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Dear CIOs,

 

At the University Campus IT Services, we are seeking to implement an ICT Project Management Office (PMO) and would like to know if any of you have had success in doing so. If yes, we'd be keen to work with you to learn from you if you're receptive to mentoring/allowing us to benchmark against you. 

 

Also, were any of you able to build Agile/SCRUM approaches into your PMO methodology? We're interested in doing this as well and would like to know if you are finding the approach useful.

 

Regards,

 

Nazir Alladin

Director, Campus IT Services

 

The University of the West Indies

St. Augustine Campus

St. Augustine, Trinidad West Indies

Phone: (868) 662-2002 ext 82081

Fax: (868) 662-6071

 

IT Support will never ask for your password. Never email your password to anyone!

 

.


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Hello Anne,

What tool(s) are you using for project portfolio management?

Thanks,

Derek

 

 
Derek Bierman  Vice President of Technology Services
402-844-7060 | derek@northeast.edu | fax 402-844-7400


NORTHEAST.EDU
801  E. BENJAMIN AVE. |  PO BOX 469  |  NORFOLK, NE 68702
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Take a look at this product called hansoft.  Free to higher ed.  We have done some agile development last year with our Sharepoint website migration from 2007-2010.    I think Scrum teams and Agile methodology do not to be implemented to the letter but portions can be adapted to our higher-ed environment as appropriate.


Best regards,
Naveed



Naveed I. Husain, PMP | Chief Information Officer | Office of Converging Technologies

Queens College, CUNY | 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing NY 11367-1597
718-997-3009 | Fax: 718-997-5678 | naveed.husain@qc.cuny.edu


From: Nazir Alladin <Nazir.Alladin@STA.UWI.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thursday, November 21, 2013 11:35 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)

Dear CIOs,

 

At the University Campus IT Services, we are seeking to implement an ICT Project Management Office (PMO) and would like to know if any of you have had success in doing so. If yes, we'd be keen to work with you to learn from you if you're receptive to mentoring/allowing us to benchmark against you. 

 

Also, were any of you able to build Agile/SCRUM approaches into your PMO methodology? We're interested in doing this as well and would like to know if you are finding the approach useful.

 

Regards,

 

Nazir Alladin

Director, Campus IT Services

 

The University of the West Indies

St. Augustine Campus

St. Augustine, Trinidad West Indies

Phone: (868) 662-2002 ext 82081

Fax: (868) 662-6071

 

IT Support will never ask for your password. Never email your password to anyone!

 

.


CONFIDENTIALITY: This email (including any attachments) may contain confidential, proprietary and/or privileged information. Any duplication, copying, distribution, dissemination, transmission, disclosure or use in any manner of this email (including any attachments) without the authorisation of the sender is strictly prohibited. If you receive this email (including any attachments) in error, please notify the sender and delete this email (including any attachments) from your system. Thank you. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Davenport University is 4 years into having a PMO.  It has been an enormous success, especially in years 3 and 4 once people were accustomed to the team's existence.  Our PMO is now routinely called upon to manage projects outside of IT (process improvements that might include automation, revamping our admissions standards, etc).

I'd be happy to answer any of your questions, or put you in touch with the director of our PMO.  Both of us have driven this from its inception.

We use Basecamp and PPMRoadmap.com for our PPM.  Total cost to use is about $400/mo. for both tools at the levels we use them.  I'm sure it started out cheaper, but we are running >150 projects now, so it's gone "enterprise" level in terms of SaaS subscriptions.

Regards!

Brian Miller
V.P. Information Technology Services & CIO
Davenport University
6191 Kraft Ave. SE / Broadmoor Suite 270
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
p. 616.732.1195 | c. 616-821-2618
brian.miller@davenport.edu

Follow us on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/davenportuit
Rate my Customer Service: http://great.davenport.edu/report/bmiller


Pretty rustic—Excel and SharePoint. We created a business case template in Excel that is required for every project; we have a bubble chart in Excel that plots projects in a portfolio “dashboard” and we use SharePoint to publish the portfolio, project details, and project status, with access-controlled work sites for team collaboration. We looked at PPM tools but our maturity level was low, organizational readiness was low, and the potential for cultural resistance was high. I wasn’t comfortable investing in a more sophisticated tool until we could demonstrate value. That’s backwards for some, who use the tool to create the value in the first place, but it was right us.

