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Greetings all, Based on anecdotal evidence and vague recollections, it is my impression that a number of years ago there was a trend towards hiring private sector business-people into higher ed CIO jobs. Recently (at least within the past year or so), the overwhelming majority of higher ed CIO position postings I've seen state that higher ed experience is preferred. Additionally, a Master's degree is increasingly becoming a requirement, and a terminal degree, such as a doctorate, stated as preferred. Out of not-so-idle curiosity, is the impression of a shift in the hiring of business-people back to those with higher ed experience just an illusion brought on by faulty memory? :-) If not, has anyone researched and documented this? Thanks for any insight you can provide, and have a great weekend! Melissa -- Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu) Director, Network & Operations Services University Information Technology Services University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Melissa, Hi. Great question. I'm curious now. Please let me know what you find out. I recommend checking out Dr. Wayne Brown's work at the Center for Higher Education Chief Information Officer Studies, Inc, who has done considerable research on higher education CIO's. Center for Higher Education Chief Information Officer Studies, Inc. http://checs.org/ - Mac - Keith W. McIntosh, MBA Assistant Vice Chancellor for IT (Acting) ------------------------------------------------- Information Technology Pima County Community College District kwmcintosh@pima.edu

Melissa--

 

I second Mac’s suggestion to take a look at Wayne Brown's work. He asks about highest degree and previous position, though not previous sector.  I believe he also takes a look at current job postings. In addition, in 2011, ECAR published "The Higher Education CIO: Portrait of Today, Landscape of Tomorrow".  You can find the research hub for this study at http://www.educause.edu/ECAR/TheHigherEducationCIOPortraito/236114.  This was published in Oct 2011 for ECAR subscribers and is now freely available.

 

I want to point out that ECAR subscribers will have free access to Wayne’s 2012 reports.  http://www.educause.edu/ecar/subscribe

 

A little more detail on the ECAR study: we found, for example, that 80% of current CIOs have an advanced degree; 25% have a PhD, most commonly at doctoral institutions. (see Fig 4 below). We also found that 75% of sitting CIOs have come from within higher ed and that had not changed significantly from our 2004 study (or 2008 study).

 

Caveats about the ECAR study…we only describe sitting CIOs, not what people are looking for in new hires. For this, please see Wayne Brown’s work. I believe he summarizes current job postings.  Also, the data from the ECAR survey are getting a bit dated, collected in 2010, whereas Wayne collects data every year.

 

Thanks!

Pam Arroway

Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE

 

 

 

In general, as is usually the case, I would think the primary desirable strengths, experience and qualities of a new CIO would heavily depend on the needs of the specific institution (at the particular moment in time and in the foreseeable future), along with campus strategic priorities, structure, mission and everyday campus life. The overall University administration and University IT leadership structure also play a significant role in driving a CIO search :: will the new CIO run both, Academic and Administrative Computing? Or just one or the other? Is the university a member of a larger University system? Is the school a Research I institution? Does it have a Medical School? Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine. Ed Garay Assistant Director for Academic Computing Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab University of Illinois at Chicago www.accc.uic.edu/itl www.twitter.com/garay ** Ubiquitously social...

Ed Garay says. . .  

 

" Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine"

 

Why? 

 

Bill Schleifer

Bill Schleifer

Chief Information Officer

Rivier College

Nashua, NH 03060

603.897.8630

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 11:56 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?

 

In general, as is usually the case, I would think the primary desirable strengths, experience and qualities of a new CIO would heavily depend on the needs of the specific institution (at the particular moment in time and in the foreseeable future), along with campus strategic priorities, structure, mission and everyday campus life.

 

The overall University administration and University IT leadership structure also play a significant role in driving a CIO search :: will the new CIO run both, Academic and Administrative Computing? Or just one or the other? Is the university a member of a larger University system? Is the school a Research I institution? Does it have a Medical School?

 

Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine.

