial aid that needs done in a month). We do not have a business analyst position in ITS or any office at the college, and rely on the director of each office to be the campus expert in their offices processes and procedures. For example the Registrar knows everything there is to know about Student Records operations and if that office is going to change some process they contact ITS to explain the new process and ITS makes the necessary changes. A lot of times it is a consultation process to define the problem and work out the best solution or what technology might best be used.  Documentation of an offices business processes is the responsibility of each office and training of new employees in an office is also the responsibility of each office. There is no one in ITS would could take over the job of the Registrar and do that job.   

 

 

Mike Cunningham

Vice President of Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:26 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.

Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

I am wondering if any of you have a dedicated IT staff person responsible for your institutions SIS, whether it be Jenzabar, Peoplesoft, Banner, etc. Key administrators are asking me to hire a staff person whose sole responsibility it would be to manage the SIS. I am wondering if this is standard practice. When I say "manage" I can see someone on my staff managing the system, like the database and servers and making sure its functioning properly which I already have. But I think what they have in mind is someone who will act as the key stakeholder and person responsible for User Groups, training and communications. I am wondering if this is really standard practice to have someone like this in IT or to have a position like this at all. I can see the need for a User Group or Task Force, which we already have, but not a staff person whose sole responsibility it is to oversee the SIS. I could be wrong. I would love to know what others have in place for this. Thank you, Monte ______________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned by Marymount California University email security service ______________________________________________________________________ ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.
Monte, At Pepperdine, we have three IT employees dedicated to our PeopleSoft SIS. One serves as a functional lead and the other two are business analysts. These individuals work closely with our functional users, as well as work closely with our PS developers, and sys and data admins. Even though we have a central trainer, the 3 provide some user training as well. We started with one business analyst and now we have three. Compared to Financials and HCM, SIS requires the most attention and effort. Best, Jonathan See Chief Information Officer Pepperdine University 310.506.6256 http://community.pepperdine.edu/it
My institution has appointed this responsibility to the "Director of Enterprise Systems" which reports to the Vice President of Technology Services. This person champions the system and directs the activities of our "Enterprise Systems Operational team". This is in addition to supervising technology staff (DBAs, Developers, Analysts, etc.). The operational team consists of department directors made up of HR, Student Services, Business Office, Educational Services, etc. The team is responsible to make decisions surrounding processes, functions, and standards. (This includes the functions you've mentioned.) If the team struggles to make a decision, then the Director requests assistance from the VP of Technology Services. If the VP can't make a decision, then the VP calls a meeting with the "Technology Oversight Team". This team is chaired by the VP and made up of Deans and Executive Directors. The team will attempt to make recommendations of a philosophical nature to the VP. If VP still can't make a decision, then the VP seeks input from the Cabinet since it's likely a new principle needs to be put into place to help give guidance to the VP and the other two teams. Otherwise, the Cabinet's goal is to empower the VP and the two teams to make operational decisions. I hope this helps. Derek Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
I definitely agree with Paige and Bret! A key idea to understand is that a student information system has more complexity and broader scope of functionality than your finance and HR/Payroll systems combined - throw in your LMS, parking and housing modules and this is still true. A SIS is just the biggest source of opportunity and challenges within your software portfolio. As new patches, updates, versions, etc. come out, it is pretty common for schools to fall farther and farther behind in their use of any software, particularly the SIS. Both IT and user communities have been under extreme staffing pressures for the past few years, seeing many retirements and no back fills. For users, their "day jobs" have them buried just trying to stay ahead of their next impending event (registration, advising, funding, drop / add /changes, etc....). They don't have time to wander through their ERP software to see "what else it can do". The big question becomes: If they don't have the time, who does? Depending on the size of the school, the 'sys admin' role can be one person or several. The two important roles that you should try to staff in some way are: Business Analyst: Someone should be getting out in the user departments, understanding how the work is getting done and then going back to IT to try to see if IT can help automate some of this work. In a package environment, these needs are often addressed by 'turning on' some package functionality or creating some custom report or data view. SIS Champion: Someone should coordinate user SIS meetings, communicate new functionality, escalate issues to the vendor, advocate for user and IT attendance at the user conferences (we always think about the national conferences, but don't forget about the regional ones and, in big cities the local ones). In some schools, a key SIS user, like the Registrar, takes on this role, but if they don't, some should. If you're big enough to have an applications manager, then they are a great candidate for this role. We see lots of schools with an ERP package that has been installed for over 10 years. When we talk with both the users and IT, we find that a significant amount of the functionality within the product is not actually turned on and the users are begging for another package to get the functionality that they already own. We often hear "...we used to have a business analyst/sys admin...". I think this is a very important set of roles at any institution. Thanks! ****************************************** Charlie Moran Sr. Partner & CEO 1215 Hamilton Lane, Suite 200 Naperville, IL  60540 Toll-Free (877) 212-6379 (Voice & Fax) Website:  www.MoranTechnology.com ******************************************  Please consider the environment before printing this email... -----Original Message-----
