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Hi,

 

This may be too basic a question for this group but I will ask anyway. 

 

We are considering making 10 minute screen savers, with password to reactivate, mandatory for all of our faculty and staff.

 

What are you doing?

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

 

 

Bill

It is what it is. - - - Don't blink. Life's short.

William E. Kline - Pitt '82 '86 '00

Computing, Telecommunication and Media Services - Office: 814-362-7667

 

 

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Comments

We have been using that model for a few years, after 10 minutes of no activity the computer screen locks and password is required to unlock the screen.

 

Only situation we have made exceptions has been on the instructor computer in the classrooms. If a video is being shown the screen will lock after 10 minutes (no mouse or keyboard activity). That was easy to sort out as the classroom computers are already in a separate group (VLAN) and we created a policy for those computers.

 

 

Todd Jagerson

Chief Information Officer

Dakota County Technical College

Rosemount, MN.

651-423-8518 (office)

612-718-8406 (cell)

 

 

 

Our standard requires locking screen savers after 15 minutes of inactivity. We're still rolling it out as we chose to implement it gradually, but we haven't had many complaints.

--Dave



--

DAVID A. CURRY, CISSP • DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SECURITY

THE NEW SCHOOL • 55 W. 13TH STREET • NEW YORK, NY 10011

+1 212 229-5300 x4728 • david.curry@newschool.edu



Message from dthibeau@post03.curry.edu

Yikes, my users would string me up J.  We have no desktop timeouts at this time.

 

Dennis

 

ICC has a 15 minute lock . For instructors in classrooms, if they use the instructor user name on the podium computer the screen lock does not engage. This login does not give access to private drives and folders or other resources a named faculty member usually accesses.

 

http://www.icc.edu/technologyServices/operationalStandards_passwordProtection.asp

 

 

I don't generally feel qualified to post here, but I can't let this one go.

I encourage everyone to set the timeout to turn off the screen, not run a screen saver. This is easily managed via power settings. There is really no point in running the screen saver program and lighting up the screen when it's not being used. The power saved is not huge,but multiplied by all of the computers on our campuses, it adds up.

MaryBeth Stuenkel

IT Program Manager, ITS Infrastructure Services & Operations
P GO BLUE, LIVE GREEN & KEEP THIS E-MAIL ON THE SCREEN
Eco-Tip: Please consider the environment before printing this email
For more Green IT tips, see our website at sustainablecomputing.umich.edu




We just introduced a 10 minute inactivity screen lock.  We had two people who had an issue, but the reality is that we are preparing for when the majority of faculty return next month.  Since this does impact all faculty and staff, we have been communicating proactively and have the endorsement from the president and executive team.

 

Best regards,

Kev

 

Kevin Palmer

CIO – Columbia College

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of David Curry
Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2013 7:53 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Mandatory passwords on screen savers

 

Our standard requires locking screen savers after 15 minutes of inactivity. We're still rolling it out as we chose to implement it gradually, but we haven't had many complaints.

 

--Dave

 


 

--

DAVID A. CURRY, CISSP • DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION SECURITY

THE NEW SCHOOL • 55 W. 13TH STREET • NEW YORK, NY 10011

+1 212 229-5300 x4728 • david.curry@newschool.edu

 

We have mandatory screen savers/power saver mode that require passwords on all computers except teaching stations, labs and computers connected to scientific equipment where there are valid reasons to not have the computer lock.  Currently we are set to 75 minutes, which is too long in my opinion.  We hope to be able to reduce to 20 minutes in coming academic year.

 

Chip

Chip Eckardt
CIO
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
105 Garfield Ave.
Eau Claire, WI 54701
Phone 715-836-4636 ext. 362381
eckardpp@uwec.edu

 

 

 

Message from dthibeau@post03.curry.edu

This has been great feedback – maybe I can convince our college to move towards a similar timeout.  How do you folks handle a locked classroom computer when the next faculty comes in?

 

Thanks, Dennis

 

We started with a 15 minute time out when we rolled this out, and our users were not very pleased!  We subsequently changed to 30 minutes.  We exclude the classroom computers via group policy.

-Tom


Tom Van Gilder
Director of Technology Support Services
Appalachian State University
Boone, NC 28608
Phone:  828-262-6272
Fax:  828-262-6034
vangildertm@appstate.edu

Having computer issues?  Enter a support request through http://support.appstate.edu/help

At the risk of starting a flame war, how many cases have there been where computers in locked offices were compromised because they didn't have a screen lock enabled?