 

Ed Garay           

Assistant Director for Academic Computing Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab University of Illinois at Chicago

 

www.accc.uic.edu/itl

www.twitter.com/garay

 

** Ubiquitously social...

    <iPad>

 

I believe Ed was right on with the (excuse my paraphrase) "it depends" answer.  There are some cases where extensive knowledge in Higher Ed just makes sense – especially research institutions.  It is fairly uncommon for CIOs in the corporate arena to be involved in heavy, diversified research.  And those who would have such experience are likely to be working for large organizations at salaries typically not attainable in Higher Ed.  

However, I do believe that many campuses are being forced into taking a more private sector approach to education in general.  We must do more with less, we must be budget minded, we are seeing more and more unfunded mandates, etc.  IT is not the only place where a business approach on campuses is becoming common place.  How many of your campuses own/run your bookstore?  Or is it contracted out?  Dining facilities? Housing? Online/hybrid classes?  These changes are being made primarily out of a concern for the bottom line.  As such, it makes sense to have CIOs with private sector, business-person experience to help an IT organization migrate to a more efficient, budget-driven state.

Concerning the Master's/PhD trend – I say it's about time!  While I have not completed my MBA (almost there!), I feel that having a graduate degree is definitely beneficial.  I would argue that in most cases the degree should be a business degree (as opposed to a CS degree).  Why?  Because we're talking about CIOs not CTOs.  

More directly to Melissa's question – I have not conducted any research, but I have searched casually lately and have noticed a similar trend. I have assumed it is because there is an IT recovery currently under way in the private sector and it is easier to find qualified candidates within Higher Ed than to attract private IT leadership from without.


Tim Crouch
IT Directory
UT Tyler Innovation Academy


From: "Schleifer, Bill" <bschleifer@RIVIER.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Sun, 8 Apr 2012 22:47:51 -0400
To: <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?

Ed Garay says. . .  

 

" Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine"

 

Why? 

 

Bill Schleifer

Bill Schleifer

Chief Information Officer

Rivier College

Nashua, NH 03060

603.897.8630

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 11:56 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?

 

In general, as is usually the case, I would think the primary desirable strengths, experience and qualities of a new CIO would heavily depend on the needs of the specific institution (at the particular moment in time and in the foreseeable future), along with campus strategic priorities, structure, mission and everyday campus life.

 

The overall University administration and University IT leadership structure also play a significant role in driving a CIO search :: will the new CIO run both, Academic and Administrative Computing? Or just one or the other? Is the university a member of a larger University system? Is the school a Research I institution? Does it have a Medical School?

 

Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine.

 

Ed Garay           

Assistant Director for Academic Computing Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab University of Illinois at Chicago

 

www.accc.uic.edu/itl

www.twitter.com/garay

 

** Ubiquitously social...

    <iPad>

 

In 2011 when asked which degree major a CIO should have, 52 percent of the institution management team (VPs outside IT and CEOs) respondents indicated a technology major.  While 23 percent of the responding CIOs agreed with the IMT another 34 percent of the CIOs indicated the major was not important.





From:        Tim Crouch <Tcrouch@UTTYLER.EDU>
To:        CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU,
Date:        04/08/2012 11:11 PM
Subject:        Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?
Sent by:        The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>



I believe Ed was right on with the (excuse my paraphrase) "it depends" answer.  There are some cases where extensive knowledge in Higher Ed just makes sense – especially research institutions.  It is fairly uncommon for CIOs in the corporate arena to be involved in heavy, diversified research.  And those who would have such experience are likely to be working for large organizations at salaries typically not attainable in Higher Ed.  

However, I do believe that many campuses are being forced into taking a more private sector approach to education in general.  We must do more with less, we must be budget minded, we are seeing more and more unfunded mandates, etc.  IT is not the only place where a business approach on campuses is becoming common place.  How many of your campuses own/run your bookstore?  Or is it contracted out?  Dining facilities? Housing? Online/hybrid classes?  These changes are being made primarily out of a concern for the bottom line.  As such, it makes sense to have CIOs with private sector, business-person experience to help an IT organization migrate to a more efficient, budget-driven state.

Concerning the Master's/PhD trend – I say it's about time!  While I have not completed my MBA (almost there!), I feel that having a graduate degree is definitely beneficial.  I would argue that in most cases the degree should be a business degree (as opposed to a CS degree).  Why?  Because we're talking about CIOs not CTOs.  

