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Hi everyone

We migrated faculty/staff to Google Apps in July.  We have run into an issue with access to our Google Apps environment from Iran, which is a sanctioned country.  Because of this, I am now learning more about Export Control laws and am now writing to the list to ask if your institution has a specific policy or guidelines in regards to Export Control Laws.  If so, could you send me a copy or point me to a website? 

Thanks in advance.

Ellen

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Ellen Yu Borkowski
Chief Information Officer
Information Technology Services

Union College
807 Union St.
Schenectady, NY  12308
Office: 518.388.6293
Fax: 518.388.6470
Email: eyb@union.edu
Web: http://its.union.edu

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Comments

Hi Ellen! Here are some UCLA resources that may be helpful:

 

·        Export Control Regulations: A Quick Guide for Faculty and Staff

o   Memo

o   National Security Regulations and Related Policies

·        Export Control Training: What We Need to Know

·        Export Controls Decision Tree

 

On the related matter of traveling internationally with your laptop:

 

·        Bring Your Own Laptop (and other Devices) – This is a PowerPoint slide deck that I’ll send to you separately (and to anyone who is interested pending it being posted).

·        Top Ten Things You MUST Know Before Taking Your Laptop Overseas

·        International Research & Travel Checklist

 

-Kent

 

--

Kent Wada

Chief Privacy Officer

Director, Strategic IT Policy

UCLA

 

 

 

Hi Ellen, The Higher Education Information Security Council has also developed a page with a collection of links related to export compliance and security tips for traveling abroad: https://wiki.internet2.edu/confluence/display/itsg2/Security+Tips+for+Tr... Thank you, Valerie Valerie Vogel Program Manager EDUCAUSE Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good direct: 202.331.5374 | main: 202.872.4200 | educause.edu
What might be worth discussing is how this law is joining copyright, electronic communications privacy and computer fraud and abuse as a law that is not aging well.  

Its original purpose was conceived in the notion of the physical transplantation of encryption breaking software from the U.S. to a hostile foreign government that might use it for surveillance/military purposes.

Where we find it cropping up now is in contracts with cloud vendors who will not promise to keep foreign national employees in our country from working on the systems related to a cloud service (as in someone who is originally from Iran, for example, but has been living in the United States for 30 years and who works in the technology industry) or in enterprise cloud systems that deploy encryption that result in staff or faculty in one of the named foreign countries, let's take Iran again as an example, for either personal or business purposes but who are then unable to access their mail accounts because the company has blocked transmissions as a technical means of compliance.

A catalogue of use cases and adverse effects that these "badly aging laws" have on higher education would be very helpful to compile in preparation for the day that higher education could either take the lead in calling for reform or at least chime in reform informatively and in a way that would serve institutional missions.

Tracy

 
Hi Ellen, The Higher Education Information Security Council has also developed a page with a collection of links related to export compliance and security tips for traveling abroad: https://wiki.internet2.edu/confluence/display/itsg2/Security+Tips+for+Tr... Thank you, Valerie Valerie Vogel Program Manager EDUCAUSE Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good direct: 202.331.5374 | main: 202.872.4200 | educause.edu
What might be worth discussing is how this law is joining copyright, electronic communications privacy and computer fraud and abuse as a law that is not aging well.  

Its original purpose was conceived in the notion of the physical transplantation of encryption breaking software from the U.S. to a hostile foreign government that might use it for surveillance/military purposes.

Where we find it cropping up now is in contracts with cloud vendors who will not promise to keep foreign national employees in our country from working on the systems related to a cloud service (as in someone who is originally from Iran, for example, but has been living in the United States for 30 years and who works in the technology industry) or in enterprise cloud systems that deploy encryption that result in staff or faculty in one of the named foreign countries, let's take Iran again as an example, for either personal or business purposes but who are then unable to access their mail accounts because the company has blocked transmissions as a technical means of compliance.

A catalogue of use cases and adverse effects that these "badly aging laws" have on higher education would be very helpful to compile in preparation for the day that higher education could either take the lead in calling for reform or at least chime in reform informatively and in a way that would serve institutional missions.

Tracy

 
Hi Ellen, The Higher Education Information Security Council has also developed a page with a collection of links related to export compliance and security tips for traveling abroad: https://wiki.internet2.edu/confluence/display/itsg2/Security+Tips+for+Tr... Thank you, Valerie Valerie Vogel Program Manager EDUCAUSE Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good direct: 202.331.5374 | main: 202.872.4200 | educause.edu
What might be worth discussing is how this law is joining copyright, electronic communications privacy and computer fraud and abuse as a law that is not aging well.  

Its original purpose was conceived in the notion of the physical transplantation of encryption breaking software from the U.S. to a hostile foreign government that might use it for surveillance/military purposes.

Where we find it cropping up now is in contracts with cloud vendors who will not promise to keep foreign national employees in our country from working on the systems related to a cloud service (as in someone who is originally from Iran, for example, but has been living in the United States for 30 years and who works in the technology industry) or in enterprise cloud systems that deploy encryption that result in staff or faculty in one of the named foreign countries, let's take Iran again as an example, for either personal or business purposes but who are then unable to access their mail accounts because the company has blocked transmissions as a technical means of compliance.

A catalogue of use cases and adverse effects that these "badly aging laws" have on higher education would be very helpful to compile in preparation for the day that higher education could either take the lead in calling for reform or at least chime in reform informatively and in a way that would serve institutional missions.

Tracy

 
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