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Moving on to Issue #8 on this holiday week:

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/top-ten-it-issues-2012

Issue #8: Transforming the Institution's Business with Information Technology

Many institutions have already used information technology to achieve efficiencies. But "transformation" is a word du jour. Information technology allied with process reengineering and continuous improvement is the pathway to transformation. All aspects of higher education are being transformed, including teaching and learning, scholarship, research, institutional advancement, admissions, and administrative services. Information technology is never sufficient, but is almost always necessary, for those transformations to have both efficient and effective outcomes.


__________

I think this topic lines up tightly with the previous discussion about governance.  If your governance model creates opportunities for leaders to value transformational initiatives then you likely can answer the questions posted on the web site in a positive way, i.e., your institution's strategic plan includes transformative objectives involving information technology (my insert).  

I looked up "transformation" to ground my thinking, and found these phrases:

  • a change or alternation, especially a radical one (World English Dictionary)
  • a marked change, as in appearance or character, usually for the better (The Free Dictionary)

There certainly is a lot of media play at the moment about the perceived need for transformation in higher education.

I came across this overview article about Transformational Leadership:  http://psychology.about.com/od/leadership/a/transformational.htm

I thought this article was useful; even if your college or university culture isn't particularly valuing or responding to transformation of the full educational spectrum at this point, we can add value by demonstrating transformational leadership components:  Intellectual Stimulation, Individualized Consideration, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence.

Theresa



--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

I’m always intrigued with the use of this word “transformation” in reference to higher education. While we all know things are not as they were went we went to college….has anything really changed…I don’t mean in an individual context but systematically, universally…???.

 

Being presently at an institution founded by Dominican Sisters, I am often reminded that the two entities that have changes least over the past 800 years or so have been the Catholic Church and Higher Education…

 

Methodologies may have changed, but I don’t see students coming out of the system being significantly different along a 30 years continuum that I’ve been in the business…

 

But I will be very interested in following the thread of this discussion.

 

Best,

Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

Message from luke.fernandez@gmail.com

Today's Wired article on the UVA ouster and reinstatement of their president seems relevant to this theme: http://chronicle.com/article/UVas-Painfully-Public-Lesson/132701/?cid=at... The word "transformation" is used more than once in the article. See for example the caption in the first picture: "At the heart of the power struggle between Teresa Sullivan and the governing board of the U. of Virginia was a debate that struck a broader chord, about how quickly a historic institution can or should transform itself." What type of transformation should CIO's be supporting? And are there any lessons to be learned from UVA? Luke
And here is how UVA faculty responded to the Board: Siva Vaidhyanathan reveals how much work UVa faculty were already doing in online education and research. http://chronicle.com/blogs/innovations/the-right-way-to-lead-higher-educ... But as I read #8 I thought they were talking about "business" practices more than "teaching" practices....but I could be mistaken.. Best, Rob Dr. Robert Paterson Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research Molloy College Rockville Centre, NY 11571 516-678-5000 ex 6443 -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Luke Fernandez Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 1:11 PM To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [CIO] Issue #8 Today's Wired article on the UVA ouster and reinstatement of their president seems relevant to this theme: http://chronicle.com/article/UVas-Painfully-Public-Lesson/132701/?cid=at... The word "transformation" is used more than once in the article. See for example the caption in the first picture: "At the heart of the power struggle between Teresa Sullivan and the governing board of the U. of Virginia was a debate that struck a broader chord, about how quickly a historic institution can or should transform itself." What type of transformation should CIO's be supporting? And are there any lessons to be learned from UVA? Luke
I think there's a fine line between an institution that is, perhaps, ripe for transformation, and a good candidate for it—acknowledging that it doesn't exactly know what that looks like—and the institution that thinks it does know what the transformation looks like, and as a result aims too low.  The first kind of institution is the kind where most of us would like to work; the latter is the institution that thinks that "if we could only get our ERP to work right we'll be making good use of technology."

And yes, it's certainly the CIO's job to get our institutions into that latter camp.  But as was discussed (or at least alluded to)  during the governance discussion, you can be the best transformational leader ever, but if you don't have the institutional support for that transformation, you're not going to get very far.  Sure, it's partly the CIO's job to communicate the value of IT (and, correspondingly, the presumed need for continued transformation) but there's only so far a lone voice can go.  And without executive interest and support, that lone voice won't go very far.  We need to be sure that our peers in leadership positions understand what transformation looks like.  If we can convince them (or if they come to us already convinced--even better!), then there's interesting potential ahead.

Eric

-- 
Eric Bird
Associate Vice President for Technology and Chief Information Officer
Massachusetts College of Art and Design
621 Huntington Ave.
Boston, MA 02115
ph: 617-879-7878
fax: 617-879-7979
email: eric.bird@massart.edu

Technology staff will NEVER ask for your password, particularly not by email.  Any request for it is a scam and should be ignored.

