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Message from kathy.cunningham@cedarcrest.edu

Greetings,
 
We have begun considering printing expiration dates on our student ID cards so that they are more of a formal ID, perhaps even good for the photo ID for voting purposes.  We would like to understand how others determine what expiration dates to use, or if you are even considering ding this. 
 
Do you give traditional students four or five years before expiring the card?  Do you shorten the expiration length for transfer students?  If yes, do you go so far as to determine the number of credits being transferred in to make the determination?  If you have a nontraditional adult population, do you give that group a longer time before expiration?  Is this all manual or were you able to automate the process?  On the flip side, if you choose not to print expiration dates on the cards can you explain why? 
 
Thanks for all of your help.
 
 
Kathy Cunningham
Director of Information Technology
Cedar Crest College
voice: 610.606.4635
www.cedarcrest.edu
Skype: kathy.cunningham282
 

Security Reminder:  Always protect your passwords and never share passwords with others.  Information Technology will NEVER request your password or login ID via email.  Any email that does request this or other personal information is fraudulent and you should delete it or mark it as Junk Mail and block the sender.

 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Kathy,
  When we considered that, our Security team vetoed it. They didn't want to be in the "legal ID" business. They made the case that we'd be putting additional private info on the card to make it worthwhile as a legal ID (birth date was one I recall).  Their experience was that businesses wouldn't accept it anyway. We never pursued it with legal. Just another side to think about.
Bill Betlej
Mary Baldwin College

Kathy,

               If a student drops out do you immediately remove them from your one card system? I would question if there is an expiration date, but the card is expired due to a student dropping out which one takes precedence. I could see a scenario where a  student drops out of school then uses the card based on the expiration date and a student employee taking the word of the student and the expiration date rather than the work to see if the card is valid. In the institutions where I have worked the card are expired up to 3 months after the student has separated from the college. This could be anytime during their course of study and not necessarily after a graduation date.

 

Randall Alberts, PMP

Assistant Director, Project Management

Institutional Technology

Ringling College of Art and Design
2700 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, Florida 34234
office:  941-893-2054
fax:  941-359-7615
web: www.ringling.edu

Ringling College - Changing the Way the World Thinks about Art and Design

 

We do not to place a printed expiration date on the card because all internal uses of the card are electronically validated that the card holder is authorized for that function. No need to print something on the card that we don’t use for our business purposes.

We are located in a state that recently changed voter id laws. Our specific law requires that the expiration date for a school id be no more than two years in the future to be valid for voting purposes. We didn’t see a need to prematurely expire our cards since there were other id methods that students had available to them for voting purposes.

We hold to the view that the student id card is primarily to fulfill our internal needs. Our students are most concerned with using their ID off-campus for discounts. We haven’t had any reported problems of any restaurant or software company denying them a discount because it lacks an expiration date.

Adrian Smith

 

Director of Technology

Northland Mission, Inc.

- Northland International University

- Northland Camp & Conference Center

 

Kathy,

 

We do not place an expiration date on the face of the card, but we do imbed one within the card data.  We set the date based on a four year graduation date.  If we receive a transfer student we set it accordingly so it coincides with an anticipated 4 year graduation date, i.e. a junior would have two years.  Our public safety office did request (and we provide) the date of birth on the face of the card for alcohol consumption reasons.

 

Anita L. Brown

ITS Operations Manager

St. John's College

P.O. Box 2800

Annapolis, MD 21404-2800

410-626-2508

Anita.Brown@sjca.edu

 

Annapolis Help Desk email:      helpdesk@sjca.edu

Annapolis Help Desk phone:   410-626-2892

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Betlej
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 3:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards

 

Kathy,

  When we considered that, our Security team vetoed it. They didn't want to be in the "legal ID" business. They made the case that we'd be putting additional private info on the card to make it worthwhile as a legal ID (birth date was one I recall).  Their experience was that businesses wouldn't accept it anyway. We never pursued it with legal. Just another side to think about.

Bill Betlej

Mary Baldwin College

Kathy,

We went through this discussion when we implemented our "one card" a number of years ago and settled where you suggested.  Cards have a five year life from issue.  It doesn't stand alone as strong form of active status (when that is needed it's used with an application that checks on registration status) but is good enough for some situations (like buying a ticket to a student event).

Info on how we handle the "expiry" is here http://www.yorku.ca/yucard/faq.html

Bob

-------------
Bob Gagne   |  Chief Information Officer  |  University Information Technology  
108 Steacie Science and Engineering Library  |  York University    |   4700 Keele St. ,  Toronto ON  M3J 1P3 Canada
T: 416.736.5818   |  F: 416.736.5830  | bgagne@yorku.ca |  www.yorku.ca



From: Kathy Cunningham <Kathy.Cunningham@CEDARCREST.EDU>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Date: 2012/06/01 03:18 PM
Subject: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards
Sent by: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>




Greetings,
 
We have begun considering printing expiration dates on our student ID cards so that they are more of a formal ID, perhaps even good for the photo ID for voting purposes.  We would like to understand how others determine what expiration dates to use, or if you are even considering ding this.  
 
Do you give traditional students four or five years before expiring the card?  Do you shorten the expiration length for transfer students?  If yes, do you go so far as to determine the number of credits being transferred in to make the determination?  If you have a nontraditional adult population, do you give that group a longer time before expiration?  Is this all manual or were you able to automate the process?  On the flip side, if you choose not to print expiration dates on the cards can you explain why?  
 
Thanks for all of your help.
 
 
Kathy Cunningham
Director of Information Technology
Cedar Crest College
voice: 610.606.4635
www.cedarcrest.edu
Skype: kathy.cunningham282
 
Security Reminder:  Always protect your passwords and never share passwords with others.  Information Technology will NEVER request your password or login ID via email.  Any email that does request this or other personal information is fraudulent and you should delete it or mark it as Junk Mail and block the sender.

