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My guess is that this is a new CIO position and not just a replacement of an existing one. To determine if a person from the existing organization would even be considered for this position, you should answer these questions. Why has it been determined by the administration that this position should be created? Where does this person report and what powers will he/she have to create transformational change? Is the person a director for just IT or projected to be an institutional leader for the whole organization? Is the existing culture part of the problem that needs to change? Transformational leaders are not usually siting around in existing organizations just waiting to be promoted. If your organization really wants to transform itself then don't play it safe and pick someone who fits into that culture. Have any of you been in a similar situation? I have been the first CIO for organizations that wanted change three times. The organization created the new CIO position to be an institutional leader and expected performance equal to the other C class employees. The role did not exist in the past and more often than not most leaders around the table didn't want to give up the power the CIO needed to make the necessary changes. In all cases, the existing culture was part of the problem and it was a blind spot for many sitting around the table. Small or large failures of any strategic or tactical solutions are almost always related to leadership. Taking the power one needs to help lead transformational change is probably better done by someone from the outside. I am not saying it couldn't happen but if that person existed, he or she would already be leading your change efforts. Mitch Davis CIO Bowdoin College 9600 College Station 308, Hawthorne/Longfellow Brunswick, ME 04011 Office 207 725 3930 Direct 207 607 9932 Fax 207 725 3764 Email mwdavis@bowdoin.edu Admin: Jennifer Wienckowski - 207-725-3277 - jwiencko@bowdoin.edu Good afternoon, I am part of an organization that will soon be onboarding a new CIO. At the moment we are leaning heavily towards promoting one of our existing employees to this position rather than hiring an outsider. This person has the benefit of already knowing our culture, how we do things and how we got here. One of the things that we need the new CIO to do, however, is to lead us in a new direction; doing different things to achieve better results. Have any of you been in a similar situation? If so, could you please tell me what supporting services you think would be most useful to this new CIO in their first 90 to 180 days? How can we take a known entity, recast them as a transformational leader, and help them to achieve some quick wins to reinforce the value of their new vision for our organization? Thank you for your help with this. Sincerely, Christian Advisor to State Department of Education ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Con= stituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/grou= ps/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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I agreed with everything Mitch wrote, until I got to the very last clause. It is entirely possible that someone capable of leading change could be sitting in a position where their ability to lead change was limited. And a promotion might be just the vote of institutional confidence needed -- confidence that the person can do it and confidence that the institution wants to change. Joseph Vaughan CIO/Vice-President for Computing and Information Services Harvey Mudd College vaughan@hmc.edu 909 621 8613 free/busy info at http://tinyurl.com/vaughanfreebusy On 11/18/2011 08:43 AM, Mitchel Davis wrote: > My guess is that this is a new CIO position and not just a replacement of an existing one. > > To determine if a person from the existing organization would even be considered for this position, you should answer these questions. > > Why has it been determined by the administration that this position should be created? > Where does this person report and what powers will he/she have to create transformational change? > Is the person a director for just IT or projected to be an institutional leader for the whole organization? > Is the existing culture part of the problem that needs to change? > > Transformational leaders are not usually siting around in existing organizations just waiting to be promoted. If your organization really wants to transform itself then don't play it safe and pick someone who fits into that culture. > > Have any of you been in a similar situation? > > I have been the first CIO for organizations that wanted change three times. The organization created the new CIO position to be an institutional leader and expected performance equal to the other C class employees. The role did not exist in the past and more often than not most leaders around the table didn't want to give up the power the CIO needed to make the necessary changes. In all cases, the existing culture was part of the problem and it was a blind spot for many sitting around the table. Small or large failures of any strategic or tactical solutions are almost always related to leadership. Taking the power one needs to help lead transformational change is probably better done by someone from the outside. I am not saying it couldn't happen but if that person existed, he or she would already be leading your change efforts. > > Mitch Davis > CIO > Bowdoin College > > 9600 College Station > 308, Hawthorne/Longfellow > Brunswick, ME 04011 > > Office 207 725 3930 > Direct 207 607 9932 > Fax 207 725 3764 > Email mwdavis@bowdoin.edu > > Admin: Jennifer Wienckowski - 207-725-3277 - jwiencko@bowdoin.edu > > > > Good afternoon, > > I am part of an organization that will soon be onboarding a new CIO. At the moment we are leaning heavily towards promoting one of our existing employees to this position rather than hiring an outsider. > > This person has the benefit of already knowing our culture, how we do things and how we got here. > One of the things that we need the new CIO to do, however, is to lead us in a new direction; doing different things to achieve better results. > > Have any of you been in a similar situation? > > If so, could you please tell me what supporting services you think would be most useful to this new CIO in their first 90 to 180 days? > How can we take a known entity, recast them as a transformational leader, and help them to achieve some quick wins to reinforce the value of their new vision for our organization? > > Thank you for your help with this. > > Sincerely, > Christian > > Advisor to State Department of Education > ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Con= > stituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/grou= > ps/. > > ********** > Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Message from bauer.rick@gmail.com

