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Good article in NY Times

 

More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices. NY Times, September 23, 2011.

Instead of seeing this as a threat, how might we embrace? iPads for all my friends! A laptop in every pot. Have it your way (but you make the burger)...

 

Seriously, the notion of providing stipends has a certain amount of appeal. Not for all, but some. My how our world is changing.



*******

Excerpts

"Throughout the information age, the corporate I.T. department has stood at the chokepoint of office technology with a firm hand on what equipment and software employees use in the workplace.
...

"But I.T. departments are gradually warming to the idea simply because their bosses left them little choice. The I.T. staff may grieve for their lost power, but they do it.

“They’re over the denial and anger stage, and now they are in the acceptance and ‘How can we help?’ stage,” said Mr. Schadler, who co-wrote the book “Empowered,” which addresses consumer technology in the workplace. “What broke the camel’s back was the iPad, because executives brought it into the company and said ‘Hey, you’ve got to support this.’ ”

“Bring your own device” is not for every company. Because of security concerns and data retention laws, some firms like Wells Fargo do not let employees connect to corporate networks with their personal electronics. Protecting the bank’s customers is more important than any benefit from letting employees use their personal devices for business, said Jim Spicer, chief information officer of corporate technology and data for the company."

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More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices

 

 

 

**********************

Dwight Fischer, Asst. VP/CIO

Information Technology Services

Dalhousie University

 

902-494-2215 

dwight.fischer@dal.ca

**********************

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

My question is – What are the difference in reliability between consumer grade machines and enterprise grade machines? The vendors say there is definitely a difference but has anyone really done a study? God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator ________________________________ From: Dwight Fischer Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 05:33:53 -0700 To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" Subject: [CIO] NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices Good article in NY Times More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices . NY Times, September 23, 2011. Instead of seeing this as a threat, how might we embrace? iPads for all my friends! A laptop in every pot. Have it your way (but you make the burger)... Seriously, the notion of providing stipends has a certain amount of appeal. Not for all, but some. My how our world is changing. ******* Excerpts "Throughout the information age, the corporate I.T. department has stood at the chokepoint of office technology with a firm hand on what equipment and software employees use in the workplace. ... "But I.T. departments are gradually warming to the idea simply because their bosses left them little choice. The I.T. staff may grieve for their lost power, but they do it. “They’re over the denial and anger stage, and now they are in the acceptance and ‘How can we help?’ stage,” said Mr. Schadler, who co-wrote the book “Empowered,” which addresses consumer technology in the workplace. “What broke the camel’s back was the iPad, because executives brought it into the company and said ‘Hey, you’ve got to support this.’ ” “Bring your own device” is not for every company. Because of security concerns and data retention laws, some firms like Wells Fargo do not let employees connect to corporate networks with their personal electronics. Protecting the bank’s customers is more important than any benefit from letting employees use their personal devices for business, said Jim Spicer, chief information officer of corporate technology and data for the company." Subscription More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices ********************** Dwight Fischer, Asst. VP/CIO Information Technology Services Dalhousie University 902-494-2215 dwight.fischer@dal.ca ********************** ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Sam:

There is definitely a difference between consumer and business grade. In the many years that we gave out laptops to our students we would typically be able to evaluate hardware maintenance issues for a certain year. We did have a few years where we went with more of the consumer line of a PC brand and we paid the price in year 2 and 3. The real difference other then slightly higher quality frame and structure is that the business line only uses parts that have actually been tested. The consumer boxes may have the exact same parts but they have not been tested at batch/lot level. This is very evident with memory and processors. Doesn't mean they don't still have issues but it does allow them to isolate the problems. This does help us to justify Apple since their products have been built to business or better specs.

