Main Nav

We moved our students to gmail more than a year ago while our faculty and staff are still on MS Exchange 2003.  The student move went very well and students are very happy with gmail.  We are debating whether to move employees over to Office365/live@edu. Most faculty and staff would like to keep the same Exchange environment (functions, look and feel) that they are currently using rather than using gmail, but IT would like to outsource the email system to the cloud.  Has anyone already moved to this kind of split cloud environment or are you planning to move to a split environment?

My questions are:

1.       What were your pro’s and con’s for having two separate e-mail environments?

2.       Have you found any issues for users with this split environment (employees and students)?

3.       Have there been any mail routing issues (mail delays, etc.)?

4.       Are you comfortable with your decision or in hindsight would you have done something different?

Thanks,

Chris

 

  

Christopher D. Fulkerson
Assistant Vice President for Technology/CIO
 
Elon University                Phone: 336-278-5055
100 Campus Drive           Fax:     336-278-2802 
2550 Campus Box           Email:  fulkers@elon.edu
Elon, NC 27244-2010        Web:    www.elon.edu/technology

Note:  Elon Campus Technologies will never ask for your password or other personal information via email.
Messages requesting such information are fraudulent and should be deleted.

 

Think Green. Do you really need to print this email? 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

AttachmentSize
image001.gif1.59 KB

Comments

From a legal and policy perspective, there are a number of advantages, depending, of course, on what your institution's contract promises with respect to the usual regulatory suspects: FERPA, GLBA and HIPAA information, not to mention a host of other issues such as export control and specific privacy and security requirements in grants.  

Cornell, for example, has a split environment.  Here is a drill down example of the challenge:  University Counsel prohibits the transmission or storage of HIPAA data without a Business Associates Agreement.  I do not know for a fact either way whether our mail system is used for the transmission or storage of this kind of data, but I do know that it is prohibited on external vendor and/or cloud resources unless and until that agreement is signed.  And BTW, that prohibition extends to physical space just as in cyberspace.  Cornell requires the company that comes to shred paper documents that contain HIPAA data also to sign a BAA.

One could go down the list with federal regulation and other related issues (e.g. who pays for a data breach notification?) ... I am not aware of any institution that has a contract with any mail vendor that actually covers all of these issues.  (Let me know if you do?)

The question then moves from contractual assurances to risk management.  Thus far, it has been easier to outsource student mail, where these issues do not arise, and keep administrative and faculty mail inside.

Best, Tracy



On Dec 7, 2011, at 4:42 PM, Kyle Johnson wrote:

Message from dthibeau@post03.curry.edu

Chris,

 

We use G-Mail (out-sourced) for students and Exchange (in-house) for staff and faculty.

1.       What were your pro’s and con’s for having two separate e-mail environments?

PROs – None that I can think of other than each has what they want.  We have never had a single e-mail environment, so it wasn’t a matter of migrating from one combined system to two separate ones.

CONs – Obviously sharing resources, such as collaboration tools, documents, calendars, etc., is inconvenient at the very least.  Account/User management is less convenient because you have two systems, and there will be cases where people require (or claim to need) accounts in both systems.  That can create challenges for automated systems.  We found ways to manage it, but it sure wasn’t as convenient as we would have liked. 

2.       Have you found any issues for users with this split environment (employees and students)?

No not really.  Since we’ve always had them separate, we’re used to it.  Unfortunately the students don’t use many of the features/tools and if they did I think there might be more issues.  Users with an account on both systems have to pick one to get their mail.  They can have the other forwarded, so they have to decide.  Of course if you chose to grant them different e-mail addresses on each system that would not be an issue.

3.       Have there been any mail routing issues (mail delays, etc.)?

No, we have not experienced any delays whatsoever.  It has been quite fast.  We do have some minor delays when people send to massive lists of internal users using Constant Contact since it floods our anti-spam filter, but that’s unrelated to the separation of resources.  In fact, we still route all the student e-mail through our college and then off to G-Mail, which is something that we might address later on to improve performance.  But since we don’t have a performance problem, we haven’t bothered.