More directly to Melissa's question – I have not conducted any research, but I have searched casually lately and have noticed a similar trend. I have assumed it is because there is an IT recovery currently under way in the private sector and it is easier to find qualified candidates within Higher Ed than to attract private IT leadership from without.


Tim Crouch
IT Directory
UT Tyler Innovation Academy


From: "Schleifer, Bill" <bschleifer@RIVIER.EDU>
Reply-To:
The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date:
Sun, 8 Apr 2012 22:47:51 -0400
To:
<CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject:
Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?

Ed Garay says. . .  
 
" Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine"
 
Why?  
 
Bill Schleifer

Bill Schleifer
Chief Information Officer
Rivier College
Nashua, NH 03060
603.897.8630

 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Ed Garay
Sent: Saturday, April 07, 2012 11:56 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?
 
In general, as is usually the case, I would think the primary desirable strengths, experience and qualities of a new CIO would heavily depend on the needs of the specific institution (at the particular moment in time and in the foreseeable future), along with campus strategic priorities, structure, mission and everyday campus life.
 
The overall University administration and University IT leadership structure also play a significant role in driving a CIO search :: will the new CIO run both, Academic and Administrative Computing? Or just one or the other? Is the university a member of a larger University system? Is the school a Research I institution? Does it have a Medical School?
 
Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine.
 
Ed Garay            
Assistant Director for Academic Computing Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab University of Illinois at Chicago
 
www.accc.uic.edu/itl
www.twitter.com/garay
 
** Ubiquitously social...
    <iPad>
 
In my experience (13 years IBM, 30 years higher ed), I've seen a lot of "business" CIOs fail in higher ed. It can be very difficult to transition from a "command and control" environment to one where a committee has to agree to every significant initiative. Also, bottom lines and goals can be very clear and short-term in business, while funding and success is generally fuzzy and over a longer term in higher ed. Finally, in a research university, faculty may be unwilling to work cooperatively with someone they prejudicially don't believe can understand their needs. So I think it can be quite a challenge for a CIO to make the transition, although some certainly can. Rich Kogut On 4/7/2012 8:56 AM, Ed Garay wrote: > In general, as is usually the case, I would think the primary desirable strengths, experience and qualities of a new CIO would heavily depend on the needs of the specific institution (at the particular moment in time and in the foreseeable future), along with campus strategic priorities, structure, mission and everyday campus life. > > The overall University administration and University IT leadership structure also play a significant role in driving a CIO search :: will the new CIO run both, Academic and Administrative Computing? Or just one or the other? Is the university a member of a larger University system? Is the school a Research I institution? Does it have a Medical School? > > Personally, I would always favor a CIO candidate with extensive Higher Ed experience, especially, experience at schools similar to mine. > > Ed Garay > Assistant Director for Academic Computing > Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab > University of Illinois at Chicago > > www.accc.uic.edu/itl > www.twitter.com/garay > > ** Ubiquitously social... > > >
PS.  In 2012, 94 percent of the institution management team survey respondents (other VPs and Presidents) held an advanced degree.






From:        Melissa Woo <mzwoo@UWM.EDU>
To:        CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU,
Date:        04/06/2012 11:44 AM
Subject:        [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?
Sent by:        The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>



Greetings all,

Based on anecdotal evidence and vague recollections, it is my impression that a number of years ago there was a trend towards hiring private sector business-people into higher ed CIO jobs. Recently (at least within the past year or so), the overwhelming majority of higher ed CIO position postings I've seen state that higher ed experience is preferred. Additionally, a Master's degree is increasingly becoming a requirement, and a terminal degree, such as a doctorate, stated as preferred.

Out of not-so-idle curiosity, is the impression of a shift in the hiring of business-people back to those with higher ed experience just an illusion brought on by faulty memory? :-)

If not, has anyone researched and documented this?

Thanks for any insight you can provide, and have a great weekend!