We have a team of PM/Business Analysts for each functional area, Student, Financial Aid, HR/Payroll and Finance. We also have two Student Quality Assurance staff who do testing, functional level analysis, problem solving on a day to day basis. We'd like one in each area to be honest. However, I don't believe IT should drive functional decisions, so there is also a system (we are system of 13 colleges) level person who coordinates with the college functional users. For example, our system level non-IT Student person works with the Registrars group, the Schedulers etc. Our PM/BA staff participate in those groups, but don't drive the agenda. We do have a Director of Business Technology on the IT side to whom all the PM/BA and QA staff report. Developers and DBAs report to a Director of Development/DBA. And we have a Director of Business Intelligence who oversees the data warehouse. They do have to work very closely together. Julie Julie Ouska CIO/VP of IT Colorado Community College System Julie.ouska@cccs.edu (720) 858-2781 On 12/9/13 6:59 AM, "Francis, Paige" wrote: >We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, >Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have >a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team >as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and >overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each >is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively >as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need >the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all >pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the >functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for >implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and >identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be >folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a >non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for >communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. > >I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. > >If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. > > >Paige Francis, CIO >Fairfield University > >Follow me: Twitter | Linked In >Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com > >CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any >attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain >confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected >from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or >their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, >please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this >message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you >are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of >this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited. > > >
Does the Director of Enterprise Services deal mostly with software/applications or does this position also oversee the datacenter, servers, network, etc that the applications run on?
In my experience, the Director of Network Services manages the sys admin team responsible for all systems. I tend to work better in a department that heavily collaborates and I don't feel like isolating 'all that is SIS' including the backend would work for me. Background: Fairfield U outsourced the entire ERP to Ellucian for 20 or so years. When we eliminated that contract over the summer, we hired the sys admin for the system that had formerly been outsourced. We asked her where she thought she should report - she chose the network team over administrative computing. Why? Systems are systems and you want all systems managed under the same group for security, backup, training, etc. Banner has some unique eccentricities systems-wise, but so do all applications. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
Monte, Hood College is organized with a Functional Advocate for each component of the SIS that serves as the liaison to that office. This person functions as an analyst that learns the business function of that area and possess both database and programming skills. These analysts are cross-trained in another area for backup. Their leader is knowledgeable in all the areas and frankly could fill in for most members of the college community by virtue of her knowledge of the business processes. She adjudicates resource conflicts across the SIS. Neil Fay Hood College
Director of Enterprise Services deals mostly with software and applications. The director of Network and Infrastructure oversees the datacenter, servers, network etc. We are organized by a "separation of concerns" model by lines of service. Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
Hi Monte. What you describe is a responsibility that is distributed across our team that supports our SIS and related systems. Being a very decentralized institution running a single, centralized SIS, central IT becomes the point of coordination between the schools; so we convene user groups (chaired by functional leader from around the institution) and other coordinating functions on behalf of our users. Hope this is helpful. Happy to discuss further. Best, - Geof Geoffrey Corb Deputy Chief Information Officer Johns Hopkins University geof@jhu.edu | @geofdotedu | 410.735.4001 | 410.608.5255 (mobile)
Hi Monte: At Lynn University (we are a small institution with a small IT department) my office is in charge of all enterprise systems including Jenzabar, our SIS. Since we have a small staff we share the responsibilities for most systems administration by area of knowledge. Our DBA is in charge of all databases, our senior application developer is in charge of the web applications (and web portals - JICS), our application specialist are in charge of the SIS (or other applications) higher level, general system configuration and we have power users in different offices that takes on the responsibility to admin and configure specific modules (registrar, accounts payable, etc). The model has worked for us because we are small enough to contain and control the communication. This is true for most of our systems, everyone in my staff "owns" a piece of real state (an applications, bridges, or functionality). But they do wear many hats. As director I am the "owner" of the SIS and makes most higher level decisions like upgrades, new implementations, customizations but our CIO is ultimately the person with the final saying. Few years ago we created a data governance group with representatives from most areas on campus, that meets regularly and talks about changes in processes and how they affect our applications, bridges, billing, other departments, etc. They form subcommittees to work on specific projects. It has been a great resource for IT. They help us prioritize solutions, coordinate efforts, control changes and better utilize our systems. PM me if you have any questions. Regards, Maria Piret Director Information Systems Lynn University 3601 N. Military Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-237-7355 mpiret@lynn.edu Google+ / LinkedIn Please consider the environment before printing.
We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.
Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.
Best wishes,
Theresa


