Main Nav

Issue #4: Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through Information Technology

Today, using information technology to improve operational efficiency is no longer just desirable; it has become an imperative due to the ever-shrinking resources brought about by the current economic downturn. Most institutions have many of the required technologies (e.g., workflow, electronic forms, and digital signing) in place, but not everyone has broadly restructured business processes to take advantage of the new technologies.

____

Continuing our summer discussion of the Educause Top 10 issues, let's move to Issue #4, stated above.  What are the obstacles that stop you from fully implementing or deriving benefit from IT designed to improve efficiency?  One of our biggest challenges has been to find the technologies that are affordable and easy to implement.



--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Not to be glib, but the largest issue is the lack of desire on the part of functional users to adopt different practices. The reasons for this behavior may be rooted in: insufficient business process redesign: lack of staff, time, energy on some functional staff; fear that new processes will diminish the status/role of the individual; fear of letting go of or transferring responsibility for data/processes… all these people things…Most all the products work pretty well out of the box…

 

Best, Rob

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

Message from slowe@1610group.com

Rob,

Bingo.  Nail on the head.

I've run into that on numerous process improvement efforts in an institution with a culture where *anyone* could simply opt out of a process change and effectively kill it.  Extremely difficult and it takes major support from the very top of the organization -- in both words AND deeds; words alone are insufficient -- to even begin to crack the nut.  The change has to be institutionalized and become part of the routine, but for many of the reasons that you stated, it's a major challenge in many places.

Turning IT from what many see as a cost center to being seen as a business enabler is an incredible step forward, but one that takes sheer will, determination and group support.

I've been working with another institution on BPR and we''re taking a somewhat slower, but more broad approach to the change and early signs show positive results.

Scott Lowe
Founder and Managing Consultant
The 1610 Group
(573) 592-9070

I am curious if anyone has tried coming at this specifically from  a “Lean” process improvement methodology (as opposed to any other BPR approach) with any success?  The premise of Lean is to ‘eliminate waste’ in processes, and drive up customer value (as defined by the customer).   This of course includes our internal customers.  Lean is not (and isn’t meant to be) exclusively an “IT” initiative.  But in terms of establishing an institutional ‘beach head’ and getting traction, there are probably few internal organizational units that are as steeped in methodology and frameworks (eg. COBIT, ITIL, PMBok, etc etc). 

 

Dave  

 

 

David Cresswell, MBA
  Assoc. Director, Strategic Practices

   
IT Services
British Columbia Institute of Technology
3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, BC, V5G 3H2

Tel: 604.432.8729 · Mobile: 604.341.7420 · Fax: 604.439.6785
Email: Dave_Cresswell@bcit.ca · Web: bcit.ca/its

It's your career. Get it right.


P
Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.
_______________________________________________________________

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Scott Lowe
Sent: Monday, August 13, 2012 11:48 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

Rob,

 

Bingo.  Nail on the head.

 

I've run into that on numerous process improvement efforts in an institution with a culture where *anyone* could simply opt out of a process change and effectively kill it.  Extremely difficult and it takes major support from the very top of the organization -- in both words AND deeds; words alone are insufficient -- to even begin to crack the nut.  The change has to be institutionalized and become part of the routine, but for many of the reasons that you stated, it's a major challenge in many places.

 

Turning IT from what many see as a cost center to being seen as a business enabler is an incredible step forward, but one that takes sheer will, determination and group support.

 

I've been working with another institution on BPR and we''re taking a somewhat slower, but more broad approach to the change and early signs show positive results.

 

Scott Lowe

Founder and Managing Consultant

The 1610 Group

(573) 592-9070

 

We do have a lean institute on our campus - Pawley Lean Institute http://www.oakland.edu/lean/
Our university does use this process for campus initiatives - you can read some by going through the timeline here:  http://www.oakland.edu/?id=15178&sid=12

However, the focus of the thinking is quite different from an IT process  improvement focus.  Sometimes someone from our IT area is on the lean initiative team, but often we do not have anyone on the team.  The focus is developing a lean process, rather than using technology to improve processes.  That difference in focus can result in very different results.