From: Theresa Rowe <rowe@OAKLAND.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [CIO] Issue #8

Moving on to Issue #8 on this holiday week:

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/top-ten-it-issues-2012

Issue #8: Transforming the Institution's Business with Information Technology

Many institutions have already used information technology to achieve efficiencies. But "transformation" is a word du jour. Information technology allied with process reengineering and continuous improvement is the pathway to transformation. All aspects of higher education are being transformed, including teaching and learning, scholarship, research, institutional advancement, admissions, and administrative services. Information technology is never sufficient, but is almost always necessary, for those transformations to have both efficient and effective outcomes.


__________

I think this topic lines up tightly with the previous discussion about governance.  If your governance model creates opportunities for leaders to value transformational initiatives then you likely can answer the questions posted on the web site in a positive way, i.e., your institution's strategic plan includes transformative objectives involving information technology (my insert).  

I looked up "transformation" to ground my thinking, and found these phrases:

  • a change or alternation, especially a radical one (World English Dictionary)
  • a marked change, as in appearance or character, usually for the better (The Free Dictionary)

There certainly is a lot of media play at the moment about the perceived need for transformation in higher education.

I came across this overview article about Transformational Leadership:  http://psychology.about.com/od/leadership/a/transformational.htm

I thought this article was useful; even if your college or university culture isn't particularly valuing or responding to transformation of the full educational spectrum at this point, we can add value by demonstrating transformational leadership components:  Intellectual Stimulation, Individualized Consideration, Inspirational Motivation, and Idealized Influence.

Theresa



--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I'll put in a shameless plug for an article my President, Freeman Hrabowski, John Fritz, and I wrote for EDUCAUSE last year on Assessment and Analytics for Institutional Transformation. This is much broader than optimizing business processes and deals with identifying the "transformational" levers for your university and then creating a culture of execution that makes sure you do this well. For UMBC it has been around excellence in diversifying STEM and in rethinking the graduate experience.


What was really enjoyable in this article is a pod-cast we did with Freeman, our Provost, and myself being interviewed by John -- http://www.umbc.edu/ER2011.

I think what Mitch wrote in his message earlier today has resonance to this topic. Mitch is one of the few CIO's that has the stature and mandate at his institution to question any business process. Mitch has a process for determining ROI and the IT unit has built the credibility (they are excellent plumbers) so that the campus expects to gain when it makes IT investments. 

Creating these kinds of positive feedback loops where leadership invests in more technology because technology is achieving results is where we would all like to be and speaks to the CIO as part of a leadership team. which Mitch certainly is.

We've seen similar things with Indiana University (McRobbie and now Brad Wheeler) but it rare because it takes the alignment of Presidential vision and CIO execution with being in the right spot at the right time.  If the President fails to create that broader institutional vision it is hard, if not impossible, for a CIO to deliver transformative results.

Jack







Shameless, Jack. Just shameless. ;-). 

I might still argue a unique, not a ubiquitous, situation. As Eric Bird suggested we can take advantage of situations only when the climate is willing. That said, our role is to keep options in front of the organization. Help it make appropriate decisions. 

Dr Robert Paterson 
V. P. I T, Planning & Research Molloy College 

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 2, 2012, at 10:43 PM, "Jack Suess" <jack@UMBC.EDU> wrote:

I'll put in a shameless plug for an article my President, Freeman Hrabowski, John Fritz, and I wrote for EDUCAUSE last year on Assessment and Analytics for Institutional Transformation. This is much broader than optimizing business processes and deals with identifying the "transformational" levers for your university and then creating a culture of execution that makes sure you do this well. For UMBC it has been around excellence in diversifying STEM and in rethinking the graduate experience.


What was really enjoyable in this article is a pod-cast we did with Freeman, our Provost, and myself being interviewed by John -- http://www.umbc.edu/ER2011.

I think what Mitch wrote in his message earlier today has resonance to this topic. Mitch is one of the few CIO's that has the stature and mandate at his institution to question any business process. Mitch has a process for determining ROI and the IT unit has built the credibility (they are excellent plumbers) so that the campus expects to gain when it makes IT investments. 

Creating these kinds of positive feedback loops where leadership invests in more technology because technology is achieving results is where we would all like to be and speaks to the CIO as part of a leadership team. which Mitch certainly is.

We've seen similar things with Indiana University (McRobbie and now Brad Wheeler) but it rare because it takes the alignment of Presidential vision and CIO execution with being in the right spot at the right time.  If the President fails to create that broader institutional vision it is hard, if not impossible, for a CIO to deliver transformative results.

Jack







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