I could understand the risk for computers in cube farms, since anybody could wander by, and, of course, there are occasionally cases of sneak thieves stealing purses and such when faculty or staff went to the restroom. 

But it's hard to imagine someone sitting down at a computer in a private office and using it to break in to a protected site. And there are much easier ways to insert malware.

This seems a little like 'security theater' to me. The risk is way smaller than the inconvenience imposed.

Geoffrey S. Nathan
Faculty Liaison, C&IT
and Professor, Linguistics Program
http://blogs.wayne.edu/proftech/
+1 (313) 577-1259 (C&IT)

Nobody at Wayne State will EVER ask you for your password. Never send it to anyone in an email, no matter how authentic the email looks.


That was one of the reasons why we do not lock teaching stations.  The other was the various software applications that were poorly written.  Also, in our student labs we do not allow students to lock a computer.  We tried once years ago and students, being creative and smart individuals, would lock a computer thinking they could use it later that day/night.  Of course other students would just hit the power button to reboot the computerJ.

 

Chip

 

Bill,

 

At Dean College after fifteen minutes of in-active the users have to reenter there password.

 

Regards

 

Darrell K

 

J. Darrell Kulesza
Vice President of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer
Dean College
99 Main Street
Franklin, MA 02038

508-541-1864 - phone

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE This e-mail message from Dean College is intended only for the individual(s) to whom it is addressed. This e-mail may contain information that is privileged, confidential and exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you received this e-mail by accident, please notify the sender immediately and destroy this e-mail and all copies of it.

 

I believe NDSU’s computers managed by the Division of IT is 30. For the distributed IT areas on campus, it varies from no policy to various times of inactivity.  I would have liked the managed machines to be shorter, but compromise is always good. J

 

Theresa

 

Theresa Semmens, CISA

NDSU Chief IT Security Officer

Office: 210D IACC

Mail: NDSU Dept 4500

PO Box 6050

Fargo, ND 58108-6050

P: 701-231-5870

F: 701-231-8541

E: Theresa.Semmens@ndsu.edu

www.ndsu.edu/its/security

 

Granted the chances of this happening are low, I have heard of at least one case that involved a custodial staff member. On the technology management side too I suspect it would add quite a bit of work to manage every exception to the rule, e.g. Professor A has an office, do not lock his workstation (what if it is a mobile device, a laptop?), professor B doesn’t have an office, lock her workstation, professor C has an office but is in and out frequently so that workstation should be locked, etc. Natural and large directory groupings already likely exist such as classroom and lab computers, so for those it may be easier to set up exceptions.

 

Ilya.

 

Ilya Yakovlev

CIO

UW-Parkside

 

I wonder if this whole issue would be better managed by education. Tell the users how and why to lock their computers whenever they step away.  There are keyboard shortcuts:  

Windows: Lock the computer: – Windows Logo+L

Mac: Put all displays to sleep: Shift-Control-Media Eject (⏏)

 

Kevin

 

Education is always a great thing, however that being said there will be issues anytime you rely solely on end users to do something.  We all have policies for instance not to send PI information via email, but I am sure you have found cases where that has been done.

Given we are talking about computers in general here, also keep in mind portable devices like laptops which have drive encryption.  Without a way to lock the machine and require a password to gain access, you have effectively bypassed any benefit of the encryption software with just a mouse movement or keystroke.  


On 7/31/2013 2:44 PM, Shalla, Kevin wrote:

I wonder if this whole issue would be better managed by education. Tell the users how and why to lock their computers whenever they step away.  There are keyboard shortcuts:  

Windows: Lock the computer: – Windows Logo+L

Mac: Put all displays to sleep: Shift-Control-Media Eject (⏏)

 

Kevin

 

Our lock out is set to 20 minutes. We did this several years back, and at that time IT was wanting to set it to just 15 minutes while others wanted 30 minutes to an hour because of the classroom experience. 20 minutes ended up winning out in the end as the compromise. We did get lots of complaints at first, but that has pretty much gone away. It helped too that this was a Cabinet level decision (if you can believe that).

 

All campus computers use this timeout value, even on the classroom faculty computers. The only exemption that was granted was in our Safety Services department where they use computers to view the myriad of surveillance cameras and such.

 

I thought I might also note that the PCs we’ve been purchasing of late have a 15 minute monitor timeouts from the factory. So this engages before the computer is locked, which is kind of a 5 minute warning. So even though a screen may black out during a presentation, it’s just a mouse move or key press to start it back up. Faculty grumble about that from time to time, but they deal with it. This is just a way of life here now as people are used to it.

 

Jeff

 

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