Theresa

We are not talking about an IT improvement process here but a business functional process improvement that enables the effective use of information. From where I sit the functional areas need to be willing to take stock in what they do, how they accomplish their tasks and determine whether the appropriate efficiencies are in place (with the use of technologies and systems) that can allow them to spend more time with their clients (not hiding behind technologies). Whether its lean of business process improvements or sticky notes on a wall detailing every step of the "how to" get something done, our colleagues in the business areas (data owners) have got to be willing participants if we are to be successful in analyzing what we are doing and how we are going to change it if needed. If analytics, or just the effective use of accurate information gathered over time, is to be central to how we make decisions and determine future actions, then everyone needs to play a role, not just IT. We are starting down a road now where we (IT) are being proactive in identifying issues or possible improvements to process based on outside analysis and working with the areas affected to develop an improvement plan to make these changes. It will be a very slow process, one in which we will more than likely play the bad cop, but it's part of our overall strategic plan for the university and needs to be accomplished. Tom Thomas H. Carnwath Vice President Technology and Information Services Hamilton Hall 320 South Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19102 Tel: 215-717-6440 [cid:240E1860-6CBC-44F1-AAFC-8E7046152A77] Need Assistance? Call OOPS (215-717-6677) to get answers. OTIS will never ask for your personal information or password in an email. Never share this information with anyone. This message and any attachment may contain confidential or privileged information and is intended for the intended individual named as addressee. If you are not the intended recipient of this message, please notify the sender immediately by return email and delete this message and all attachments from your system. Any unauthorized disclosure, use, distribution, or reproduction of this message or any attachments is prohibited and may be deemed unlawful. Please consider the environment before printing this email. From: Theresa Rowe > Reply-To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > Date: Monday, August 13, 2012 2:31 PM To: EDUCAUSE Listserv > Subject: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT Issue #4: Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through Information Technology Today, using information technology to improve operational efficiency is no longer just desirable; it has become an imperative due to the ever-shrinking resources brought about by the current economic downturn. Most institutions have many of the required technologies (e.g., workflow, electronic forms, and digital signing) in place, but not everyone has broadly restructured business processes to take advantage of the new technologies. ____ Continuing our summer discussion of the Educause Top 10 issues, let's move to Issue #4, stated above. What are the obstacles that stop you from fully implementing or deriving benefit from IT designed to improve efficiency? One of our biggest challenges has been to find the technologies that are affordable and easy to implement. -- Theresa Rowe Chief Information Officer Oakland University ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
I've clearly spent too much time on Facebook...I just spent 10 seconds looking for the "Like" button!!

I think Rob's identified the biggest barrier to any efficiency: people.  For example: my campus is split roughly 65/35, Windows/Mac (Faculty desktops.  Labs/classrooms are all dual-boot Mac.).  For many years I have thought to myself, "Oh, the wonderful things we could do if we were JUST ONE!"  And frankly, I don't care which; be it MacOS, Windows, or even Linux.  Providing solutions to the lowest common denominator between 2 operating systems is exhausting, not efficient.  But no one would dare tell our users what computer they could or couldn't use in their work.  So we attempt to be all things to all users and, for the most part, we pull it off.  But I'd hardly label that "efficient."

$0.02,
Romeyn


Much if not all of the credit for this goes to my predecessor (who is on this list somewhere, I'm sure), but I'll be watching over time what has been actually pretty good buy-in for improving business processes through IT.  I've been here 2 weeks and we've just launched a module for accessing budgets through our college's portal and that has given incredible momentum to adding a PO/encumbrance module as well, which should be rolled out within the next 2 weeks.  The business/finance office here, not surprisingly, wants to provide budget managers the ability to at least see the current status of their finances. 
 
From what I can tell, at least 4-5 other managers are quite excited about this.  Again, we're small, so that's not an insignificant number. 
 
There is a lot of interest here in business intelligence of some kind - and not just as a catch phrase.  Not everyone realizes they're talking about the same thing but just capturing data that can be manipulated in various ways for different purposes to figure out whether we are "succeeding" or not.  Putting in a BI system at our college would be a non-trivial task, but there is a lot of energy there that can and should be tapped. 
 
Finally, talks about the little things like electronic signatures, etc are popping up. 
 
I realize that saying "I've observed this" doesn't really add much to the conversation.  But it's something that has been a nice surprise (again, kudos to my predecessor for whatever expectations management and buy-in she built) and that I'll be watching and hopefully utilizing moving forward. 
 