We have a configuration similar to Theresa. Developers are not assigned to any one office. They can, and do, work on any office’s needs. Sometimes all (we also have 8 in that group) are assigned to work on one office’s requests if there is a critical deadline or need (like very late changes to financial aid that needs done in a month). We do not have a business analyst position in ITS or any office at the college, and rely on the director of each office to be the campus expert in their offices processes and procedures. For example the Registrar knows everything there is to know about Student Records operations and if that office is going to change some process they contact ITS to explain the new process and ITS makes the necessary changes. A lot of times it is a consultation process to define the problem and work out the best solution or what technology might best be used.  Documentation of an offices business processes is the responsibility of each office and training of new employees in an office is also the responsibility of each office. There is no one in ITS would could take over the job of the Registrar and do that job.   

 

 

Mike Cunningham

Vice President of Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:26 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.

Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

Xavier also has a configuration like Theresa. We have eleven and one director in our Application Services area which supports Banner as well as roughly 37 other applications across campus.  We are working with our PMO on improving the process for how projects get prioritized for work.

 

Annette

 

Annette Marksberry, Associate Provost and CIO

Xavier University

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Mike Cunningham
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:40 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We have a configuration similar to Theresa. Developers are not assigned to any one office. They can, and do, work on any office’s needs. Sometimes all (we also have 8 in that group) are assigned to work on one office’s requests if there is a critical deadline or need (like very late changes to financial aid that needs done in a month). We do not have a business analyst position in ITS or any office at the college, and rely on the director of each office to be the campus expert in their offices processes and procedures. For example the Registrar knows everything there is to know about Student Records operations and if that office is going to change some process they contact ITS to explain the new process and ITS makes the necessary changes. A lot of times it is a consultation process to define the problem and work out the best solution or what technology might best be used.  Documentation of an offices business processes is the responsibility of each office and training of new employees in an office is also the responsibility of each office. There is no one in ITS would could take over the job of the Registrar and do that job.   

 

 

Mike Cunningham

Vice President of Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:26 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.

Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

I am wondering if any of you have a dedicated IT staff person responsible for your institutions SIS, whether it be Jenzabar, Peoplesoft, Banner, etc. Key administrators are asking me to hire a staff person whose sole responsibility it would be to manage the SIS. I am wondering if this is standard practice. When I say "manage" I can see someone on my staff managing the system, like the database and servers and making sure its functioning properly which I already have. But I think what they have in mind is someone who will act as the key stakeholder and person responsible for User Groups, training and communications. I am wondering if this is really standard practice to have someone like this in IT or to have a position like this at all. I can see the need for a User Group or Task Force, which we already have, but not a staff person whose sole responsibility it is to oversee the SIS. I could be wrong. I would love to know what others have in place for this. Thank you, Monte ______________________________________________________________________ This email has been scanned by Marymount California University email security service ______________________________________________________________________ ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.
Monte, At Pepperdine, we have three IT employees dedicated to our PeopleSoft SIS. One serves as a functional lead and the other two are business analysts. These individuals work closely with our functional users, as well as work closely with our PS developers, and sys and data admins. Even though we have a central trainer, the 3 provide some user training as well. We started with one business analyst and now we have three. Compared to Financials and HCM, SIS requires the most attention and effort. Best, Jonathan See Chief Information Officer Pepperdine University 310.506.6256 http://community.pepperdine.edu/it
My institution has appointed this responsibility to the "Director of Enterprise Systems" which reports to the Vice President of Technology Services. This person champions the system and directs the activities of our "Enterprise Systems Operational team". This is in addition to supervising technology staff (DBAs, Developers, Analysts, etc.). The operational team consists of department directors made up of HR, Student Services, Business Office, Educational Services, etc. The team is responsible to make decisions surrounding processes, functions, and standards. (This includes the functions you've mentioned.) If the team struggles to make a decision, then the Director requests assistance from the VP of Technology Services. If the VP can't make a decision, then the VP calls a meeting with the "Technology Oversight Team". This team is chaired by the VP and made up of Deans and Executive Directors. The team will attempt to make recommendations of a philosophical nature to the VP. If VP still can't make a decision, then the VP seeks input from the Cabinet since it's likely a new principle needs to be put into place to help give guidance to the VP and the other two teams. Otherwise, the Cabinet's goal is to empower the VP and the two teams to make operational decisions. I hope this helps. Derek Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
I definitely agree with Paige and Bret! A key idea to understand is that a student information system has more complexity and broader scope of functionality than your finance and HR/Payroll systems combined - throw in your LMS, parking and housing modules and this is still true. A SIS is just the biggest source of opportunity and challenges within your software portfolio. As new patches, updates, versions, etc. come out, it is pretty common for schools to fall farther and farther behind in their use of any software, particularly the SIS. Both IT and user communities have been under extreme staffing pressures for the past few years, seeing many retirements and no back fills. For users, their "day jobs" have them buried just trying to stay ahead of their next impending event (registration, advising, funding, drop / add /changes, etc....). They don't have time to wander through their ERP software to see "what else it can do". The big question becomes: If they don't have the time, who does? Depending on the size of the school, the 'sys admin' role can be one person or several. The two important roles that you should try to staff in some way are: Business Analyst: Someone should be getting out in the user departments, understanding how the work is getting done and then going back to IT to try to see if IT can help automate some of this work. In a package environment, these needs are often addressed by 'turning on' some package functionality or creating some custom report or data view. SIS Champion: Someone should coordinate user SIS meetings, communicate new functionality, escalate issues to the vendor, advocate for user and IT attendance at the user conferences (we always think about the national conferences, but don't forget about the regional ones and, in big cities the local ones). In some schools, a key SIS user, like the Registrar, takes on this role, but if they don't, some should. If you're big enough to have an applications manager, then they are a great candidate for this role. We see lots of schools with an ERP package that has been installed for over 10 years. When we talk with both the users and IT, we find that a significant amount of the functionality within the product is not actually turned on and the users are begging for another package to get the functionality that they already own. We often hear "...we used to have a business analyst/sys admin...". I think this is a very important set of roles at any institution. Thanks! ****************************************** Charlie Moran Sr. Partner & CEO 1215 Hamilton Lane, Suite 200 Naperville, IL  60540 Toll-Free (877) 212-6379 (Voice & Fax) Website:  www.MoranTechnology.com ******************************************  Please consider the environment before printing this email... -----Original Message-----