Melissa

--
Melissa Woo, Ph.D. (mzwoo@uwm.edu)
Director, Network & Operations Services
University Information Technology Services
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


This HTML message and any attachments contain confidential Excelsior College information intended for the specific individual and purpose. If you are not the intended recipient, you should notify the College and delete this message. Any disclosure, copying, distribution or inappropriate use of this message is strictly prohibited.  ­­   ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

In my humble opinion, if predictions of (1) an increasing number of CIO retiring within the next 10 years, (2) a decreasing number of people aspiring to the CIO position and (3) a CIO role redefined by cloud services and outsourcing prove true, Higher Education institutions will have to be very creative to mentor, recruit and maintain their technical managerial talent. Regards, Maria Piret Director Information Systems Lynn University mpiret@lynn.edu 561-237-7355
Message from luke.fernandez@gmail.com

As usual I'm coming from left field on this one but if you value diversity of perspective then maybe the following might be useful: I'm reminded of the filter versus mirror metaphors of governance that are sometimes used to describe the differences between the federalists and anti-federalists in intro courses on American government. The filter metaphor (which Madison ascribed to in Fed 10) envisions government representatives as people who "refine and enlarge" the views of their constituents: they don't have to share the same identity as their constituents, they merely have to be wise enough to filter the chaff from the wheat in public opinion to govern effectively. The mirror metaphor, in contrast, idealizes a form of government where representatives directly reflect (e.g. mirror) the identity and view points of their constituents. To the anti-federalists, who ascribed to this philosophy of governance, you'd want to elect representatives who are like yourself for the best sort of representation. How does all of the above relate to the question at hand? Well a little indirectly admittedly. But if you are an academic who subscribes to the mirror ideal than you are more likely to trust a CIO who shares a similar background as your own. This is certainly one reason why when it comes to chairs, and deans and provosts and college presidents, faculty by and large, will favor the candidate with the academic credentials and experience over the one who doesn't have them. And, except perhaps for the university president position, it’s almost always a pre-requisite. CIOs, of course, don't govern the affairs of faculty as directly as these other positions. So faculty will probably give CIOs a little more slack in terms of the mirror measure. But the more CIOs intrude into academic affairs, and the more they actually are perceived to govern over academic interests (as so much of IT seems to these days) the more traction the mirror metaphor of governance is likely to have. This isn't the only framework that's at play when hiring campus CIOs nor perhaps is it the most salient. But it's another keeping in mind while thinking about this question. Cheers, Luke http://itintheuniversity.blogspot.com
Luke - This is an interesting perspective to consider.  At the risk of inserting a twist that represents a tangent, I can't help but wonder if a mirror is as good as a filter to be ready for the disruption -- most all of it tech-infused -- that awaits us in higher ed.  Assuming a certain percentage of the sensational press that surrounds us these days will come to pass, can we count on mirror governance as a means to transform our industry?
 
-Peter
_______________________________________
Peter Greco
Chief Information Officer
Regis University
3333 Regis Blvd
Denver, CO 80221-1099
Learners becoming Leaders in the Jesuit Catholic Tradition
Visit us on the Web at regis.edu
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@listserv.educause.edu] On Behalf Of Luke Fernandez
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2012 3:29 PM
To: CIO@listserv.educause.edu
Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed?
 
As usual I'm coming from left field on this one but if you value
diversity of perspective then maybe the following might be useful: I'm
reminded of the filter versus mirror metaphors of governance that are
sometimes used to describe the differences between the federalists and
anti-federalists in intro courses on American government.  The filter
metaphor (which Madison ascribed to in Fed 10) envisions government
representatives as people who "refine and enlarge" the views of their
constituents: they don't have to share the same identity as their
constituents, they merely have to be wise enough to filter the chaff
from the wheat in public opinion to govern effectively.  The mirror
metaphor, in contrast, idealizes a form of government where
representatives directly reflect (e.g. mirror) the identity and view
points of their constituents.  To the anti-federalists, who ascribed
to this philosophy of governance, you'd want to elect representatives
who are like yourself for the best sort of representation.
 