The obvious questions are whether it's due to size of college, size of specific offices, perhaps even proximity of offices at a college of our size, etc. 
 
random thoughts,
allan

I believe that Rob’s answer wasn’t glib, and together with Romeyn, they have correctly identified what is often the fundamental roadblock to progress:  People do not like change.  This was especially true at my institution where middle management, a/k/a our Deans, Directors and Chairs successfully fought off an ERP project for more than 10 years.  In the end it took a strong Presidential mandate to force the issue and even then, the institution went kicking against the project until it was clear it was unstoppable.  That is when the realization came that they had to get involved to insure it would work well for them.  From that point, the customer (read: end user) took ownership and we succeeded, largely in their minds, despite the IT leadership in place.  Today those same people take pride in their efforts to run the system well for their constituents.

 

The key for us, as technology leaders, to remove this problem lies in building strong collaborative relationships with our peers in senior leadership of our institutions.  Our Provost, CFO and President must believe that we understand their needs and our working with them to provide what they need.  That involves our using business skills:  sales savvy, the ability to understand financials, politicking, educating our peers on what technology can do and relationship building.  Once that collaborative rapport is established we can move together with our customer to produce intelligent solutions that incorporate business process redesign and the right technologies.

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan Chen
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2012 11:00 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

Much if not all of the credit for this goes to my predecessor (who is on this list somewhere, I'm sure), but I'll be watching over time what has been actually pretty good buy-in for improving business processes through IT.  I've been here 2 weeks and we've just launched a module for accessing budgets through our college's portal and that has given incredible momentum to adding a PO/encumbrance module as well, which should be rolled out within the next 2 weeks.  The business/finance office here, not surprisingly, wants to provide budget managers the ability to at least see the current status of their finances. 

 

From what I can tell, at least 4-5 other managers are quite excited about this.  Again, we're small, so that's not an insignificant number. 

 

There is a lot of interest here in business intelligence of some kind - and not just as a catch phrase.  Not everyone realizes they're talking about the same thing but just capturing data that can be manipulated in various ways for different purposes to figure out whether we are "succeeding" or not.  Putting in a BI system at our college would be a non-trivial task, but there is a lot of energy there that can and should be tapped. 

 

Finally, talks about the little things like electronic signatures, etc are popping up. 

 

I realize that saying "I've observed this" doesn't really add much to the conversation.  But it's something that has been a nice surprise (again, kudos to my predecessor for whatever expectations management and buy-in she built) and that I'll be watching and hopefully utilizing moving forward. 

 

The obvious questions are whether it's due to size of college, size of specific offices, perhaps even proximity of offices at a college of our size, etc. 

 

random thoughts,

allan

Hello, everyone. Sean Jackson here. I’m the CIO at the University of Virginia School of Medicine and the University of Virginia Physicians Group. I too believe that Rob’s answer wasn’t glib. In fact, I have often been (humorously) frank with colleagues who attempt to make “their (current) process problem my (new) system problem.” J That usually gets an appropriate level of attention and serves as a good beginning to a discussion about how IT can collaborate with them to improve and then automate a particular process.

 

One of the things that drew my attention to this thread was a mention earlier about Lean. I am a Lean practitioner and have been on my journey for over a decade now. I am passionate about Lean because it offers a rich set of tools and concepts to support crucial conversations and develop shared insights. With Lean we start our conversation with the customer and consider value, waste, and time, how we can make work visible, and how we can measure, improve, and automate it. During the process, sometimes folks can’t help themselves from dropping into a kind of classical “the system shall…” requirements capture/“silver bullet” mode. With a reminder I’ve found that they are willing to refocus on the process.

 

We adopted Lean (and Agile) in IT when I arrived here about two years ago. I recently partnered with a colleague on the faculty at Darden to help introduce Lean to other areas of the medical school, as well as departments in the medical center and physicians group as part of a multi-organization process improvement project. I have found the Darden partnership invaluable and I would encourage IT leaders with access to a business school to cast about for Lean folks among the faculty for help.

 

I have other thoughts and observations about Lean that I am happy to share, but I don’t want to hijack the thread, especially with this being my first posting to the list.

 

Thank you,

--sean

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Doug Kahn
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2012 11:16 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

I believe that Rob’s answer wasn’t glib, and together with Romeyn, they have correctly identified what is often the fundamental roadblock to progress:  People do not like change.  This was especially true at my institution where middle management, a/k/a our Deans, Directors and Chairs successfully fought off an ERP project for more than 10 years.  In the end it took a strong Presidential mandate to force the issue and even then, the institution went kicking against the project until it was clear it was unstoppable.  That is when the realization came that they had to get involved to insure it would work well for them.  From that point, the customer (read: end user) took ownership and we succeeded, largely in their minds, despite the IT leadership in place.  Today those same people take pride in their efforts to run the system well for their constituents.