I am not a consultant, but some sort of independent assessment may provide some "independence" for an in-house candidate, and suggest some paths on implementation that may need underscoring. Congrats are in order for an organization savvy enough to look for for excellence right under its nose. Of course, the consultancy/survey/360 review should include all the constituencies, and could surface some areas that previously have been heretofore underserved.

Short of plastic surgery, it might be good to try to try to re-cast your initiatives by this effort.

Something else a Jewish rabbi said about prophets not having honor in their own hometown also comes to mind; good luck!

Rick Bauer, CompTIA

I think that Joseph makes a good point.  Sometimes the vote of confidence sends a message to both the individual and to the institution in support of change.  Internal candidates may have a successful history of leading change, but may have only been able to have impact at a smaller scale.  Recognizing that change history and elevating it can be a strong positive message.
Theresa

I’m just curious. How many of us work on a succession plan to help make it possible for someone within to take our place? This is difficult question. If we do a good job, we may be replaced sooner than we want. Or the person leaves for another job and our work is wasted. On the other hand, if we don’t the institution is not gaining the necessary resources for business continuance and sustainability. What do you all do? God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator ________________________________ From: Rick Bauer Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 13:28:44 -0800 To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO I am not a consultant, but some sort of independent assessment may provide some "independence" for an in-house candidate, and suggest some paths on implementation that may need underscoring. Congrats are in order for an organization savvy enough to look for for excellence right under its nose. Of course, the consultancy/survey/360 review should include all the constituencies, and could surface some areas that previously have been heretofore underserved. Short of plastic surgery, it might be good to try to try to re-cast your initiatives by this effort. Something else a Jewish rabbi said about prophets not having honor in their own hometown also comes to mind; good luck! Rick Bauer, CompTIA
Sam, In the recent past, I was fortunate to be at an institution that recognized the need to do succession planning at various levels of the organization. It was evident that a large number of administrators would become eligible for retirement within the next few years. A formal succession planning process was introduced and leadership development opportunities offered. It was a morale booster in the IT organization as we embraced this initiative. As I left for personal/family reasons, the institution performed a national search and chose the select the internal Associate CIO for this role. Others within the organization were prepared to step up and it continues to flourish under great leadership. Paraphrasing some wise person whose name I can't remember, our success depends on surrounding ourselves with people who are smarter than us. I guess we have to feel safe in our skin to help develop others and then it is up to them to prove themselves. If the institution doesn't see value in our being there then we are going to be replaced whether there is a well prepared internal person available or not. IMHO, it is incumbent upon us to develop "the necessary resources for business continuance and sustainability". We would be negligent if we don't. Best regards, Malik K. Rahman Associate Vice President/CIO University of the Pacific 3601 Pacific Ave Stockton, CA 95211 209.946.2251 mrahman@pacific.edu -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Sam Young Sent: Friday, November 18, 2011 4:15 PM To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO I'm just curious. How many of us work on a succession plan to help make it possible for someone within to take our place? This is difficult question. If we do a good job, we may be replaced sooner than we want. Or the person leaves for another job and our work is wasted. On the other hand, if we don't the institution is not gaining the necessary resources for business continuance and sustainability. What do you all do? God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator ________________________________ From: Rick Bauer Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 13:28:44 -0800 To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO I am not a consultant, but some sort of independent assessment may provide some "independence" for an in-house candidate, and suggest some paths on implementation that may need underscoring. Congrats are in order for an organization savvy enough to look for for excellence right under its nose. Of course, the consultancy/survey/360 review should include all the constituencies, and could surface some areas that previously have been heretofore underserved. Short of plastic surgery, it might be good to try to try to re-cast your initiatives by this effort. Something else a Jewish rabbi said about prophets not having honor in their own hometown also comes to mind; good luck! Rick Bauer, CompTIA