Greg Smith
Chief Information Officer
George Fox University
------------------------------
Be Known at Oregon's Nationally Recognized Christian University


Greg, I appreciate your response. I certainly agree with your observations related to business versus consumer-grade hardware. It is interesting that you feel that Apple has built their machines to business specs. We would certainly have agreed with you 4 years ago about those specifications. In the last 2-3 years, my techs are reporting a significant drop in the quality of the Apple machines that we have been receiving. Specifically, they report a big increase in hard drive and motherboard failures in the first 3 years of ownership. Nearly a third of our campus machines are Apple and we are an Apple certified repair shop. Our techs have reported that the number of repairs is starting to become a production issue in our relatively small shop. We are still very "pro-mac" here. In fact, I am typing to the list on a 15 inch Mac Pro. Just wish I could see the quality go back to what it was. Gary Roberts Director of Information Technology Services Alfred University From: Greg Smith > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2011 08:40:36 -0700 To: > Subject: Re: [CIO] NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own Devices Sam: There is definitely a difference between consumer and business grade. In the many years that we gave out laptops to our students we would typically be able to evaluate hardware maintenance issues for a certain year. We did have a few years where we went with more of the consumer line of a PC brand and we paid the price in year 2 and 3. The real difference other then slightly higher quality frame and structure is that the business line only uses parts that have actually been tested. The consumer boxes may have the exact same parts but they have not been tested at batch/lot level. This is very evident with memory and processors. Doesn't mean they don't still have issues but it does allow them to isolate the problems. This does help us to justify Apple since their products have been built to business or better specs. Greg Smith Chief Information Officer George Fox University ------------------------------ Be Known at Oregon's Nationally Recognized Christian University
Message from mahoneycutt@gmail.com

I'm retired from High Ed but in 28 years of university work and fixing many PCs
outside of work, I've never seen any differences in quality (they all break) or
speed.  It has been my understanding that the enterprise-level machines have
fewer hardware options so they are easier for a large organization to maintain.
 
My work has been almost exclusively with Dell PCs.
 
Mike Honeycutt
 
 
==============
 
  
 