 

The key for us, as technology leaders, to remove this problem lies in building strong collaborative relationships with our peers in senior leadership of our institutions.  Our Provost, CFO and President must believe that we understand their needs and our working with them to provide what they need.  That involves our using business skills:  sales savvy, the ability to understand financials, politicking, educating our peers on what technology can do and relationship building.  Once that collaborative rapport is established we can move together with our customer to produce intelligent solutions that incorporate business process redesign and the right technologies.

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan Chen
Sent: Thursday, August 16, 2012 11:00 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

Much if not all of the credit for this goes to my predecessor (who is on this list somewhere, I'm sure), but I'll be watching over time what has been actually pretty good buy-in for improving business processes through IT.  I've been here 2 weeks and we've just launched a module for accessing budgets through our college's portal and that has given incredible momentum to adding a PO/encumbrance module as well, which should be rolled out within the next 2 weeks.  The business/finance office here, not surprisingly, wants to provide budget managers the ability to at least see the current status of their finances. 

 

From what I can tell, at least 4-5 other managers are quite excited about this.  Again, we're small, so that's not an insignificant number. 

 

There is a lot of interest here in business intelligence of some kind - and not just as a catch phrase.  Not everyone realizes they're talking about the same thing but just capturing data that can be manipulated in various ways for different purposes to figure out whether we are "succeeding" or not.  Putting in a BI system at our college would be a non-trivial task, but there is a lot of energy there that can and should be tapped. 

 

Finally, talks about the little things like electronic signatures, etc are popping up. 

 

I realize that saying "I've observed this" doesn't really add much to the conversation.  But it's something that has been a nice surprise (again, kudos to my predecessor for whatever expectations management and buy-in she built) and that I'll be watching and hopefully utilizing moving forward. 

 

The obvious questions are whether it's due to size of college, size of specific offices, perhaps even proximity of offices at a college of our size, etc. 

 

random thoughts,

allan

Hi All

   Excellent question and some very insightful answers. Since the original question was around obstacles, here are my thoughts:
  • A wise CIO from a small liberal arts school in the Northeast reminded us at a meeting that many of the obstacles arise "because all these issues are local". So true.
  • We are in a space where we are so interconnected, process oriented and our desire to reach a consensus on even the minutest aspect of a process all add up to the list of grand obstacles. We have managed to overcome this through relationship and trust building by delivering quickly on some high impact projects as well as use the governance committees to help resolve conflicts as expeditiously as possible.
  • The other major obstacle can be the differing views between the technologists and the functional office leads on the question of operational efficiency for the functional office. Many a times we may not know all the issues involved when we offer a solution.  As always, the truth is somewhere in the middle and success relies on willingness to compromise, good communication and outreach.
  • Articulating exactly how the efficiencies can be realized, measured and at what cost is important. I present a list of ideas to my senior staff annually, and a few are enthusiastically endorsed but a few that appears to be a no-brainer from my perspective,  gets shot down for mostly cultural and historical reasons (because the real cost of this can be very high). The accepted list then goes through the collaborative project prioritization process with support from the senior staff.
  • Where exactly you are in the technology spectrum is a huge factor in your ability to introduce efficiencies. For eg.,  our ability to quickly move Wellesley College to Google Apps and Drupal resulted from the fact that their predecessors were FirstClass and a web content management system called Bluenog respectively.
  • The worst of the obstacles is the poor technologies that we rely on out of necessity (ERPs for eg.). These impose severe restrictions on our ability to introduce efficiencies and require us to fit our core business needs to their design rather than the reverse. Every upgrade requires so many person hours annually to simply plan, test and implement,  and we quickly run out of resources to innovate. (An English prof. at the previous institution I worked asked me "Why is it that every time you call it an upgrade, it is actually a downgrade for me?")
  • Serious misunderstanding of time commitments for implementing "new efficiencies" by the functional offices often results in them feeling burned out. This results in reluctance for additional projects. 

-- Ravi
CIO, Wellesley College
Google Voice - 860-631-RAVI



Going back to an earlier topic...I'm tossing around the idea of creating a position for someone that works primarily with the data in our ERP but for the explicit purpose of improving operational efficiency for all the departments that use that data.  Our ERP is still relatively new to the college and not everyone has a complete grasp on what can be done.  So this person would consult with departments, identify how things might be done more efficiently, work with the ERP data accordingly and/or create reporting tools, and help implement solutions.  In the long term, creation of a dashboard (with needed flexibility) is not out of the question.  Implementation of a full blown BI system is unlikely as they are generally out of our ballpark, price-wise.

