Main Nav


Airplane musings.

 

If there were a development and deployment grid, and one axis was Technology and the other one was Practical use, it might look like the grid below.

So I ponder:

·         What percentage of our effort should be spent in each of the areas?

·         Into which quadrant do our current development/deployment efforts fall?

·         In which grid(s) would you rather spend your time?

 

Business/Education Use

No Known Application

 

 

 

 

 

Known Strategic

(Differentiating)

 

 

 

 

 

Common Known

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commodity

Cutting Edge

Innovative

 

 

Technical Maturity

 

The real purpose of this grid is to pose the following questions:

1)      Who is there among us to create the next solution?

2)      Who is there among us to answer the question that hasn’t yet been asked?

3)      Where will the next transformation in education come from?

 

Example: (Only an example)

How long will it be before the industry realizes that that we really don’t need $X00,000 ERP systems to recruit, matriculate, educate and graduate 21st century scholars?

                How long before each of those words leaves our vocabulary?

 

 

DP Harris, Phd—Vice President/CIO

LOMA LINDA UNIVERSITY | Information Services

 

11139 Anderson Street, Loma Linda, California 92350

(909) 558-7600

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Comments

Thanks for posting a thought-provoking grid.  I note your comment: 

"The real purpose of this grid is to pose the following questions:

1)      Who is there among us to create the next solution?

2)      Who is there among us to answer the question that hasn’t yet been asked?

3)      Where will the next transformation in education come from?"

I would expand that to garnering attention.  Essentially, you've asked three questions that any start-up activity would ask.  Those start-ups also consider visibility, branding, connections.  How many ERPs have come through where we all knew the name of the company before there was really any software to demonstrate?  The name and the company were marketed in advance of vapor-ware solutions (and it continues today).

So it isn't enough for us to know "who is" and where the transformations will come from, but also to ask how we will identify and promote solutions that are real and transformative.  I think that is a strong leadership role that we provide.  There's something like a fourth question that is about leaders providing the insight to identify real solutions, and the negotiation ability and marketing skills to promote those solutions on our campuses.

Theresa







And following up on Theresa comments, this thought process raises a 5th question…. Is this change necessary? Or has the marketing for a solution that may not be necessary already begun? Is your ERP failing? Mine seems to be working OK. We’ve built in the customer self-serve parts….so what kinds of business process are going to happen to force a change? Anyone thinking a “solution” will really be less costly in the long run??? Just questions that come to mind on Wednesday morning…

 

Best,

Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President – Information Technology, Planning and Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY

New Phone Numbers for Molloy College
Main number:   516-323-3000

Direct number:  516-323-4848

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 7:57 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Musings: Who will aswer the unasked question?

 

Thanks for posting a thought-provoking grid.  I note your comment: 

"The real purpose of this grid is to pose the following questions:

1)      Who is there among us to create the next solution?

2)      Who is there among us to answer the question that hasn’t yet been asked?

3)      Where will the next transformation in education come from?"

I would expand that to garnering attention.  Essentially, you've asked three questions that any start-up activity would ask.  Those start-ups also consider visibility, branding, connections.  How many ERPs have come through where we all knew the name of the company before there was really any software to demonstrate?  The name and the company were marketed in advance of vapor-ware solutions (and it continues today).

So it isn't enough for us to know "who is" and where the transformations will come from, but also to ask how we will identify and promote solutions that are real and transformative.  I think that is a strong leadership role that we provide.  There's something like a fourth question that is about leaders providing the insight to identify real solutions, and the negotiation ability and marketing skills to promote those solutions on our campuses.

Theresa

 

 

 

 

 

Yes DP, thanks for posting.

Looking at the questions, I find myself wondering if these are best directed toward us—those managing H.E. IT resources—or better, addressed by the companies and organizations that support and/or supply our educational, technical, operational and business efforts?

If I am honest with myself, looking at your grid, I think most of the efforts I have undertaken while working in four university settings (and am guessing this is the same for others?) would fall into the most conservative fields of the matrix: developing/deploying commodity services for common or known needs. I know this opinion is not sexy or glamorous, and no one becomes a keynote rock star talking about their migration off VMS/Solaris/AIX to IBM/Oracle/Red Hat Linux; upgrading the campus' ERP, LMS or email systems; extending/replacing networks; etc. I would suggest, success in IT—at least as seen by those we serve—is measured by how seamlessly our services and systems are not only integrated into, and complement, the business practices of the institution, but also by how little disruption the implementation of these services/systems cause them operationally (and personally).

Indeed, institutions have created all sorts of internal controls to reduce risk (i.e. project failure, misalignment between technology services and business practices, poor adoption/use, cost overruns, etc.). The best example I can think of to this point is the RFP process, tuned to ensure campuses have undertaken the due-diligence to ensure project success. The lowest risk option is to implement—not innovate: basically find what peers, i.e. similar size institution with similar needs, have done successfully and incorporate (even replicate) that effort, perhaps altering/improving for local needs, skills, as needed, but essentially finding best practices to work from. I think the number of requests seen on this list for examples (templates?) of RFPs for various services and systems exemplifies this point.

I think the true innovations happening on campuses (and in my option where we should be putting effort) are those that reduce the impact on students, faculty, staff (i.e. the user community) as we undertake these IT related efforts, e.g. implement or upgrade a new system or service. My sense is folks (and I'll admit, including me) want to be "tech gurus," "cutting-edge," "innovative," "next-gen leaders" and "disruptive," and to be fair, I am sure there are a few technology projects in all of our careers we can point to as an innovative highlights. But I think(?) most of us would rather hear the stakeholders (our presidents) on our campuses complement us with comments like, "it just works" than "how innovative." Where higher ed IT departments and senior administration can most affect the success of technology to enhance and advance education and business operations, that is, be innovative, I feel would be around:

  • Procurement: what innovative approaches exist to define and communicate requirements, review options, ensure institutional and organizational alignment, foster participation, assess value, etc. in order to find the right solution?

