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I have been asked to do a professional development workshop for HS teachers.  The topic for the presentation is "Technology Skills for the Incoming College Freshman."  What technology skill set topics do you feel that I should incorporate into this presentation/discussion?
 
Thanks.
 
Bill Swisher
 
 
 
 
William Swisher
William.Swisher@Thomasmore.edu
http://www.thomasmore.edu
Director of IT
Thomas More College
333 Thomas More Parkway
Crestview Hills
KY
41017
859-344-3600
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Very high on the list has to be the ability to do quality online research. Google and Wikipedia may have worked in HS. They won't be enough in college. This includes knowing how to construct meaningful searches using appropriate terminology, knowing how to discern and evaluate search results, knowing research resources beyond Google and Wikipedia, when to use them and how to use them.
 
Rick DeVries
Calvin College


>>> William Swisher <Bill.Swisher@THOMASMORE.EDU> 2/21/2012 2:36 PM >>>
I have been asked to do a professional development workshop for HS teachers.  The topic for the presentation is "Technology Skills for the Incoming College Freshman."  What technology skill set topics do you feel that I should incorporate into this presentation/discussion?
 
Thanks.
 
Bill Swisher
 
 
 
 
William Swisher
William.Swisher@Thomasmore.edu
http://www.thomasmore.edu
Director of IT
Thomas More College
333 Thomas More Parkway
Crestview Hills
KY
41017
859-344-3600
Note:
The information contained in this email is confidential and may be subject to legal privilege. If you are not the intended recipient, you must not use, copy, distribute or disclose the email or any part of its contents or take any action in reliance on it. If you have received this email in error, please email the sender by replying to this message. All reasonable precautions have been taken to ensure no viruses are present in this email. Thomas More College cannot accept responsibility for loss or damage arising from the use of this email or attachments and recommend that you subject these to your virus checking procedures prior to use.

Visit Thomas More College (http://www.thomasmore.edu/) on the web.
Wow, Bill, this question leaves open all kinds of possibilities assuming that it is not just "technical" skills but information about the intersection of law, policy, technical security, on-line identity and privacy as well as information fluency.  Parents may also want something directed to them about the experience that their child is likely to have at your institution.   

I join you in the desire to learn about programs that integrate all of these issues.  

We still have many in silos.  Here are some links:

Technology Overall, directed to Family Support: This is the big one, and may meet your needs best:  http://www.it.cornell.edu/services/guides/families/index.cfm

Copyright: This one video remains fairly popular because it is nonjudgmental even though it is a bit outdated and is delivered as a required step in the provisioning of an electronic identifier:  

Security: Our Handbook is chock full of information and well designed although it is still delivered "statically" and not required material for review:  

Digital Literacy: Is not the same as a full program of information fluency, but it is a start, and still in beta (send suggestions of other links or thoughts for material!):  http://digitalliteracy.cornell.edu/

I would be very interested to hear from any schools that have pulled these silo-ed issues into an integrated program that crisply hits the mark for in-coming students.

Thanks for redirecting us to this important question, Bill.

Tracy


A little data never hurts. The 2011 ECAR National Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology asked students whether their skills in specific areas meet their needs as students. Here are some results from the report ( http://www.educause.edu/2011StudentStudy ): Percentage of students who do not believe their skill levels meet their needs to use: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Spreadsheets 41% E-books or e-textbooks 39% Course or learning management system 32% Presentation software 32% College/university library website 27% Word processing 15% Percentage of students who say “I wish I knew how to use it better”: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Programming language (e.g., C++, Java) 48% Audio-creation software 41% E-portfolios 40% Geotagging, geotagged environments 40% Speech recognition software 38% Video creation software 37% Social studying sites 37% Freely available course content beyond campus 35% Graphics software (e.g., Photoshop, Flash) 27% Web-based citation/bibliography tools 23% Simulations or educational games 20% Good luck, Bill! -Susan Susan Grajek Vice President for Data, Research & Analytics EDUCAUSE Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good http://educause.edu 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036 202-331-5350 (phone) sgrajek@educause.edu
Something on cellphone etiquette would have value. Lanny ----- Original Message ----- From: Susan Grajek [mailto:sgrajek@EDUCAUSE.EDU] Sent: Tuesday, February 21, 2012 03:02 PM To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [CIO] Technology for Incoming Freshman A little data never hurts. The 2011 ECAR National Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology asked students whether their skills in specific areas meet their needs as students. Here are some results from the report ( http://www.educause.edu/2011StudentStudy ): Percentage of students who do not believe their skill levels meet their needs to use: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Spreadsheets 41% E-books or e-textbooks 39% Course or learning management system 32% Presentation software 32% College/university library website 27% Word processing 15% Percentage of students who say “I wish I knew how to use it better”: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Programming language (e.g., C++, Java) 48% Audio-creation software 41% E-portfolios 40% Geotagging, geotagged environments 40% Speech recognition software 38% Video creation software 37% Social studying sites 37% Freely available course content beyond campus 35% Graphics software (e.g., Photoshop, Flash) 27% Web-based citation/bibliography tools 23% Simulations or educational games 20% Good luck, Bill! -Susan Susan Grajek Vice President for Data, Research & Analytics EDUCAUSE Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good http://educause.edu 1150 18th Street NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036 202-331-5350 (phone) sgrajek@educause.edu
Bill, In light of Susan's reference to the ECAR Survey of Students and Technology Here's one from Atomic Learning that is designed and built as a self-assessment instrument for students. Very basic in some ways, but when one considers what students self-identified as areas of deficiency, this could prove to be useful. http://www.atomiclearning.com/highed/assessyourself We have not yet put this in place, but are considering it as a measure of baseline skills for our new students. Good luck! Jeff Jeffrey C. Cepull | Vice President for Information Resources and CIO | Philadelphia University | 215-951-2516 | 215-951-6852 - FAX Please consider the environment before printing this email
Bill,