 

Anne

 

Anne Milkovich, MBA, CGEIT, PMP, SPHR

Associate CIO for Enterprise IT Governance

MSU IT Center, Program Management Office

51a Renne Library Montana State University

P.O. Box 173240 Bozeman, MT 59717

406.994.5715 ofc 406.994.4600 fax

 

Anne … coincidentally, we had a similar (very similar) conversation yesterday touching on the same points you raised.  Low maturity, staff not quite ready  and high probability for failure due to culture/common practices.  I believe a good tool will help shape the process but in tight budget times, putting forth an effort with in-house tools might help us realize and justify the need for a PPM tool at a later point – or come to the realization that the in-house solution does the job.

 

We are going to meet with our CIS department and hopefully arrange for a internship for some of their undergrads to build a project site for us using Share Point.  Hoping it will be a win-win.

 

Thanks for sharing your experience.

 

Anthony

--------------------------------------------------

Anthony J. Santucci, IT Project Manager

Office of the CIO

Information Technology Services

Appalachian State University, Boone, NC

 

At the University of Oklahoma we’ve adopted Innotas (http://innotas.com/) in a SAS model with more of a focus on portfolio management.  Still getting data loaded and everything set up but thus far have been impressed with the tool’s capability.  Eddie

 

We've had a PMO in place for 5+ years and it's invaluable.  Coincidentally we've moved (from Sharepoint) to the same toolset - Basecamp+PPMRoadmap.  Both are excellent (and cost effective).

Bob
-------------
Bob Gagne   |  Chief Information Officer  |  University Information Technology  
108 Steacie Science and Engineering Library  |  York University    |   4700 Keele St. ,  Toronto ON  M3J 1P3 Canada
T: 416.736.5818   |  F: 416.736.5830  | bgagne@yorku.ca |  www.yorku.ca

NOTE: York UIT will NEVER send unsolicited requests for passwords or other personal information via email.   Messages requesting such information are fraudulent and should be deleted.



From: Brian Miller <bmiller@DAVENPORT.EDU>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU,
Date: 2013/11/21 12:32 PM
Subject: Re: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)
Sent by: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>




Davenport University is 4 years into having a PMO.  It has been an enormous success, especially in years 3 and 4 once people were accustomed to the team's existence.  Our PMO is now routinely called upon to manage projects outside of IT (process improvements that might include automation, revamping our admissions standards, etc).

I'd be happy to answer any of your questions, or put you in touch with the director of our PMO.  Both of us have driven this from its inception.

We use Basecamp and PPMRoadmap.com for our PPM.  Total cost to use is about $400/mo. for both tools at the levels we use them.  I'm sure it started out cheaper, but we are running >150 projects now, so it's gone "enterprise" level in terms of SaaS subscriptions.

Regards!

Brian Miller
V.P. Information Technology Services & CIO
Davenport University

6191 Kraft Ave. SE / Broadmoor Suite 270
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
p. 616.732.1195 | c. 616-821-2618
brian.miller@davenport.edu

Like us on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/ITSDavenport
Follow us on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/davenportuit
Rate my Customer Service: http://great.davenport.edu/report/bmiller


The way I read their website is that it’s free for use by faculty and students for classroom projects. Do they also allow this to be used for administrative projectors for a college? The tool does look really nice.

 

 

Mike Cunningham

VP for Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

 

 

 

 

Up to 9 licenses

Thanks – I did see that. We would need about 50 licenses if we were to adopt this  

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Naveed Husain
Sent: Thursday, November 21, 2013 9:58 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)

 

Up to 9 licenses


I think the first thing is to try it. Adoption is hard all at once.  I have a small group that use it. Also, I am sure they would renegotiate the pricing to something cheap. I don't think they have many higher-ed clients.  

Nazir:

 

Unfortunately, with our ever tightening budgets I have not been able to create a PMO.  However, we have implemented the function with my assistant and myself performing the function.  I implemented portfolio tracking on our SharePoint site and continue to refine and enhance the system as we go along.  While the system provides what I need for executive reporting it is cumbersome for my management team to use.  I have developed a specification for a fourth generation version that uses InfoPath Forms and SharePoint Workflows to automate much of the administration.  Ironically, the greatest benefit of this endeavor is that I learned a ton about SharePoint Development.  J

 

Another challenge that we faced with implementing PMO is our technology management team’s lack of formal project management knowledge.  Only a couple of us have had PMI training so we suffer from a lack of common understanding and vocabulary.  Experiencing the problem with us, our Director of Professional Development is funding a PMI course for our management team and next level technology leaders.  So far, the technology management team sees formal project management as a methodology to get us out of the firehouse approach to large number of project requests that we face. 

