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Kevin Sebolt’s message on Windows 8 made me wonder how many folks are leasing laptop/desktop computers for faculty/staff rather than purchasing.

I’m not sure I’ve seen a leasing program that provided enough flexibility and cost savings to make it a clear winner. 

That said, with reduced budgets, options are pretty important. 

Factors might include:

·         Choices (desktop, laptop, touch… tablet) (Windows 7 or 8)

·         Replacement cycle (three years)

·         Management (adding, removing, replacing…)

·         Cost

If you have a successful lease program you believe has paid off, I would be interested in learning more. 

Thanks,

Floyd Davenport

CIO/Director ITS

Washburn University

Floyd.davenport@washburn.edu

785-670-1970

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Comments

Good points Kyle re: operationalizing the cost and consistency in renewal.  

Wondering about Mac computers?  we're considering restricting choices to PC systems and only providing Mac units if it can be demonstrated that they can't do the equilivent on the PC.  I'd appreciate shares on recent institutional computer replacement policies.  

Earl



Earl C. Parks, Jr.
Executive Director, Gallaudet Technology Services
800 Florida Avenue, NE
Washington, D.C. 20002-3695
202.250.2877



We have been doing fair market value leases for computers (PCs and Macs) in our classrooms and labs for years.  It does operationalize the costs, which is good.  That keeps us from worrying about going into capital budgeting with large requests in a year where the capital budget may be constrained for one reason or another.  Also, given the wear and tear in those rooms, we find that at about 3 years they are ready to be replaced.  We find that we easily get more years out of computers for faculty and staff, so those go into the annual capital budget requests if they feel that they need replacements.  All in all, it has worked out very well for us from a cost and manageability standpoint.

Joseph Provenza

Institutional Technology


Flagler College

 

Four years ago, we initiated a computer exchange program in an attempt to rid the university of older computers and thus reduce the number of help desk tickets to support them.  At first we gave the users the option of choosing a Mac or PC.  We soon found out that many PC users were choosing Macs.  No problem, we thought at first, but then within a few weeks many would ask to swap the Mac for a PC or we would see an order for Parallels, because the user decided they did not like the Mac or they needed to run software that was only available on the PC.

 

We then changed the rules to if you exchange a PC you would get a PC and if you exchange a Mac you would get a Mac.  New faculty would get whichever they prefer.  We do allow exceptions to those departments that have Mac users that could train their employees.

 

Below is the link to the program.  Be sure to click on the links under the “For further information” heading near the bottom of the page:

 

http://www.usm.edu/itech/computer-exchange-program

 

 

djs

 

David J. Sliman

Chief Information Officer

University of Southern Mississippi

118 College Drive, #5181

Hattiesburg, MS 39406

 

Office: 601.266.4190

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@listserv.educause.edu] On Behalf Of Earl Parks
Sent: Tuesday, November 05, 2013 4:08 PM
To: CIO@listserv.educause.edu
Subject: Re: [CIO] Leasing Desktop/Laptop Computers

 

Good points Kyle re: operationalizing the cost and consistency in renewal.  

 

Wondering about Mac computers?  we're considering restricting choices to PC systems and only providing Mac units if it can be demonstrated that they can't do the equilivent on the PC.  I'd appreciate shares on recent institutional computer replacement policies.  


Earl


 

Earl C. Parks, Jr.

Executive Director, Gallaudet Technology Services

800 Florida Avenue, NE

Washington, D.C. 20002-3695

202.250.2877

 

 

We have been operating a leasing program for about 15 years.  We started with the lab computers but over time expanded to faculty and staff so that almost all our computers are on the program.  This is over 2000 systems, both PC and Macs; laptops and desktops.  We have also extended it to classroom technology such as projectors and document cameras.

As noted in previous posts, the costs are about the same as purchasing the equipment but for us the level operating budget and the built in technology refresh are key factors to keeping it going.  There are some more difficult to quantify benefits.  We believe we are getting better than average pricing because we know how many computers we will purchase in any particular year.  This can be up to 800 machines so it gives us great buying power.  We try to stick with one model a year for each form factor so our inventory of parts for repairs is greatly reduced.  We sync our lease period (3 years on computers, 4 on other equipment) with the warranty so that our equipment is never out of warranty which reduces our maintenance costs. 

There are other points but suffice it to say that, in our opinion, leasing works very well if it is done right.  Two things to contribute to the success are separation of the finance provider and the equipment supplier, and asset management.  Selecting a leasing company independent of hardware allows you to choose the terms that make sense financially.  It also allows for a long term relationship so that one can tune operating procedures over time.  Finally it allows you to select any hardware vendor or vendors to meet your need, including mixing all types of technologies.  The asset management is critical to the return of the equipment.  Without it you can face stiff penalties for unreturned equipment.

If anyone is interested in the details of our program feel free to contact me directly.

Perry M Sisk

Senior Director

Information Technology Systems and Support

Saint Mary’s University

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Perry.Sisk@smu.ca

902-420-5474

 

 

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