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What are Google schools doing now that Google+ is available in Google Apps for Education? Just turning it on? Leaving it off? Planning on turning it on after policy and procedure review and modification and training? Other?

Ted Wilder
Senior Director of Technology
Luther Seminary

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We turned it on at launch.  No special policies beyond our basic "ethical use of computers" policy.

Rick Matthews
Associate Provost for Technology
Wake Forest University

Turned on. As it is an app for education, domain has control as needed and we can, if acceptable use policy or any laws are violated, remove account/content.



John G. Jaffe
Director of Integrated Information Systems/CIO
Sweet Briar College
Sweet Briar, VA 24595

On Oct 31, 2011, at 8:40 PM, "Matthews, Rick" <matthews@WFU.EDU> wrote:

We turned it on at launch.  No special policies beyond our basic "ethical use of computers" policy.

Rick Matthews
Associate Provost for Technology
Wake Forest University

Message from nathan.bailey@monash.edu

That addresses the internal risk, but not the external one? (= you can manage bad users, but you can't manage Google's bad use of your data). I think controlled release is mostly about making sure we're clear with Google about how they are meeting our compliance obligations, since the consumer market doesn't have the same expectations as the higher ed market in this regard. N On 1 November 2011 12:44, John G. Jaffe wrote: > Turned on. As it is an app for education, domain has control as needed and > we can, if acceptable use policy or any laws are violated, remove > account/content. > > > John G. Jaffe > Director of Integrated Information Systems/CIO > Sweet Briar College > Sweet Briar, VA 24595 > On Oct 31, 2011, at 8:40 PM, "Matthews, Rick" wrote: > > We turned it on at launch.  No special policies beyond our basic "ethical > use of computers" policy. > Rick Matthews > Associate Provost for Technology > Wake Forest University > >
We turned on Plus shortly after it became available. We did meet and have discussion looking for any reason not to activate it. Conclusion was that it does not open any new concerns for our Google campus. I can tell you right now that we are blown away by the potential for G+ Hangouts. We are also trying to adapt to this new culture of sharing, it is good but it is different. The bottom line is that Google + is easy to use. Couple that with your email and you finally bridge collaborative sharing and communication with your primary workspace. We are also transitioning an FTE over to Google support (Google Guru) since we have an increasing volume of requests for wanting to do more with Google.

Greg Smith
Chief Information Officer
George Fox University
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We, too, are very excited about Hangouts with extras. My team tried this with a remote employee and it was _fantastic_. Personally, I think that is the value of G+ and I think it is too bad we have to deal with G+ to get it. I also agree the concern is not internal controls - school policy can handle that. There is some training burden in that Google doesn't want public posting from non-person accounts. So, admissions@domain.edu cannot post to G+ publicly, but  - as I read it - could post to the school domain circle or other non-public circles.

While I am not a FERPA expert, my primary concern is the G+ privacy policy. I listened to a FERPA expert at an ACCRAO conference a couple of years ago and he said any third-party data mining of student data that was not at the behest of the school for the school's operations was expressly against FERPA. From G+'s privacy policy:

"We may share aggregate statistics about Google+ activity with the public, our users, and partners, such as publishers, app developers, or connected sites. "

The issue is not that the data is anonymous or aggregated or what the shared data points actually are, but that any student data is being used outside of the school's control/benefit. The +1 Button Privacy Policy has similar language. I do not see this type of language in neither the main Google nor mobile privacy policies, although I read both quickly.

Have campuses wrestled with this?

Ted Wilder
Senior Director of Technology
Luther Seminary