 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from dthibeau@post03.curry.edu

We do not include expiration dates on the ID cards.  As with Adrian, all our internal systems validate the user.  Even though the cards can be used as debit cards, if the card is invalid, there would be no available funds.  As for using them for voting, I had to chuckle at that.  I am from the state of MA where it is illegal to even ask for an ID from a person who goes to vote.  Since this isn’t a political forum, I will say no more on that. J

Dennis Thibeault, Curry College

Did you make date of birth a FERPA-defined piece of 'Directory Information'? If not, you might want to check with your General Counsel. According to some definitions, ID cards are public documents.

Geoffrey S. Nathan
Faculty Liaison, C&IT
and Professor, Linguistics Program
http://blogs.wayne.edu/proftech/
+1 (313) 577-1259 (C&IT)
+1 (313) 577-8621 (English/Linguistics)

From: "Anita Brown" <Anita.Brown@SJCA.EDU>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2012 3:31:36 PM
Subject: Re: Expiration Dates on ID Cards

Kathy,

 

We do not place an expiration date on the face of the card, but we do imbed one within the card data.  We set the date based on a four year graduation date.  If we receive a transfer student we set it accordingly so it coincides with an anticipated 4 year graduation date, i.e. a junior would have two years.  Our public safety office did request (and we provide) the date of birth on the face of the card for alcohol consumption reasons.

 

Anita L. Brown

ITS Operations Manager

St. John's College

P.O. Box 2800

Annapolis, MD 21404-2800

410-626-2508

Anita.Brown@sjca.edu

 

Annapolis Help Desk email:      helpdesk@sjca.edu

Annapolis Help Desk phone:   410-626-2892

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Betlej
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 3:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards

 

Kathy,

  When we considered that, our Security team vetoed it. They didn't want to be in the "legal ID" business. They made the case that we'd be putting additional private info on the card to make it worthwhile as a legal ID (birth date was one I recall).  Their experience was that businesses wouldn't accept it anyway. We never pursued it with legal. Just another side to think about.

Bill Betlej

Mary Baldwin College

We did not place an expiration date on our ID card either. We live in a state where campus ID cards may be used as official id for voting purposes and an expiration date must be on the card, either as a part of the print or in the form of a sticker placed on the card. We use a semester by semester sticker system (a throwback to before we started using the current ID system). Our stickers include the semester (fall, spring, summer) and the year. Since the voter id regulations were passed we decided to stay with this procedure for now to accommodate those students desiring to use this for local voting. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:ADF9BBE4-3038-414B-831B-6B3F170AC06C] Need Assistance? Call Oops (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Kathy Cunningham > Reply-To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > Subject: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards Greetings, We have begun considering printing expiration dates on our student ID cards so that they are more of a formal ID, perhaps even good for the photo ID for voting purposes. We would like to understand how others determine what expiration dates to use, or if you are even considering ding this. Do you give traditional students four or five years before expiring the card? Do you shorten the expiration length for transfer students? If yes, do you go so far as to determine the number of credits being transferred in to make the determination? If you have a nontraditional adult population, do you give that group a longer time before expiration? Is this all manual or were you able to automate the process? On the flip side, if you choose not to print expiration dates on the cards can you explain why? Thanks for all of your help. Kathy Cunningham Director of Information Technology Cedar Crest College voice: 610.606.4635 www.cedarcrest.edu Skype: kathy.cunningham282 Security Reminder: Always protect your passwords and never share passwords with others. Information Technology will NEVER request your password or login ID via email. Any email that does request this or other personal information is fraudulent and you should delete it or mark it as Junk Mail and block the sender. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Message from mike.cunningham@pct.edu

I don’t think ID cards are public documents. What you’re saying is that my credit card should not have my credit card number on it since it is a public document. My ID card, like my credit card, should never leave my possession.

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Geoff Nathan
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 3:50 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards

 

Did you make date of birth a FERPA-defined piece of 'Directory Information'? If not, you might want to check with your General Counsel. According to some definitions, ID cards are public documents.

Geoffrey S. Nathan
Faculty Liaison, C&IT
and Professor, Linguistics Program
http://blogs.wayne.edu/proftech/
+1 (313) 577-1259 (C&IT)
+1 (313) 577-8621 (English/Linguistics)

 

From: "Anita Brown" <Anita.Brown@SJCA.EDU>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2012 3:31:36 PM
Subject: Re: Expiration Dates on ID Cards

Kathy,

 

We do not place an expiration date on the face of the card, but we do imbed one within the card data.  We set the date based on a four year graduation date.  If we receive a transfer student we set it accordingly so it coincides with an anticipated 4 year graduation date, i.e. a junior would have two years.  Our public safety office did request (and we provide) the date of birth on the face of the card for alcohol consumption reasons.

 

Anita L. Brown

ITS Operations Manager

St. John's College

P.O. Box 2800

Annapolis, MD 21404-2800

410-626-2508

Anita.Brown@sjca.edu

 

Annapolis Help Desk email:      helpdesk@sjca.edu

Annapolis Help Desk phone:   410-626-2892

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Bill Betlej
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 3:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Expiration Dates on ID Cards

 

Kathy,

  When we considered that, our Security team vetoed it. They didn't want to be in the "legal ID" business. They made the case that we'd be putting additional private info on the card to make it worthwhile as a legal ID (birth date was one I recall).  Their experience was that businesses wouldn't accept it anyway. We never pursued it with legal. Just another side to think about.

Bill Betlej

Mary Baldwin College

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