I would suggest that higher education IT organizations have a considerable level of experience with "bring your own device" (BYOD). For example, consider the following questions: 1. Do your students (resident or commuter) bring their personal desktop or laptop to campus? How many years has that practice been in place? 2. Do adjunct faculty bring their personal laptops to campus for instruction, advising, or research? How many years has that practice been in place? If you answered yes to one or both of these questions, you are supporting BYOD in some fashion. I also find the stipend approach attractive and have been contemplating a pilot effort on our campus. At this point most of my discussion has been with our CFO. Has anyone tried this on a small scale, departmental level or otherwise? Built it into compensation, especially for adjuncts? And one more quote from the article: “You shouldn’t reject things that make employees more productive, and if those things happen to be consumer technologies, so be it,” said Ted Schadler, an analyst with Forrester Research. Thanks, Jeff Jeffrey C. Cepull | Vice President for Information Resources and CIO | Philadelphia University | 215-951-2516 | 215-951-6852 - FAX Please consider the environment before printing this email
I have always allowed faculty and staff to pick their platforms to the greatest extent possible. When I left higher ed recently, we were buying more and more Apple laptops for faculty. The reasons for switching to personally owned computers are many, and some are not advantageous to the employee. 1) Computers are "listed property" per IRS rules. Cell phones were also "listed property" until a few weeks ago. If one uses the computer for personal business, that use is a taxable "event" and must be logged by the user of the computer and reported to the employer. A real pain as you can imagine. Businesses don't want any part of that. The IRS was dissuaded from pursing taxes on cell phones, but laptops and desktops could be the next target. By the way, other items that are considered listed property are corporate jets and other large perqs provided by the employer. 2) The stipends are usually not generous. Enough to buy a low end laptop in most cases. Additionally, the stipend is taxable to the employee, reducing the value accordingly. And while we are talking about taxes, the employee also ends up paying the sales tax. 3) At least some stipend plans require the employee to get his/her support from the vendor. Anyone who's spent hours on hold with a PC vendor knows how efficient this would be. 4) IT support for a wide variety of equipment would be a nightmare. Even if the components in consumer grade products are durable and reliable, they change frequently resulting in driver differences and the like. It's no smart. 5) Can you enforce policy and procedure on a computer that is not owned by the company? I wouldn't do it although YMMV. Bob Bob "It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation" Melville
Sam In light of delivery of most services via a browser or app there is little need for the differentiation between personal use & enterprise. "manage the access not the assets" Stephen diFilipo Vice President & Chief Information Officer Cecil College One Seahawk Drive North East, MD 21901 410-287-1021
Indeed, the lines between our university (work) and personal/private digital personas are increasingly blurry. I personally stopped making the distinction long go, ...on everything :: the laptops, Windows tablet, iPad, smartphones, Google+, Facebook, Twitter, email, text messaging, telephone, and the myriad of technology I and many of us use these days make no difference how and when we use them. And I do purchase consumer grade personal computers to get better value for our money, but also, because, in my experience, they work very well, certainly for the Teaching & Learning with Technology and multimedia applications we use them for. I strongly believe that the personalization of the college student's comfortable digital lifestyle will increasingly play a very important role in how our institutions adjust to embrace this reality. A handful of thoughts and opportunities that come to mind include a) managing access, not assets, as Stephen suggests, but also: b) better campus education on backing-up information c) providing modern and ultraeasy campus back-up services to individuals d) redesigning class materials and reassessing Educational Technology for Ubiquitous Learning and the mobile learner and instructor e) exploring some type of BestBuy-like Geek Squad service to university faculty, students and staff to help them diagnose and correct mobile computing, smartphone and tablet hardware and/or configuration problems Facilitating a self-service, crowd-sourced social digital repair activity could scale very nicely f) more focus on consumer electronics and better communication and advice for our University's user community on trends and peer-to-peer recommendations. Again, social networking and community-building technology could help us facilitate a scalable self-service activity where our students, faculty and staff can help themselves, along with some expert technical oversight from our units. I like seeing everyone get the technology they want, as long as they have access to unbiased university advise on what to stay away from. Greetings from Chicago // still without a hotel room for Educause. Ed Garay Assistant Director for Academic Computing Director, UIC Instructional Technology Lab University of Illinois at Chicago ITL Blog: www.accc.uic.edu/itl/blog www.accc.uic.edu/itl www.twitter.com/garay ** Ubiquitous Learning :: teaching and learning (while on the go) anytime, anywhere... [ Sent from iPad ]