Hi Sam We started doing succession planning internally for IS some years ago when a key person had a heart attack. Now we talk about "if you call in rich who takes over for you". Every director has a second. Professional development at all levels is expected and I protect a part of my budget no matter what for training and professional development. Not all of it is technical in nature either. Annual evaluation identifies what is next in the learning curve. We also are particular about life balance and so I track who is losing vacation or close to it. And I pay attention to how I model life balance. We also started a leadership group for identified mid-level folks that meets with me and three of my other directors. It isn't big -about 10 or so but already we have had several folks emerge as our next generation. We are too small not to do succession planning. Mary Lou Sent from my iPad On Nov 18, 2011, at 6:15 PM, "Sam Young" wrote: > I’m just curious. How many of us work on a succession plan to help make it possible for someone within to take our place? > This is difficult question. If we do a good job, we may be replaced sooner than we want. Or the person leaves for another job and our work is wasted. On the other hand, if we don’t the institution is not gaining the necessary resources for business continuance and sustainability. > > What do you all do? > > God bless, > Sam Young > Chief Information Officer > Point Loma Nazarene University > > Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > > > ________________________________ > From: Rick Bauer > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 13:28:44 -0800 > To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO > > I am not a consultant, but some sort of independent assessment may provide some "independence" for an in-house candidate, and suggest some paths on implementation that may need underscoring. Congrats are in order for an organization savvy enough to look for for excellence right under its nose. Of course, the consultancy/survey/360 review should include all the constituencies, and could surface some areas that previously have been heretofore underserved. > > Short of plastic surgery, it might be good to try to try to re-cast your initiatives by this effort. > > Something else a Jewish rabbi said about prophets not having honor in their own hometown also comes to mind; good luck! > > Rick Bauer, CompTIA > >
Hi Mary Lou, Similar to you, our professional development involves leadership development. Personally, I am working on the improvement of my whole management staff. That means providing opportunities to deal with different issues and discussing critical decisions with the staff. While different people improve in different rates, my hope is that they will all improve to a much higher leadership level. We have worked very hard in the past few years and I am seeing some results. My directors and I are starting to make similar decisions on matters. Our internal communication and understanding is much better. Our trust level and accountability levels have drastically improved. If, for some reason, I am no longer the leader of this ship, it is my dream that the university will have a difficult time deciding which of my managers are best suited for the position as they are all qualified. I don't think we are there yet, but give it a little more time... As the level of leadership improves, I am finding that I have less and less to do. I have more time to think and do my own research. This year, I have used a lot more time on my three-five year ITS strategic plan than the past two years combined. We are also moving the department into a much more structured project management mode of operation. I am hoping that this will also free up my management team's time to better plan at their level. God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > From: "Hines Fritts, Mary Lou" > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > > Date: Sat, 19 Nov 2011 05:25:06 -0800 > To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO > > Hi Sam > We started doing succession planning internally for IS some years ago when a > key person had a heart attack. Now we talk about "if you call in rich who > takes over for you". Every director has a second. Professional development > at all levels is expected and I protect a part of my budget no matter what for > training and professional development. Not all of it is technical in nature > either. Annual evaluation identifies what is next in the learning curve. > > We also are particular about life balance and so I track who is losing > vacation or close to it. And I pay attention to how I model life balance. > > We also started a leadership group for identified mid-level folks that meets > with me and three of my other directors. It isn't big -about 10 or so but > already we have had several folks emerge as our next generation. > > We are too small not to do succession planning. > > Mary Lou > > Sent from my iPad > > On Nov 18, 2011, at 6:15 PM, "Sam Young" wrote: > >> I¹m just curious. How many of us work on a succession plan to help make it >> possible for someone within to take our place? >> This is difficult question. If we do a good job, we may be replaced sooner >> than we want. Or the person leaves for another job and our work is wasted. On >> the other hand, if we don¹t the institution is not gaining the necessary >> resources for business continuance and sustainability. >> >> What do you all do? >> >> God bless, >> Sam Young >> Chief Information Officer >> Point Loma Nazarene University >> >> Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator >> >> >> ________________________________ >> From: Rick Bauer >> Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv >> >> Date: Fri, 18 Nov 2011 13:28:44 -0800 >> To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" >> Subject: Re: [CIO] New CIO >> >> I am not a consultant, but some sort of independent assessment may provide >> some "independence" for an in-house candidate, and suggest some paths on >> implementation that may need underscoring. Congrats are in order for an >> organization savvy enough to look for for excellence right under its nose. Of >> course, the consultancy/survey/360 review should include all the >> constituencies, and could surface some areas that previously have been >> heretofore underserved. >> >> Short of plastic surgery, it might be good to try to try to re-cast your >> initiatives by this effort. >> >> Something else a Jewish rabbi said about prophets not having honor in their >> own hometown also comes to mind; good luck! >> >> Rick Bauer, CompTIA >> >>
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