4.       Are you comfortable with your decision or in hindsight would you have done something different?

Yes, one of the best decisions we’ve made was moving the student e-mail off campus.  Now, once I get the faculty and staff to migrate I won’t have to worry about managing e-mail and having staff to supported clustered servers, storage, and all the other issues you have when you try to manage your e-mail in-house.  If it weren’t such a political hot potato I’d have moved faculty and staff to G-mail long ago.  Of course, then we’d have the advantage of one system as well J.

Dennis

 

Chris,

We at Messiah College transitioned from Groupwise (Novell) to Live@edu (web based) and Outlook (on faculty, staff, and admin computers) this past summer.  Everything email for us is in the cloud now.  We would be glad to discuss the issues we had.  There was initial concerns during the transition and training period, but things are quite stable now.

Bill

Hi Chris,

 

According to the data from the 2011 Core Data Survey, 162 out of 631 participating institutions have in-house staff/faculty email, but outsourced student email.  Only 1 school indicated that they use live.edu for staff/faculty email.

 

Institutions that have completed this year’s survey would be able to identify which institutions had split environments. 

 

This information and more is available at - http://www.educause.edu/coredata

 

Let me know if you’d like any other information.

 

-Leah

 

Leah Lang

Senior IT Metrics and Benchmarking Analyst

Educause

llang@educause.edu

 

 

I'm really interested in this thread also.   We currently provide both student and faculty/staff email inhouse.   We're likely going to go to MS Office 365 (whatever it's called today) in the foreseeable future, as that looks like the direction all of Higher Ed in WA State is going.  The question for me is "Do we consider Gmail for students, or do we move them to MS also"?   Obviously there are many schools that use Exchange inhouse, and have their students on Gmail.  I'm curious as Chris is .... how many of you have BOTH in the cloud ... but in different clouds?  
 
 
THANKS
Carmen
 


>>> Leah Lang <llang@EDUCAUSE.EDU> 12/7/2011 3:16 PM >>>

Hi Chris,

 

According to the data from the 2011 Core Data Survey, 162 out of 631 participating institutions have in-house staff/faculty email, but outsourced student email.  Only 1 school indicated that they use live.edu for staff/faculty email.

 

Institutions that have completed this year's survey would be able to identify which institutions had split environments. 

 

This information and more is available at - http://www.educause.edu/coredata

 

Let me know if you'd like any other information.

 

-Leah

 

Leah Lang

Senior IT Metrics and Benchmarking Analyst

Educause

llang@educause.edu

 

 


Data from the 2011 Campus Computing Survey reveal that while campuses across all sectors are moving to hosted email for their students, institutions have been far less willing to migrate faculty, administrators, and staff to third-party, cloud-based email services.  

As shown in the table below (and attached), more than two-thirds of universities, public four-year colleges, and community colleges are currently converting to or are now using hosted/outsourced email for students.  In contrast, less than a fourth have moved to hosted email services for faculty, staff, and administrators.


The movement towards hosted email for students has been surprisingly fast, up from 42.2 percent of the institutions participating in the 2008 Campus Computing Survey to 67.5 percent in 2011.  In contrast, the migration to hosted email for campus personnel has lagged well behind the student migration: 14.8 percent in 2088, rising to 22.8 percent in fall 2011.

As noted in the 2011 Campus Computing Report, there are many reasons to migrate to outsourced student email services.  Clearly budget issues are a catalyst: eliminating student email allows institutions to redeploy money and other IT resources; the financial savings can run from small to significant.  Moreover, unlike their counterparts of just a decade ago, email is no longer a rite of passage experience for today's college freshmen:  students (of all ages) now "arrive" on campus with multiple email addresses linked to well-established email identities and preferences.    Concurrently, there are also compelling reasons why campuses are not moving campus personnel to outsourced email, primarily concerns about confidentiality and eDiscovery.

The migration to outsourced apps (Google Docs; Microsoft 360) has been much slower than the migration to outsourced email.  Just 15 percent of the institutions participating in the 2011 Campus Computing Survey report that they are "converting to/now using" either Google Apps or Microsoft Office Live; the numbers range from 13 percent in community colleges to 28 percent in public research universities.
 

