Main Nav

Issue #6: Using Analytics to Support Critical Institutional OutcomesAccountability and, increasingly, the need to give students the information they require are driving the use of analytics in higher education. Institutions are under continued pressure from accreditors and public funding sources to demonstrate that student outcomes are improving and that institutions are being run efficiently. Students and parents are beginning to clamor for more direct and "real-time" feedback by gaining access to the data that institutions collect about student performance.

____

One of the questions posted is:  Why does analytics matter to the institution? What strategic problems or issues can analytics help the institution address? What will be the institution's initial focus for analytics: institutional performance, student performance?
I think we need to take it down to "What is the interest and role of central IT in analytics?"

This is one where I really need others to jump in. 

Educause has the Analytics Sprint coming up:  http://www.educause.edu/events/educause-analytics-sprint

Jack Suess, John Fritz, and  UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski III speak of an institutional view, partnering with IR:  http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/assessment-and-analytics-institutional-transformation

What do you think?
 
--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

The couple of early AM comments.

 

What I might contribute on this topic relates more to institutional organizational and how the analytics are accumulated for the institution and secondly, and maybe more important, how are key performance indicators (comparisons) established and used….

 

About the first. I’ve always been a small to medium sized schools, so these comments will not pertain to big public state universities, but in my experience the IR department are small (1 to 3 individuals.) In many cases reports are created and submitted by individual offices rather than centralized. Data are not analyzed in a standardized fashion so numbers vary. One of the very intriguing parts of my position at Molloy is that I manage IT, IR and Planning or data management, data analyses, and data use. We have been able to collapse all data analyses and reporting (for external purposes) into the IR office…anyone on campus may run reports but our data is the standard… so the key point I’d make is the “creation of the analytic” is essential if it is to make sense.

 

Secondly, we wrestle about to whom we should compare ourselves. Maybe we are unique in this and maybe the CLAC schools are similar enough that benchmarking against each other makes sense (I doubt even that statement.) But leadership at Molloy has a hard time agreeing on the value of the comparisons with other regional institutions, catholic institutions, or private institutions…..and when we do compare what do we find that helps us plan for the future? Not much. We need to be assessing ourselves, asking  what can we be doing better…. We’ve done a lot of varied analyses including the multivariate manipulations described by Michael Middaugh when he was part of the “Delaware Study to try to determine baseline comparisons… It is a work in progress.

 

So from the CIO’s perspective, analytics just about IT may be too narrow to help the institution, and unless “one” can manage how analytics are calculated for the institution there is going to be wide variety in results. Finally, what I would hate to see would be some set of National produced averages to which we would need to conform…

 

Best,

Rob

 

I think the best

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

I believe the role of central IT in analytics is as a facilitator.  We need to make access to the analytics the institution's leadership uses as easy as possible.
 
We developed a strategic IT plan about a year ago and one of the goals was to provide an "Create an interactive interface to enable timely analysis of longitudinal and cross sectional student and course data".  I asked a sub-committee of the Administrative Technology Committee to define it so that IT could build it.  We now have a vague definition of what it should look like and IT will build something as a first stab at addressing it.  The problem is that no one can agree to a definition of what it should look like or when it is done.
 
I agree with Rob in regards to comparisons.  We have a few similar sized community colleges in Texas we compare ourselves to regularly, but at times people disregard the comparisons for various reasons (dissimilar student populations, etc).  We also have state wide averages we attain to meet distributed by our Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for Higher Education. 
 
As many in IT have a background and an inclination towards logical thinking, we are use that background to provide first drafts of solutions like the "interactive interface..." above.  We work closely with our committees and IR to develop the analytics they are requesting.  We don't drive the process.
 
Dave

 
 
David Hoyt
Chief Information Systems Officer
 
Collin College     
Collin Higher Education Center
3452 Spur 399
McKinney, TX  75069
P - 972.599.3133   F - 972.599.3131
>>> On 7/17/2012 at 6:21 AM, in message <CANep2Tnh-Qv0QtUP92zctp8DJLHnhwiP7wdhKBBro3Q8vW3DvQ@mail.gmail.com>, Theresa Rowe <rowe@OAKLAND.EDU> wrote:
Issue #6: Using Analytics to Support Critical Institutional OutcomesAccountability and, increasingly, the need to give students the information they require are driving the use of analytics in higher education. Institutions are under continued pressure from accreditors and public funding sources to demonstrate that student outcomes are improving and that institutions are being run efficiently. Students and parents are beginning to clamor for more direct and "real-time" feedback by gaining access to the data that institutions collect about student performance.

____

One of the questions posted is: Why does analytics matter to the institution? What strategic problems or issues can analytics help the institution address? What will be the institution's initial focus for analytics: institutional performance, student performance?
I think we need to take it down to "What is the interest and role of central IT in analytics?"

This is one where I really need others to jump in.

Educause has the Analytics Sprint coming up: http://www.educause.edu/events/educause-analytics-sprint

Jack Suess, John Fritz, and UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski III speak of an institutional view, partnering with IR: http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/assessment-and-analytics-institutional-transformation

What do you think?

--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.


I would support David’s comments.

 

Dr. Robert Paterson

Vice President, Information Technology, Planning & Research

Molloy College

Rockville Centre, NY 11571

516-678-5000 ex 6443

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of David
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2012 1:34 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Topic #6 Funding Information Technology Strategically

 

 

Close
Close


Annual Conference
September 29–October 2
Register Now!

Events for all Levels and Interests

Whether you're looking for a conference to attend face-to-face to connect with peers, or for an online event for team professional development, see what's upcoming.

Close

Digital Badges
Member recognition effort
Earn yours >

Career Center


Leadership and Management Programs

EDUCAUSE Institute
Project Management

 

 

Jump Start Your Career Growth

Explore EDUCAUSE professional development opportunities that match your career aspirations and desired level of time investment through our interactive online guide.

 

Close
EDUCAUSE organizes its efforts around three IT Focus Areas

 

 

Join These Programs If Your Focus Is

Close

Get on the Higher Ed IT Map

Employees of EDUCAUSE member institutions and organizations are invited to create individual profiles.
 

 

Close

2014 Strategic Priorities

  • Building the Profession
  • IT as a Game Changer
  • Foundations


Learn More >

Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good™

EDUCAUSE is the foremost community of higher education IT leaders and professionals.