 

Last year, I worked with the College’s Presidents and Vice Chancellors to establish a project admission process.  It raised awareness of the issues but it still has bugs.  The biggest mistake I made in the process was not establishing a project admission cycle.   Currently, project requests come in continuously precluding us from being able to present them to our Steering Committee and Leadership Team for prioritization.  A cycle would enable us to look at requests in a batch to gather input on priorities.  It would also allow us to communicate to leadership the current level of work being performed.  I hope to implement this process and educate our leadership on its value in the coming year. 

 

PMO is a work in progress that will ultimately bring great value to the organization.

 

Craig

 

=========================================

J. Craig Klimczak, D.V.M., M.S.

Vice Chancellor for Technology and Educational Support Services

St. Louis Community College

300 South Broadway

St. Louis, MO  63102

 

Phone:  (314) 539-5436

Email:   cklimczak@stlcc.edu    

 

We've tried to do this a couple different ways, all unsuccessful.  If you can get a total-campus picture and buy in to your effort, I think you have a good chance for success regardless what technology, tool, or approach you use.  I think it is a culture issue first, then a technical tool issue.  In our campus culture, unless the Project Management is done at a portfolio level including senior leadership and all campus projects, we just cannot justify the overhead and we continue to be held accountable to ad-hoc, unplanned actions at the university level. 

We are moving away from a project-oriented organization, to a service-oriented organization, and emphasizing our ability to be nimble.  Just where we are and what works with our culture.

Best wishes,
Theresa


Message from cdavie@ithaca.edu

Theresa,

 

I’m very interested in your statement

“We are moving away from a project-oriented organization, to a service-oriented organization, and emphasizing our ability to be nimble.”

 

Can you elaborate on what a service-oriented organization is?  We are very interested in finding the balance between good formal project management practices and “being nimble”

 

Chris Davie

ERP Application Architect

Ithaca College

Ithaca, NY 14850

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Friday, November 22, 2013 11:56 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)

 

We've tried to do this a couple different ways, all unsuccessful.  If you can get a total-campus picture and buy in to your effort, I think you have a good chance for success regardless what technology, tool, or approach you use.  I think it is a culture issue first, then a technical tool issue.  In our campus culture, unless the Project Management is done at a portfolio level including senior leadership and all campus projects, we just cannot justify the overhead and we continue to be held accountable to ad-hoc, unplanned actions at the university level. 

We are moving away from a project-oriented organization, to a service-oriented organization, and emphasizing our ability to be nimble.  Just where we are and what works with our culture.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

Craig, I agree the project intake and prioritization cycle you’re describing below is key to getting out of the firehouse approach. I think that would be considered portfolio management, being able to demonstrate results, what’s active and where the resource constraints are, rather than project management, that delivers a project as defined no matter what the priority is. We found that project management methodology was more of a burden that was not service-oriented (to echo Theresa’s perspective), not nimble enough to support our culture. We support functional project managers with optional tools and techniques derived from the methodology but we don’t impose any methodology and don’t staff project managers ourselves. That was also a theme at the PMO Symposium, emphasizing portfolio management over project methodology for better ROI.

 

Anne

 

Anne Milkovich, MBA, CGEIT, PMP, SPHR

Associate CIO for Enterprise IT Governance

MSU IT Center, Program Management Office

51a Renne Library Montana State University

P.O. Box 173240 Bozeman, MT 59717

406.994.5715 ofc 406.994.4600 fax

 

Chris:

 

I too am intrigued by Theresa’s service-orientated organization.  With our limited human resource capital, we have become a more specialized functional organization so that we can better leverage skill sets and still provide operational redundancy.  To accommodate cross-discipline projects, we are a classic Balanced Matrix Organization (PMBOK v5 Definition). 

 

To be more service oriented, we assigned staff to specific business functions.  Unfortunately, this led to the business function lobbying and getting the IT staff assigned to the business function.  At the time, we were in the midst of a major project so the staff were dedicated to that business function.  Since they were hired, trained and experienced in the IT organization, they continued to follow IT policies and procedures.  Unfortunately, they are being pressed to bypass basic operational IT processes and procedures such as change and configuration management.  Yes, it is service orientated.  Unfortunately, it has become a recipe for disaster with the IT folks ready to quit the organization.  