Casey Green
Campus Computing

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 Kenneth C. Green   818.990.2212
 The Campus Computing Project®
 www.campuscomputing.net
 cgreen@campuscomputing.net
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

----------------------------------------------------------
IMPORTANT WARNING:  This email (and any attachments) is only intended for the use of the person or entity to which it is addressed, and may contain information that is privileged and confidential.  You, the recipient, are obligated to maintain it in a safe, secure and confidential manner.  Unauthorized distribution, disclosure, or failure to maintain confidentiality may subject you to federal and state penalties. If you are not the intended recipient, please immediately notify us by return email, and delete this message from your computer.
----------------------------------------------------------


 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Saint Peters College has migrated students, staff and faculty from an inhouse Exchange environment to Google.

Students are on a separate domain.



From my Android phone on T-Mobile. The first nationwide 4G network.



-------- Original message --------
Subject: Re: [CIO] splitting student and employee email in the cloud
UNM is adopting the Microsoft offering:  O365 in the cloud and Exchange on prem.  Students will move pdq to the cloud/O365.  Faculty and staff default is on prem, but this gives us a single domain for all constituents and allow us to gradually move the willing faculty and staff  from prem to cloud over the next several years in a seamless way, using Outlook as the primary client for faculty/staff, even as they move to the cloud. 
 
Moira.

 
Moira Gerety
Deputy CIO and Director, Classroom Technologies (Acting) 
Information Technologies
University of New Mexico  87131
(505) 277-0752
>>> Casey Green / Campus Computing <cgreen@CAMPUSCOMPUTING.NET> 12/7/2011 5:38 PM >>>

Data from the 2011 Campus Computing Survey reveal that while campuses across all sectors are moving to hosted email for their students, institutions have been far less willing to migrate faculty, administrators, and staff to third-party, cloud-based email services.  

As shown in the table below (and attached), more than two-thirds of universities, public four-year colleges, and community colleges are currently converting to or are now using hosted/outsourced email for students.  In contrast, less than a fourth have moved to hosted email services for faculty, staff, and administrators.


The movement towards hosted email for students has been surprisingly fast, up from 42.2 percent of the institutions participating in the 2008 Campus Computing Survey to 67.5 percent in 2011.  In contrast, the migration to hosted email for campus personnel has lagged well behind the student migration: 14.8 percent in 2088, rising to 22.8 percent in fall 2011.

As noted in the 2011 Campus Computing Report, there are many reasons to migrate to outsourced student email services.  Clearly budget issues are a catalyst: eliminating student email allows institutions to redeploy money and other IT resources; the financial savings can run from small to significant.  Moreover, unlike their counterparts of just a decade ago, email is no longer a rite of passage experience for today's college freshmen:  students (of all ages) now "arrive" on campus with multiple email addresses linked to well-established email identities and preferences.    Concurrently, there are also compelling reasons why campuses are not moving campus personnel to outsourced email, primarily concerns about confidentiality and eDiscovery.

The migration to outsourced apps (Google Docs; Microsoft 360) has been much slower than the migration to outsourced email.  Just 15 percent of the institutions participating in the 2011 Campus Computing Survey report that they are "converting to/now using" either Google Apps or Microsoft Office Live; the numbers range from 13 percent in community colleges to 28 percent in public research universities.
 

Casey Green
Campus Computing

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
 Kenneth C. Green   818.990.2212
 The Campus Computing Project®
 www.campuscomputing.net
 cgreen@campuscomputing.net
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

----------------------------------------------------------
IMPORTANT WARNING:  This email (and any attachments) is only intended for the use of the person or entity to which it is addressed, and may contain information that is privileged and confidential.  You, the recipient, are obligated to maintain it in a safe, secure and confidential manner.  Unauthorized distribution, disclosure, or failure to maintain confidentiality may subject you to federal and state penalties. If you are not the intended recipient, please immediately notify us by return email, and delete this message from your computer.
----------------------------------------------------------


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Chris,

We were in a split Google/Exchange environment for a year and a half before moving everyone to Google this past summer.

If there is any way to give faculty and staff pilot group a good test of Google, I encourage you to do so.  Google is about much more than mail and calendar.  Docs and Sites can be transformative collaborative tools.

Rick
Associate Provost for Technology & Information Systems



Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
View Proceedings

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.