Hi Stephen, Our campus is moving towards a device agnostic environment. I personally led to way by pushing my department to rethink what service means. We are also moving to a cloud based computing environment where applications will reside on the cloud. On the other hand, we still have tech support. Faculty and staff still expect their computers "fixed" and they expect them to work in the university environment. That means the computer must work with all the presentation devices, the lecture capture SW, video conference SW, they want to print, and they must work within our network. Additionally, they want the university provided SW. They, off course, still expect ITS to pay for their computers. As a result, we do have cost and support issues to think about. Currently, we have a number of windows images. When a new computer comes into our shop, we install the appropriate image onto the computer. The installation process is quick and painless. I'm sure most of you are using similar technologies. Since the image has been tested, we can guarantee that it will work in our environment. If people have different devices, imaging will not work. The cost of installing and ensuring that the device/SW will work is going increase. It would be nice to tell the faculty: "Sorry, we cannot support your computer. You will have to go back to where you purchase it to receive support." I personally do not think that is realistic at this time. If a faculty is going to make a presentation and the computer is having problems, it is ITS's obligation to help. If we know the device, we are better able to resolve the issues. The question is "Where is the line?" It used to be very clear, but it is obviously a lot less clear. God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > From: Steve diFilipo > Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 05:49:51 -0700 > To: Sam Young > Cc: "cio@listserv.educause.edu" > Subject: RE: NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own > Devices > > Sam > > In light of delivery of most services via a browser or app there is little > need for the differentiation between personal use & enterprise. > > "manage the access not the assets" > > > Stephen diFilipo > Vice President & Chief Information Officer > Cecil College > One Seahawk Drive > North East, MD 21901 > 410-287-1021 > > >
Sam you have finally mentioned the elephant in my own personal room. IT is made up of folks who became control freaks only because they have to have a way to discharge the responsibility of making things work. I am uncomfortable moving in the direction you seem to be going without knowing how I will deliver on that responsibility. We can talk of the desirability or inevitability of this trend but how do we function in that open environment? Not just how do we redefine the limits of our service but how do we do it in a way that still allows the university to function? If you have gone down this road, what tactics have you used to make the problem tractable? p The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv on Monday, September 26, 2011 at 11:12 AM -0400 wrote: >Hi Stephen, > >Our campus is moving towards a device agnostic environment. I personally >led >to way by pushing my department to rethink what service means. We are also >moving to a cloud based computing environment where applications will >reside >on the cloud. > >On the other hand, we still have tech support. Faculty and staff still >expect their computers "fixed" and they expect them to work in the >university environment. That means the computer must work with all the >presentation devices, the lecture capture SW, video conference SW, they >want >to print, and they must work within our network. Additionally, they want >the >university provided SW. They, off course, still expect ITS to pay for >their >computers. As a result, we do have cost and support issues to think about. > >Currently, we have a number of windows images. When a new computer comes >into our shop, we install the appropriate image onto the computer. The >installation process is quick and painless. I'm sure most of you are using >similar technologies. Since the image has been tested, we can guarantee >that >it will work in our environment. If people have different devices, imaging >will not work. The cost of installing and ensuring that the device/SW will >work is going increase. > >It would be nice to tell the faculty: "Sorry, we cannot support your >computer. You will have to go back to where you purchase it to receive >support." I personally do not think that is realistic at this time. If a >faculty is going to make a presentation and the computer is having >problems, >it is ITS's obligation to help. If we know the device, we are better able >to >resolve the issues. > >The question is "Where is the line?" It used to be very clear, but it is >obviously a lot less clear. > >God bless, >Sam Young >Chief Information Officer >Point Loma Nazarene University > >Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > > >> From: Steve diFilipo >> Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 05:49:51 -0700 >> To: Sam Young >> Cc: "cio@listserv.educause.edu" >> Subject: RE: NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own >> Devices >> >> Sam >> >> In light of delivery of most services via a browser or app there is >little >> need for the differentiation between personal use & enterprise. >> >> "manage the access not the assets" >> >> >> Stephen diFilipo >> Vice President & Chief Information Officer >> Cecil College >> One Seahawk Drive >> North East, MD 21901 >> 410-287-1021 >> >> >>
Message from kyle.johnson@sunyit.edu