We have a team of PM/Business Analysts for each functional area, Student, Financial Aid, HR/Payroll and Finance. We also have two Student Quality Assurance staff who do testing, functional level analysis, problem solving on a day to day basis. We'd like one in each area to be honest. However, I don't believe IT should drive functional decisions, so there is also a system (we are system of 13 colleges) level person who coordinates with the college functional users. For example, our system level non-IT Student person works with the Registrars group, the Schedulers etc. Our PM/BA staff participate in those groups, but don't drive the agenda. We do have a Director of Business Technology on the IT side to whom all the PM/BA and QA staff report. Developers and DBAs report to a Director of Development/DBA. And we have a Director of Business Intelligence who oversees the data warehouse. They do have to work very closely together. Julie Julie Ouska CIO/VP of IT Colorado Community College System Julie.ouska@cccs.edu (720) 858-2781 On 12/9/13 6:59 AM, "Francis, Paige" wrote: >We use Banner as our system of record for everything - Finance, HR, >Payroll, Alumni, Advancement, Financial Aid, Student, all of it. We have >a Director of Administrative Services that manages the entire Banner team >as well as web, reporting, and other administrative applications and >overall vision/strategy. We have a total of 4 technical analysts and each >is responsible for an area with a partner analyst trained comprehensively >as backup. If the idea is to keep the system running, you might not need >the additional headcount. If the idea is to most efficiently utilize all >pieces of the SIS, then an analyst for sure helps find all the >functionalities available within the system, come up with plans for >implementation, document testing scenarios for patches/upgrades and >identify one-off applications in the student area that likely need to be >folded into the SIS, eliminating ancillary apps. It also helps having a >non-programmer as the face-to-face contact with 'the customer' for >communication, training, knowledge-sharing, etc. > >I do believe analysts are an integral part to service and best-use. > >If you have any additional questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. > > >Paige Francis, CIO >Fairfield University > >Follow me: Twitter | Linked In >Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com > >CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any >attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain >confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected >from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or >their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, >please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this >message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you >are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of >this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited. > > >
Does the Director of Enterprise Services deal mostly with software/applications or does this position also oversee the datacenter, servers, network, etc that the applications run on?
In my experience, the Director of Network Services manages the sys admin team responsible for all systems. I tend to work better in a department that heavily collaborates and I don't feel like isolating 'all that is SIS' including the backend would work for me. Background: Fairfield U outsourced the entire ERP to Ellucian for 20 or so years. When we eliminated that contract over the summer, we hired the sys admin for the system that had formerly been outsourced. We asked her where she thought she should report - she chose the network team over administrative computing. Why? Systems are systems and you want all systems managed under the same group for security, backup, training, etc. Banner has some unique eccentricities systems-wise, but so do all applications. Paige Francis, CIO Fairfield University Follow me: Twitter | Linked In Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.
Monte, Hood College is organized with a Functional Advocate for each component of the SIS that serves as the liaison to that office. This person functions as an analyst that learns the business function of that area and possess both database and programming skills. These analysts are cross-trained in another area for backup. Their leader is knowledgeable in all the areas and frankly could fill in for most members of the college community by virtue of her knowledge of the business processes. She adjudicates resource conflicts across the SIS. Neil Fay Hood College
Director of Enterprise Services deals mostly with software and applications. The director of Network and Infrastructure oversees the datacenter, servers, network etc. We are organized by a "separation of concerns" model by lines of service. Derek Bierman Vice President of Technology Services 402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400 NORTHEAST.EDU 801 E. BENJAMIN AVE. | PO BOX 469 | NORFOLK, NE 68702 402-371-2020 800-348-9033 FAX 402-844-7400 This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and solely for the use of the intended recipient(s). If you have received this email in error, please notify the sender immediately by email and delete this email from your system. Please note that any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the College. The recipient should check this email and any attachments for the presence of viruses. The College accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
Hi Monte. What you describe is a responsibility that is distributed across our team that supports our SIS and related systems. Being a very decentralized institution running a single, centralized SIS, central IT becomes the point of coordination between the schools; so we convene user groups (chaired by functional leader from around the institution) and other coordinating functions on behalf of our users. Hope this is helpful. Happy to discuss further. Best, - Geof Geoffrey Corb Deputy Chief Information Officer Johns Hopkins University geof@jhu.edu | @geofdotedu | 410.735.4001 | 410.608.5255 (mobile)
Hi Monte: At Lynn University (we are a small institution with a small IT department) my office is in charge of all enterprise systems including Jenzabar, our SIS. Since we have a small staff we share the responsibilities for most systems administration by area of knowledge. Our DBA is in charge of all databases, our senior application developer is in charge of the web applications (and web portals - JICS), our application specialist are in charge of the SIS (or other applications) higher level, general system configuration and we have power users in different offices that takes on the responsibility to admin and configure specific modules (registrar, accounts payable, etc). The model has worked for us because we are small enough to contain and control the communication. This is true for most of our systems, everyone in my staff "owns" a piece of real state (an applications, bridges, or functionality). But they do wear many hats. As director I am the "owner" of the SIS and makes most higher level decisions like upgrades, new implementations, customizations but our CIO is ultimately the person with the final saying. Few years ago we created a data governance group with representatives from most areas on campus, that meets regularly and talks about changes in processes and how they affect our applications, bridges, billing, other departments, etc. They form subcommittees to work on specific projects. It has been a great resource for IT. They help us prioritize solutions, coordinate efforts, control changes and better utilize our systems. PM me if you have any questions. Regards, Maria Piret Director Information Systems Lynn University 3601 N. Military Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431 561-237-7355 mpiret@lynn.edu Google+ / LinkedIn Please consider the environment before printing.
We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.
Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.
Best wishes,
Theresa