I truly appreciate Lanny Arvan's suggestion about etiquette.  I would certainly endorse the need for students to have good cell phone etiquette, and I would go a notch or two further to say they need a broad range of technology etiquettes - email, text message, threaded discussion, Facebook, etc.  I am continuously amazed at some of the behavior and language (bad grammar to profanity) students exhibit in digital communications.  Among all the skills and talents they develop in college, probably most important is learning to be professional and effective communicators.  I don't think a lot of students see these various media in those terms.  Further more, there is a ton or evidence that demonstrates one poorly worded email or inappropriate Facebook post can haunt an individual for years.  Most students already know how to use these technologies, but do they know how to use them effectively and appropriately?

Joe
______________________________________
Joseph Moreau
Chief Technology Officer
State University of New York at Oswego
509 Culkin Hall
7060 State Route 104
Oswego, NY  13126
joseph.moreau@oswego.edu
315-312-5500 office
315-806-2166 mobile
315-312-5799 fax
______________________________________


This is a bit off topic but interesting non-the-less. I attended the last ELI 2012 conference just last week. One of a three part presentation was on training Freshmen on necessary technologies. University of Wisconsin-Whitewater has what they call TechQuest 2011. TechQuest 2011: A Fresh Approach to Student Technology Training Annette Guye-Kordus, Technology Advancement, Communications and Training, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Jerzy Jura, Technology Advancement & Training Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater Renee Pfeifer-Luckett, Director, Learning Technology Center, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater The successful implementation of TechQuest 2011, an online technology orientation program for students at the University of Wisconsin–Whitewater, required the involvement of a diverse group of university staff and students. This new and innovative program offers students guided multimedia tours of campus technology resources. In this showcase session, we will articulate key program success factors, review the implementation timeline, overview the results of a participant survey, and provide a checklist of best practices for implementing such a training program on other campuses. http://www.educause.edu/ELI12/Program/SESS34 God bless, Sam Young Chief Information Officer Point Loma Nazarene University Individualization ~ Achiever ~ Learner ~ Belief ~ Activator From: Joseph Moreau > Reply-To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 13:49:04 -0800 To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > Subject: Re: [CIO] Technology for Incoming Freshman Bill, I truly appreciate Lanny Arvan's suggestion about etiquette. I would certainly endorse the need for students to have good cell phone etiquette, and I would go a notch or two further to say they need a broad range of technology etiquettes - email, text message, threaded discussion, Facebook, etc. I am continuously amazed at some of the behavior and language (bad grammar to profanity) students exhibit in digital communications. Among all the skills and talents they develop in college, probably most important is learning to be professional and effective communicators. I don't think a lot of students see these various media in those terms. Further more, there is a ton or evidence that demonstrates one poorly worded email or inappropriate Facebook post can haunt an individual for years. Most students already know how to use these technologies, but do they know how to use them effectively and appropriately? Joe ______________________________________ Joseph Moreau Chief Technology Officer State University of New York at Oswego 509 Culkin Hall 7060 State Route 104 Oswego, NY 13126 joseph.moreau@oswego.edu 315-312-5500 office 315-806-2166 mobile 315-312-5799 fax ______________________________________

Matt Ivester's book, Lol...OMG! What Every Studenty Needs To Know About Online Reputation Management, Digital Citizenship, and Cyberbullying has some good nuggets of info you might find useful.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Chuck

 

 

Chuck Lanham

University of Idaho

Senior IT Director

 

Message from mike.cunningham@pct.edu

Isn’t a lot of this the job of higher education and not K-12? K-12 has their hands full just getting most students to an acceptable level of reading, writing and math to get them ready for college.