  • Project management: once the solution is identified, what innovative project management methods can be employed to secure successful project implementation in line with the expectations of the institution?

  • Administration and management: are there innovative approaches which can help run and maintain the new/upgraded/enhanced system(s)?

  • Training and support: how are we innovating around the introduction and continued support/enhancement of our newly implemented or enhanced services/systems?

My answer (for what it's worth) to both Theresa's and your question ("...how we will identify and promote solutions..." and "How long will it be before the industry realizes that that we really don’t need..." respectively) is, once we stop chasing "innovation"and "disruption."

Again, thanks for the post DP,
Patrick



On 10/23/2013 07:56 AM, Theresa Rowe wrote:
Thanks for posting a thought-provoking grid.  I note your comment: 

"The real purpose of this grid is to pose the following questions:

1)      Who is there among us to create the next solution?

2)      Who is there among us to answer the question that hasn’t yet been asked?

3)      Where will the next transformation in education come from?"

I would expand that to garnering attention.  Essentially, you've asked three questions that any start-up activity would ask.  Those start-ups also consider visibility, branding, connections.  How many ERPs have come through where we all knew the name of the company before there was really any software to demonstrate?  The name and the company were marketed in advance of vapor-ware solutions (and it continues today).

So it isn't enough for us to know "who is" and where the transformations will come from, but also to ask how we will identify and promote solutions that are real and transformative.  I think that is a strong leadership role that we provide.  There's something like a fourth question that is about leaders providing the insight to identify real solutions, and the negotiation ability and marketing skills to promote those solutions on our campuses.

Theresa



[Disclaimer:  I went back to school to get a PhD in MIS.  That, among other things, may be coloring my thinking.]

 

Hi DP,

 

When I read your three questions (create the next solution, answer the unasked question, and transform education) I thought PhD students.  I had also just read about Stephen Gilfus (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Gilfus) acquiring Adrenna (Drupal based LMS), so maybe the more general thought is students.

 

In a seminar on Monday afternoon, Seymour (Sy) Goodman (http://www.cc.gatech.edu/~goodman, http://www.scs.gatech.edu/people/seymour-goodman) noted that universities, particularly public universities, are in a unique position to offer scholarships, tuition waivers, etc. as scholarships for service.  If you need a beginners mind (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoshin) to ask the unasked question, maybe a student willing to school for service is the right answer.

 

[Although I note that your 3x3 grid reminds me of “Hollywood Squares” which, according to the gym radio celebrated its 47th birthday last week, and had Paul Lynde as the center square, I’m not saying CIOs want to be the center square.]  ;)

-Eric

 

 

IT professionals will never ask for your password – not in email – not over the phone, never.

 

Eric Case, CISSP

MIS PhD student and DHS CDG Fellow

ecase (at) email (dot) arizona (dot) edu

http://www.linkedin.com/in/ericcase

 

DP and Eric,

Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I also loved Eric's comments.  The broad-based BTOP deployment of fiber has made network access much easier for many campuses and coupled with the emergence of cloud services, we as CIO's have an opportunity to be innovative and influence how technology will support higher ed in the future, especially learning and scholarship. Other than the mid-80's when there was the advent of the microcomputer and NSFnet (yes I'm getting old)  there has never been a better time to be a CIO and be innovative in higher ed.

For a lot of these boxes I would say I spend about 1/3  of my time trying to identify and support the innovative use of technology and about 1/3 is taking innovations we do, or the great ones that all of you in the community are doing, and integrate them to become strategic uses of technology (a.k.a production quality services). In this context, a big part of my job could be thought of as technology transfer, I bring the best ideas taking shape in higher ed and work to operationalize them at UMBC.

Even in the commodity area like ERP, I feel my focus has to be strategic/innovative - how do we push the envelope on analytics? Can we identify new uses for imaging or workflow? How are we mobile enabling access for students? How do we position ourselves to rethink financial and grant support for researchers? How can we support chairs and deans with better data on their faculty?

The other comment I would raise on this thread is that it is just as important to be thinking about these boxes in the context of your staff. Great staff want to the freedom and opportunity to be innovative and take risks. I would say 70% of my staff are not pushing the boundaries, they want to do a job well; however, about 30% are really interested in pushing the envelope.  I see my job as CIO as partially being a venture capitalist and knowing who to "bet' on to deliver great results. There are areas that we are doing some really interesting things in that may never completely pan out. We write our own portal in Ruby and we are doing a lot with making this the hub for the social and academic integration on campus. We are doing some early work in learner analytics around mining LMS data to support student success. We use these efforts to help shape vendors work or build collaborations with all of you.

For those of you that would like to move a little further to towards the innovative side of the drawing, we need CIO's, and their staff's, to get engaged in all our organizations -- EDUCAUSE, especially following groups like ECAR ACTI, HEISC, and ELI; Internet2, participating in the NET+ cloud services; InCommon, changing the way we do authentication and access control; REN-ISAC, for security; and IMSglobal for teaching and learning standards.  We need CIO's to roll up their sleeves and get their staff involved to work together to create higher-ed focused solutions. We are in a period where we have the ability to impact the future if we work together.



Jack

Jack Suess             UMBC VP of IT & CIO
jack@umbc.edu     1000 Hilltop Circle
410.455.2582          Baltimore Md, 21250
Homepage:             http://bit.ly/fSB5ID



Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
Register Now!

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.