Hi Peter, Here are some of the things we are doing to move forward to an agnostic computing environment. I'm still not sure we will get there but we will come a lot closer. 1. We are moving towards a cloud based virtual desktop and virtual application environment. With this environment, any smart device would be able to use any application we place in the cloud. 2. We are rolling out student printing very shortly. This will allow students to print to any print-accounting enabled device on campus. We are also adding printers in the residence halls and other strategic locations. 3. We have drastically increased our wifi coverage around campus to make sure we can handle the wireless load. 4. We should be completing our Single Sign-On helpfully in the next few months. 5. Looking at installing new help desk/remote control/device management software. Moving forward we will be looking for: 1. Collaborative environment(s) much like Google Apps, etc. 2. Increase network storage space for students, faculty and staff. 3. Explore learning collaborative spaces on campus. (I wanted to introduce the concept of an out door library, since San Diego introduced the out door malls. But I met some resistance from some folks.) Etc. This is a multi-year transition. God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator > From: Peter Allmaker > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > > Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 08:36:33 -0700 > To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [CIO] NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own > Devices > > Sam you have finally mentioned the elephant in my own personal room. IT > is made up of folks who became control freaks only because they have to > have a way to discharge the responsibility of making things work. I am > uncomfortable moving in the direction you seem to be going without knowing > how I will deliver on that responsibility. We can talk of the > desirability or inevitability of this trend but how do we function in that > open environment? Not just how do we redefine the limits of our service > but how do we do it in a way that still allows the university to function? > > > If you have gone down this road, what tactics have you used to make the > problem tractable? > > p > > > The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv > on Monday, September 26, 2011 at 11:12 AM > -0400 wrote: >> Hi Stephen, >> >> Our campus is moving towards a device agnostic environment. I personally >> led >> to way by pushing my department to rethink what service means. We are also >> moving to a cloud based computing environment where applications will >> reside >> on the cloud. >> >> On the other hand, we still have tech support. Faculty and staff still >> expect their computers "fixed" and they expect them to work in the >> university environment. That means the computer must work with all the >> presentation devices, the lecture capture SW, video conference SW, they >> want >> to print, and they must work within our network. Additionally, they want >> the >> university provided SW. They, off course, still expect ITS to pay for >> their >> computers. As a result, we do have cost and support issues to think about. >> >> Currently, we have a number of windows images. When a new computer comes >> into our shop, we install the appropriate image onto the computer. The >> installation process is quick and painless. I'm sure most of you are using >> similar technologies. Since the image has been tested, we can guarantee >> that >> it will work in our environment. If people have different devices, imaging >> will not work. The cost of installing and ensuring that the device/SW will >> work is going increase. >> >> It would be nice to tell the faculty: "Sorry, we cannot support your >> computer. You will have to go back to where you purchase it to receive >> support." I personally do not think that is realistic at this time. If a >> faculty is going to make a presentation and the computer is having >> problems, >> it is ITS's obligation to help. If we know the device, we are better able >> to >> resolve the issues. >> >> The question is "Where is the line?" It used to be very clear, but it is >> obviously a lot less clear. >> >> God bless, >> Sam Young >> Chief Information Officer >> Point Loma Nazarene University >> >> Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator >> >> >>> From: Steve diFilipo >>> Date: Mon, 26 Sep 2011 05:49:51 -0700 >>> To: Sam Young >>> Cc: "cio@listserv.educause.edu" >>> Subject: RE: NYTimes Article: More Offices Let Workers Choose Their Own >>> Devices >>> >>> Sam >>> >>> In light of delivery of most services via a browser or app there is >> little >>> need for the differentiation between personal use & enterprise. >>> >>> "manage the access not the assets" >>> >>> >>> Stephen diFilipo >>> Vice President & Chief Information Officer >>> Cecil College >>> One Seahawk Drive >>> North East, MD 21901 >>> 410-287-1021 >>> >>> >>>
I haven't experienced a difference in quality necessarily, however there are a number of considerations of business class systems that greatly reduce the overall support TCO and ability to efficiently support the campus environment, some of which have been mentioned in the thread. Imaging has made us orders of magnitude more efficient, both for initial set-up and repair. We can't provide that on non-contract systems, or on consumer models. Business class systems have predictable model lives and standardized parts. We are a warranty repair facility and depend on this consistency to provide the purchased next business day turnaround. This also enables the imaging mentioned above and before. Many hardware repairs by non-certified technicians void the warranty, thus greatly increasing liability considerations of touching personal or out-of-contract systems, unless you can certify your personnel on multiple platforms. Inevitably, once you touch it, they feel you own any problems that later occur with that system, related or not, signed release form notwithstanding. We have state and Board of Regent policy prohibitions from touching personally-owned systems (use of government funds on personally-owned property and non-competition with local vendor considerations). We will attempt to help with connection, set-up, configuration issues, etc., but we can't physically fix faculty or staff personally-owned systems. Therefore, as I've also seen on the list, we try to help as much as possible, but we standardize to save money and recognize that we simply aren't funded or resourced to be all things to everyone, particularly until fads prove their worthiness. Ricky Roberts Director of Technical Support Northern Arizona University (928) 523-6950
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