 

Message from shelf@westernu.edu

Food for thought, and respectfully:

Is the ability to do “quality online research”, or, research via any other medium, for that matter, really a technology skill, or, is it, an academic one, in the broadest sense?

I apologize if this seems pedantic, in any way, but, is this not a critical thinking issue which transcends tech?

Sincerely,

 

Scott Helf, DO, MSIT

Chief Technology Officer-COMP

Director, Academic Informatics

Assistant Professor

 

Department of Academic Informatics

Office of Academic Affairs

College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific

Western University of Health Sciences

309 East 2nd Street

Pomona, CA  91766

 

909-781-4353

shelf@westernu.edu

 

www.westernu.edu

 

 

 

Hi Rick,

We developed a rubric for technology outcomes that has been slightly revised and incorporated into our University Core Curriculum now.

 

Technology Competencies for William Paterson University Students (draft)

1. Communication & Collaboration: Students use technology that mediates communication across time and distance as well as technology that enhances face-to-face sharing of ideas and information.

Beginning

Competent

Advanced

Students have limited knowledge of suggested technology and are unable to communicate and collaborate using technology.

Students will communicate and collaborate using the suggested technology to share ideas with others.

Students effectively communicate and collaborate using technology to enhance engagement; producing and sharing appropriate digital media for an intended audience and purpose.

Ex. When given an assignment to “create a multimedia presentation (e.g. PowerPoint) on invasive plant species in NJ” the competent student will create an appropriate PowerPoint. The advanced student will create a web page with links to other resources on the topic, and a YouTube video of themselves pointing out invasive plants in a local park.

2. Research and Information Fluency: Students use a variety of technologies to access, evaluate, collect, and manage data, information and datasets.

Beginning

Competent

Advanced

Students have difficulty or are unable to use technology to gather and store information digitally.

Students use technology to gather digital information from a designated source and have a basic way to store this information.

Students use technology to gather digital information from a variety of sources and effectively evaluate, sort, organize, plan, and store this information so that it can be successfully used for the intended purpose.

Ex. When given an assignment to “write a properly formatted paper on American women poets, starting with Anne Bradstreet” the competent student will have appropriate references listed in a bibliography. The advance student will have organized the paper into sections/chapters and also organized their references into appropriate endnotes. The advanced student may also use a variety of media sources (ex. the movie “Sylvia”) beyond the academic journals suggested by the professor.

3. Critical Thinking,

Problem Solving and Decision Making: Students can effectively and creatively use technology to aid in these processes.

Beginning

Competent

Advanced

Students demonstrate little or no ability to select and use technology as a tool to process, analyze and/or synthesize data in order to better understand a specific problem.

Students use a designated technology tool that lets them process, analyze and/or synthesize data and information in order to better understand a specific problem.

Students use the appropriate technology tool that lets them process, analyze data and/or synthesize data and information to reach a strongly supported outcome.

Ex. When given an assignment to “collect the Gini coefficient and GPD data for 20 countries in each economic bracket and graph them”, the competent student will use a spreadsheet program and create a separate table and graph for each economic bracket. The advanced student will create one table with added economic bracket data and then create a pivot table to sort and analyze the data.

4. Digital Citizenship: Students understand the impact of technology on themselves, their culture, their environment and their society and practice  legal and ethical behaviors

Beginning

Competent

Advanced

Students demonstrate little or no understanding of concepts related to the appropriate, ethical, legal, responsible and safe technology usage.

Students demonstrate appropriate, ethical, legal, responsible, and safe technology usage.

Students understand the benefits and consequences of technology in their lives and in the world, and advocate and demonstrate appropriate, ethical, legal, responsible, and safe technology usage.

Ex. When given an assignment to write a paper on the emotional stages in child development, the competent student will use appropriate citations and if using interview or personal webspace (e.g. blog, facebook) information will observe all confidentiality guidelines. The advanced student will also include a section of the paper looking into the effects of new social-networking and role-playing technologies on children’s emotional development.

5. Technology Concepts and Operations: Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems and operations

Beginning

Competent

Advanced

Students demonstrate little or no ability to use technologies to effectively complete assignments.

Students use technologies to effectively and competently complete assignments.

Students demonstrate advanced and/or specialized technological skills in their processes or output.

Ex. for any assignment, the competent student has few if any ‘glitches’ (badly timed slide transitions, bugs, badly formatted printed papers, etc.) and the advanced student’s product looks professionally done.

 

Hope this helps,

Sandie

 

 

Sandra L. Miller, Ed.D.

Director of Instruction & Research Technology

William Paterson University

300 Pompton Road

Wayne, NJ  07470

973.720.2530

millers@wpunj.edu

P Think before you print