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Greetings and Happy Holidays to all.

 

We’ve just begun the process of designing a new Health Professions Building complete with faculty/staff offices, classrooms, several computer labs etc.   Our preliminary wired Ethernet count for the building was 550+.  The construction manager asked me if I would consider going with just wireless throughout the building and not provide gigabit wired ports throughout as a cost savings measure.  My reply was that high speed wired connectivity was needed throughout the building and wireless alone would not adequately support the programming for the building.

 

Any/all thoughts on this approach would be very much appreciated and has anyone considered building a Health Sciences or any new classroom building with wireless only?

 

Regards,

 

Rick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rick Kubb

Director of Technology Services
Maryville University
314-529-9606

Gander Hall, Room 215

rkubb@maryville.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We will be opening a new human health building next spring. We will have wired and wireless networking.  There are network intensive applications planned, such as video, digital microscopy and simulations. We don't think wireless alone would handle lab, research and office needs. If you'd like our network requirements we would be happy to share.

Theresa

On Friday, December 9, 2011, Kubb, Richard <rkubb@maryville.edu> wrote:
> Greetings and Happy Holidays to all.
>
>  
>
> We’ve just begun the process of designing a new Health Professions Building complete with faculty/staff offices, classrooms, several computer labs etc.   Our preliminary wired Ethernet count for the building was 550+.  The construction manager asked me if I would consider going with just wireless throughout the building and not provide gigabit wired ports throughout as a cost savings measure.  My reply was that high speed wired connectivity was needed throughout the building and wireless alone would not adequately support the programming for the building.
>
>  
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> Any/all thoughts on this approach would be very much appreciated and has anyone considered building a Health Sciences or any new classroom building with wireless only?
>
>  
>
> Regards,
>
>  
>
> Rick.
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
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>  
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> Rick Kubb
>
> Director of Technology Services
> Maryville University
> 314-529-9606
>
> Gander Hall, Room 215
>
> rkubb@maryville.edu
>
>  
>
> ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We have just completed a new business school.  We increased the density of wireless APs, recognizing that it is moving to a more important mode of network access. We did not move away from wired connections in office, labs,  or podiums. We did reduce the number of wired ports in public spaces and conference rooms.

 

Jerry

 

 

Jerome F. Waldron, CIO

Salisbury University

Salisbury, MD  21801

410-546-6933

freshmantech.blogspot.com

 

"The people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world
are the ones who do."

-- Apple's "Think Different" Commercial, 1997

 

The one comment I would make is it likely not going to produce the cost saving the project manager expects. Here are some reasons not to go along with this. 1. You will likely need a fairly robust wired infrastructure to support the wireless AP's. This still requires a building router and gigabit switches on each floor to support the wireless AP's. 2. Increasingly wired connections are used by facilities for energy and facilities managerment. Most of those don't have wireless connections. 3. If you have computer labs or staff machines that you remotely image having wired ports is a real benefit. In general, your savings may be that you could reduce the number of switches you buy on each floor; however that is unlikely to generate tremendous savings Good luck,
Message from mahoneycutt@gmail.com

Going totally wireless is always "three to five years away".
 
I'm still in the wired camp due to speed and equipment issues.
 
While many desktop PCs and Macs have wireless built in,
what about the old computers and printers that will most likely
be in the new building?  Having to buy, install and support
wireless adapters on equipment that wasn't designed for
wireless can be frustrating.  Likewise, many manufacturers
of non-computer equipment - scientific machines, door locks,
physical fitness equipment - are barely supporting wired connections.
 
Given you'd have to install at least a partial wired network - cables,
wire closets - to implement a wireless network, I feel (for at least
the next 3 to 5 years ;-), there is a strong argument for installing
both infrastructures.
 
Mike
828-280-3676
 
==============
 
  
 



Hi Rick,

 

            We’ve had the same issue come up numerous times with various types of facilities, and our team agrees with your position. If someone insists that wireless is the only choice, then we require that we employ a very high-density (maximum capacity) and high-bandwidth equipment. We also provide the caveat the your mileage may vary and more costs will likely be incurred shortly after the facility is opened since it is so difficult to predict utilization patterns in a given facility. With regard to a health sciences facility, we would not employ a wireless-only network. We all know how scientists: medical staff/students/faculty, engineers, etc. can consume massive amounts of bandwidth for prolonged periods of time.