I know that some colleges and universities have project management (lean operations, even) offices that help with this.  

I can write the description itself, but am trying to figure out compensation.  Looking at outside, professional consultants as comparables gives me less-than-ideal information.  Is anyone willing to share some guidance?  Obviously feel free to write me offline.

thanks,
allan

Allen,

 

Do you have an IR office? Try consolidating the data analyses in that locale. Dashboard creation, reporting, “using the system” for business analyses. Works better than IT folks because the IT people can write the reports but may not know what the “answer” is supposed to be. The IR folks are very particular that the data in the reports is correct.

 

I am fortunate that both operations report to me.

 

We can discuss more in Memphis at SIGUCCS… ;-)

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President – Information Technology, Planning and Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan Chen
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2012 4:05 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

Going back to an earlier topic...I'm tossing around the idea of creating a position for someone that works primarily with the data in our ERP but for the explicit purpose of improving operational efficiency for all the departments that use that data.  Our ERP is still relatively new to the college and not everyone has a complete grasp on what can be done.  So this person would consult with departments, identify how things might be done more efficiently, work with the ERP data accordingly and/or create reporting tools, and help implement solutions.  In the long term, creation of a dashboard (with needed flexibility) is not out of the question.  Implementation of a full blown BI system is unlikely as they are generally out of our ballpark, price-wise.

 

I know that some colleges and universities have project management (lean operations, even) offices that help with this.  

 

I can write the description itself, but am trying to figure out compensation.  Looking at outside, professional consultants as comparables gives me less-than-ideal information.  Is anyone willing to share some guidance?  Obviously feel free to write me offline.

 

thanks,

allan

 

Rob,
No, we don't have an IR office.  We do have someone that does assessment.  Closest thing and I'm going to give her a call but I do know what you mean.  It was no surprise that when Santa Clara was looking at full-blown, enterprise BI solutions the folks that had the most questions were from IR (though the Law School came in a close second!).  

SIGUCCS can't come fast enough for all the questions I already have for you :-)
allan

Dear Allan,

The UNSW – Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra, Australia, is a small university campus of the University of New South Wales, and although we share some of the systems with the main campus in Sydney, we have our own requirements in terms of IT and IM.

 

I have taken the initiative of creating an information management area within our IT group – although I agree with Robert Paterson comments about hosting the role of manipulating ERP data outside IT, nobody was ready to take this responsibility in our campus. L

 

As such, I now have an information manager which priority is to get out there to the schools, admin and support areas, understanding their information management needs, how they use the different systems, and identify areas for improvement, automation and potentially business process changes. I was fortunate enough to hire someone with business analysis experience, we are a small team and skills in different areas is a paramount for our staff members.

 

Cheers,

 

Newton Braga

Head of ICT Services

UNSW - Australian Defence Force Academy

Northcott Drive, Canberra ACT 2600

Phone: +61 2 6268 8134 | Fax: +61 2 6268 8150 | Email: n.braga@adfa.edu.au

Blog: http://www.onlinenewscentre.com/

LinkedIn: http://au.linkedin.com/in/nbraga

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nsbraga

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Allan Chen
Sent: Tuesday, 28 August 2012 6:05 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #4 - Improving the Institution's Operational Efficiency through IT

 

Going back to an earlier topic...I'm tossing around the idea of creating a position for someone that works primarily with the data in our ERP but for the explicit purpose of improving operational efficiency for all the departments that use that data.  Our ERP is still relatively new to the college and not everyone has a complete grasp on what can be done.  So this person would consult with departments, identify how things might be done more efficiently, work with the ERP data accordingly and/or create reporting tools, and help implement solutions.  In the long term, creation of a dashboard (with needed flexibility) is not out of the question.  Implementation of a full blown BI system is unlikely as they are generally out of our ballpark, price-wise.

 

I know that some colleges and universities have project management (lean operations, even) offices that help with this.  

 

I can write the description itself, but am trying to figure out compensation.  Looking at outside, professional consultants as comparables gives me less-than-ideal information.  Is anyone willing to share some guidance?  Obviously feel free to write me offline.

 

thanks,

allan

 

Newton,
Thanks for the insight.  Yes, having that diversity is very important - we are a small team as well.  

allan

Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
Register Now!

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.