We have a configuration similar to Theresa. Developers are not assigned to any one office. They can, and do, work on any office’s needs. Sometimes all (we also have 8 in that group) are assigned to work on one office’s requests if there is a critical deadline or need (like very late changes to financial aid that needs done in a month). We do not have a business analyst position in ITS or any office at the college, and rely on the director of each office to be the campus expert in their offices processes and procedures. For example the Registrar knows everything there is to know about Student Records operations and if that office is going to change some process they contact ITS to explain the new process and ITS makes the necessary changes. A lot of times it is a consultation process to define the problem and work out the best solution or what technology might best be used.  Documentation of an offices business processes is the responsibility of each office and training of new employees in an office is also the responsibility of each office. There is no one in ITS would could take over the job of the Registrar and do that job.   

 

 

Mike Cunningham

Vice President of Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2013 11:26 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Dedicate SIS Admin

 

We do not have any staff members dedicated to the student information system, or financial, or alumni donor, or human resources.

Instead, we have one team of 8 people (including the director)  who are responsible for technical data integration and development for our Banner environment (all modules), uPortal, uMobile, online routable forms, and data integration with any number of edge systems that require such integration.  If we employ anyone who might be described as a business analyst, the position exists in the functional department, not in central IT.  From the perspective of an employee on that enterprise team, this week the employee might be working on a student system project, next week on a health benefits project.  It is about technical consistency, rather than subject matter consistency.    I think either way can work but you have to look at the entire university culture.  A given university probably couldn't financially support business analysts on the same subject matter in both IT and the functional area.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

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2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


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Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

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