 

Mickey

*******************************************************************************

Michael R. Belote

Chief Technology Officer

Mercer University

1400 Coleman Avenue

Macon, GA 31207

O: 478-301-2850

M: 478-719-2955

http://IT.Mercer.edu

 

Richard,

 

We will be breaking ground on a new science building this year.  After working closely with the architects and faculty groups our design includes both wired and wireless capability as the wireless alone will not suffice for the video and collaborative work planned by the faculty.

 

Please contact me off-list if you’d like to know more about our thought process and planned design.

 

Gloria

 

=========================

Gloria M. Barlow

Chief Information Officer

Wilkes University

Phone   570 408 4440

 

Wilkes ITS will never ask for passwords or personal information in email.

                                               THINK BEFORE YOU CLICK!!

 

We have a number of construction projects underway and are going with high density wireless coverage as well as a significant number of wired ports.  Although many of our end users are telling us the wireless network is their network of preference, the need for wired connections doesn't really seam to be diminishing.  We may be connecting different kind devices to the wired network than we had previously.  The addition of new and different wired devices is outweighing the number of devices that have migrated to a primarily wireless connection.

Joe
______________________________________
Joseph Moreau
Chief Technology Officer
State University of New York at Oswego
509 Culkin Hall
7060 State Route 104
Oswego, NY  13126
joseph.moreau@oswego.edu
315-312-5500 office
315-806-2166 mobile
315-312-5799 fax
______________________________________


Hello, Rick:

 

I am in the process of designing such a building at this time. I agree with many of the other posters. It is simply impossible to do without wired connections at this time, given the bandwidth requirements of many of the video-based and image-driven applications within a health sciences institution. We have chosen to go with high density wireless for all the student areas and wireless and wired access for all faculty areas. In classrooms and other teaching spaces, the primarily teaching computer will be wired and the student access will be wireless.

 

Even so, in order to ensure that the security and VLAN architecture is done correctly, we are looking at a large number of ports. From our evaluation, the wireless capability is just not quite there yet.

 

Sincerely,

 

Terence Ma, PhD

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Information Services

Professor of Anatomy

California Northstate University College of Medicine

9700 West Taron Drive

Elk Grove, CA 95757

Ph: 916-686-7301

Fx: 916-686-7310

Terence.Ma@cnucom.org

 

 

 

Message from russ.leathe@gordon.edu

We just finished three floors of a new Science Center (Named after Ken Olsen, 80,000 square feet of Science!), and we installed both.

 

My reasoning include the following…

 

1.)    Students use wireless

2.)    Scientific equipment still ship “wired only”

3.)    Most Scientific Equipment require a static IP, and need to be accessed by the manufactures tech-support

4.)    Full-duplex vs. half-duplex

5.)    Multimedia, Video Conferencing, Digital Signage, VOIP, IPTV – definitely wired

6.)    Faculty are broadcasting and performing Lecture Capture

 

We need the speeds for wired and the students need the convenience of wireless.

 

I hope this is helpful,

 

Russ

Director Of Networking, Computer Services, and Security

Gordon College

russ@gordon.edu

 

 

 

A few years ago the institution I was at built a new science building. The building housed Biology, Math and Computer Science. Not knowing exactly which and how equipments were to be used, we decided to provide both wired and wireless through out the whole building. Each office had four Ethernet outlets per wall. Each classroom included at least two wireless AP and wired connections and power on the floor. The labs contained four Ethernet outlet and four power outlets per workstation plus multiple wireless AP God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator ________________________________
Thank you - have a great weekend! Marianne
I had the same question asked here for two new buildings this past year. I of course said no but I have heard of other schools getting similar questions form the architects and construction managers. Makes you wonder what magazines they are reading?