 

The challenge I see in this example is that the business function staff needs to become more technologically competent.  Business functions need Power Users that can lead functional change and leverage ERP investments.  For years, we have told our IT people that they need to have business knowledge so we made the investment to get that knowledge.  Perhaps the better guidance is that business function staff needs to acquire IT knowledge. 

 

A question to the list, “Where does the business function start and the IT function end?”  What new models for IT organizations are needed for the future?

 

Craig

 

=========================================

J. Craig Klimczak, D.V.M., M.S.

Vice Chancellor for Technology and Educational Support Services

St. Louis Community College

300 South Broadway

St. Louis, MO  63102

 

Phone:  (314) 539-5436

Email:   cklimczak@stlcc.edu    

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Christine Davie
Sent: Friday, November 22, 2013 11:30 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)

 

Theresa,

 

I’m very interested in your statement

“We are moving away from a project-oriented organization, to a service-oriented organization, and emphasizing our ability to be nimble.”

 

Can you elaborate on what a service-oriented organization is?  We are very interested in finding the balance between good formal project management practices and “being nimble”

 

Chris Davie

ERP Application Architect

Ithaca College

Ithaca, NY 14850

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Friday, November 22, 2013 11:56 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] ICT Project Management Office (PMO)

 

We've tried to do this a couple different ways, all unsuccessful.  If you can get a total-campus picture and buy in to your effort, I think you have a good chance for success regardless what technology, tool, or approach you use.  I think it is a culture issue first, then a technical tool issue.  In our campus culture, unless the Project Management is done at a portfolio level including senior leadership and all campus projects, we just cannot justify the overhead and we continue to be held accountable to ad-hoc, unplanned actions at the university level. 

We are moving away from a project-oriented organization, to a service-oriented organization, and emphasizing our ability to be nimble.  Just where we are and what works with our culture.

Best wishes,
Theresa

 

This is fast becoming a false-dichotomy.   In Gartner’s “Best and Worst Practices for EA and Application Architecture” they state that over 50% of Enterprise Architecture efforts are a collaboration between business and technical people.   In our Advising Architecture Review Board (AARB), ½ of the team is front line advisors.  The ½ is split between administrators who need to sponsor and fund efforts and technologist who will do the work or scope the work.

Enterprise Architecture is now about aligning business and technology vision, strategy and investment.  It is no longer business telling IT or IT driving business, it is a deep collaboration between the two that is setting strategy and planning investments.   There are very few (if any) business side investments that don’t involve technology and there are very few (if any) IT investments that don’t impact the business side.

You can look at our AARB wiki site to see the type of work we do collaboratively.   


I am happy to work with Theresa to host a joint ITANA / CIO CG Screen2Screen (webinar) to talk about this work too.



Jim Phelps


Enterprise Architect, DoIT, UW-Madison 

Anne:

 

I couldn’t agree with you more that portfolio management is key value proposition.  Yet at the same time, it also engenders a negative backlash as requestors blame us for putting them on a list.  I think we are particularly sensitive to this because the institution has an enrollment decline leading to further budget and resource cuts.  Not many if any are getting everything they want.  On the plus side, demand is high. J

 

Prior to the introduction of portfolio management, we did not have any formal project management methodology or tools.  Portfolio management exposed this deficit to everyone.  Once the college leaders could see projects not making any progress, technology investments not being utilized, and everyone waiting for someone else to take charge something had to be done. 

 

I would hear my staff tell me that we did our part; we installed the system; we are waiting on the business unit.  The perception was that it wasn’t their fault so they were off the hook.  This mentality doesn’t help anyone and certainly doesn’t make IT the preferred business partner that we need to be.  Our investment in formal project management training is aimed at getting our IT managers to think more broadly about their role.  IT project success often means leading outside the lines of IT.  I have one manager who has an academic certificate in project management as well as her Masters in Information Management.  She has successfully led several huge projects where IT was only a piece of the work.  I hope to replicate some of these skills to other areas in my division without creating overhead. My fear of overhead is what has kept me from doing this previously.

 

Thanks,

Craig    

 

=========================================

J. Craig Klimczak, D.V.M., M.S.

Vice Chancellor for Technology and Educational Support Services

St. Louis Community College

300 South Broadway

St. Louis, MO  63102

 

Phone:  (314) 539-5436

Email:   cklimczak@stlcc.edu