How does all of the above relate to the question at hand?  Well a
little indirectly admittedly.  But if you are an academic who
subscribes to the mirror ideal than you are more likely to trust a CIO
who shares a similar background as your own. This is certainly one
reason why when it comes to chairs, and deans and provosts and college
presidents, faculty by and large, will favor the candidate with the
academic credentials and experience over the one who doesn't have
them.  And, except perhaps for the university president position, it’s
almost always a pre-requisite.  CIOs, of course, don't govern the
affairs of faculty as directly as these other positions.  So faculty
will probably give CIOs a little more slack in terms of the mirror
measure.  But the more CIOs intrude into academic affairs, and the
more they actually are perceived to govern over academic interests (as
so much of IT seems to these days) the more traction the mirror
metaphor of governance is likely to have.
 
This isn't the only framework that's at play when hiring campus CIOs
nor perhaps is it the most salient.  But it's another keeping in mind
while thinking about this question.
 
Cheers,
 
Luke
 
Message from luke.fernandez@gmail.com

That's a good question. In bringing up the mirror and filter metaphors I don't mean to condone one while condemning the other. Maybe we need a bit of each in campus IT governance? Luke
Well not to be cynical, but neither the mirror or filter model seems to be working in the federal government now, should we expect those methods to do more in Higher Ed? Dr. Robert Paterson Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research Molloy College Rockville Centre, NY 11571 516-678-5000 ex 6443 -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Luke Fernandez Sent: Monday, April 09, 2012 5:29 PM To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [CIO] higher ed CIO role shift from favoring private sector experience back to higher ed? As usual I'm coming from left field on this one but if you value diversity of perspective then maybe the following might be useful: I'm reminded of the filter versus mirror metaphors of governance that are sometimes used to describe the differences between the federalists and anti-federalists in intro courses on American government. The filter metaphor (which Madison ascribed to in Fed 10) envisions government representatives as people who "refine and enlarge" the views of their constituents: they don't have to share the same identity as their constituents, they merely have to be wise enough to filter the chaff from the wheat in public opinion to govern effectively. The mirror metaphor, in contrast, idealizes a form of government where representatives directly reflect (e.g. mirror) the identity and view points of their constituents. To the anti-federalists, who ascribed to this philosophy of governance, you'd want to elect representatives who are like yourself for the best sort of representation. How does all of the above relate to the question at hand? Well a little indirectly admittedly. But if you are an academic who subscribes to the mirror ideal than you are more likely to trust a CIO who shares a similar background as your own. This is certainly one reason why when it comes to chairs, and deans and provosts and college presidents, faculty by and large, will favor the candidate with the academic credentials and experience over the one who doesn't have them. And, except perhaps for the university president position, it's almost always a pre-requisite. CIOs, of course, don't govern the affairs of faculty as directly as these other positions. So faculty will probably give CIOs a little more slack in terms of the mirror measure. But the more CIOs intrude into academic affairs, and the more they actually are perceived to govern over academic interests (as so much of IT seems to these days) the more traction the mirror metaphor of governance is likely to have. This isn't the only framework that's at play when hiring campus CIOs nor perhaps is it the most salient. But it's another keeping in mind while thinking about this question. Cheers, Luke http://itintheuniversity.blogspot.com
Message from prescor@digirom.potsdam.edu

I agree. In Higher Ed you want (IMHO) a CIO who not only has the respect of the Faculty (which doesn't necessarily have to come from being one of them) as well as someone who can "talk the talk" with the technical staff, not only understanding the technology and services being deployed and supported on their campus but being able to speak about them both in an intelligent and informed manner and one which the layperson can understand. Further, they must be effective in dealing with the rest of the institution's leadership/administration. Perhaps some of this can be accomplished with subordinates, e.g., an Academic Computing Director that reports to the CIO. But the right person can be all three--a "triple threat," as it were. I don't know how many of those there are... $0.02, Romeyn -- [Sent from a mobile device--please excuse any typos!] http://www2.potsdam.edu/prescor/signat-url.htm On Apr 9, 2012, at 7:08 PM, Luke Fernandez wrote: > That's a good question. In bringing up the mirror and filter > metaphors I don't mean to condone one while condemning the other. > Maybe we need a bit of each in campus IT governance? > > Luke > > >
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