Cheers

Bradley Bowness
Chief Information Officer
Information Technology Services
College of New Caledonia
3330 - 22nd Avenue
Prince George, B.C., Canada V2N 1P8
Phone: 250 562 2131, ext 5264
Cell: 250 552 4213
Fax: 250 561 5824
DISCLAIMER: This e-mail message is intended only for the named recipient(s) above and may contain information that is privileged, confidential and/or exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you have received this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), please immediately notify the sender and delete this e-mail message

On 2011-12-12, at 10:23 AM, "Ian McLeod" <McLeodI@CAMOSUN.BC.CA> wrote:

Wireless by definition will never be as fast or reliable as the latest wired technology. I would NEVER substitute wireless for wired connections where there are still requirements for fixed port locations.

 

Ian McLeod, CCP, I.S.P., ITCP

Director, IT Services

Camosun College

3100 Foul Bay Road

Victoria, BC   V8P 5J2

Tel: 250-370-3293

Fax: 20-470-3966

Email: mcleodi@camosun.bc.ca        

 

<image001.jpg>

 

Hi Rick,

 

  Yes, wired connections are essential because of the reasons already mentioned.  I suggest that you choose the most modern network spec available. We learned some lessons a few years ago about cable installation that I would be happy to share with you and our colleagues. It’s funny to me how that one of the most valuable utilities (network infrastructure) in the project is often an afterthought in the design process and sometimes not even a part of the final architectural plans. Anyway…

 

Here is some construction advice that may be helpful:

 

1.       Require that an employee (preferably not a temp contractor) from the construction management company be BISCI certified, on-site, available, and involved with planning and installing your network. Verify this person’s name and certification number.

 

2.       Make sure the person in #1 coordinates the network installation with the other phases of the project (e.g. painters, sheet rock installers, ceiling installers, and electricians).

 

3.       Require the entire installation be warranted by the cabling manufacturer. This is most important because this clause usually:

A.      Insures the installers are trained and certified from the manufacturer to install the network.

B.      Insures that all components match correctly (e.g. cable, jack, & patch panel).

C.      Requires an onsite inspection from the manufacturer (who will not warranty an improperly installed network).

D.      Insures the installation is done properly (e.g. grounding, cable supports, # of bends, & more)

 

4.       Require network test results of all drops and runs. Verify a few of them independently to make sure there are no “false-positives” in the test results.

 

5.       Require a “turn-key” or “end-to-end” installation with no ambiguity as to whose responsibility it is to terminate, test, and remediate problems.

 

6.       Require plenum rated cables (even if it’s not installed in the plenum area). Meaning if the cable burns, it won’t give off toxic fumes during a fire. It’s more expensive, but it’s worth it.

 

7.       DO NOT LET ANYONE PAINT THE CABLE(S). Here is my “Five reasons not to paint the cable speech”:
                A. Over time, the chemicals in the paint will degrade the physical jacket of the cable.
                B. As the jacket degrades, performance will degrade also (especially on high speed networks).
                C. Paint modifies the plenum rating of the cable .
                D. Paint voids the manufactures warranty of the entire cable run, end-to-end.
                E.  Paint changes the color of the cable (e.g. data vs. voice).

 

8.       Allow for the installation of 10-15% more drops to be added to the design plans during the project.

 

9.       Make sure the architect is planning appropriate data closet locations and cable pathways (that are not attached to other utilities).

 

10.   Don’t forget the patch cables in the installation.

 

11.   Do not allow plastic wire ties on cabling (installer should know this but just in case…). Plastic wire ties wrapped tight around cable bundles will actually degrade the performance of the cable. We had a 70% initial failure rate on a new gigabit (cat 6) installation because of this.

 

12.   Require interested vendors to attend a pre-proposal site meeting before bidding on the project. You may choose not to allow substitute  contractors to represent companies that are not interested enough to send their own employees on-site.

 

 

  If the construction manager is not willing to work with you on the above items, you may consider handling this part of the project directly. This has actually  been the most successful approach for us. We have a network RFP that I would be happy to share with you if you would like a template to use that should cover most of the items above.

 

Best Wishes,

 

Dan

 

Dan Moore, MBA
Executive Director of Information Technology/CIO
Office: 580.745.2006
Fax: 580.745.2007
Email: 
dmoore@se.edu

Southeastern Oklahoma State University
1405 North Fourth Avenue PMB 4230
Durant, Oklahoma 74701-0609
http://www.se.edu

POISE/PX Users Group
Board Member, 2009-2012
http://www.puginc.org

 

 

 

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