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Is there any school out there that does NOT issue a university email address to students?  If so I would like to talk to you about how that came to be.

 

Andy Jett

Chief Information Officer

Baker University

ajett@bakeru.edu – (913)491-4432

 

 

 

 


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Comments

We stopped providing / issuing student email address 5 years ago, we do not have a plan to change that in the near future. Not saying we will never change back to issuing college email to students but not on the radar currently

 

Todd Jagerson

Chief Information Officer

Dakota County Technical College

Rosemount, MN.

651-423-8518 (office)

612-718-8406 (cell)

 

 

 

When you think about it, prior to ‘90s, most communication to the students was through an address that already belonged to the student (the home address) prior to enrolling.  Since the vast majority of students already come to school with an email address, I don’t see why we couldn’t use that one.  At our school, most students take their college issued email account and forward it to their personal email address.  While I do see obvious benefits of issuing a college email address, I think you could certainly get by without doing so.  To me, the best of both worlds is to use a student Gmail setup or Office 365.  No cost and little management for the school while still having the benefits of a college-issued email address.

 

 

Ken Ihrer

Chief Technology Officer

Department of Information Technology

524 West 59th Street, Suite L2.63.20

New York City, NY  10019

Tel. 212.237.8789

Fax. 212.237.8015

Email. kihrer@jjay.cuny.edu

 

We ask that all technology services, issues and inquiries be initiated through the DoIT Helpdesk. Visit our self-service page at www.jjay.cuny.edu/helpdesk, email at helpdesk@jjay.cuny.edu, or call us at 212.237.8200

 

 

 

I think if we had not changed to Google or the Google / Microsoft 365 offerings had not materialized, we would have gotten out of the email business.  As it is, we do not provide alumni with email.  The only reason we've stayed with Google is that we find that a fair number of incoming freshmen did not have their own email.  There was a shared email at home.  We didn't think that sharing a family email was private enough to meet FERPA requirements and for online learning, as our email is integrated with that environment. 

Theresa


You might find this article in Sunday's NYT an interesting perspective -
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/29/fashion/technology-and-the-college-generation.html?smid=pl-share

Technology and the College Generation


This is interesting. We just semi- implemented the Blackboard Collaborate piece (anyone else??) and I believe it offers the functionality to let the student decide how they want to be contacted. It will be interesting to see what (if anything) they choose should a faculty member choose to use that feature.

 

 

Paige Francis, CIO

Fairfield University

 

Follow me: Twitter | Linked In

Fairfield University Technology News: http://fairfieldutech.tumblr.com

 

CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: The contents of this email message and any attachments are intended solely for the addressee(s) and may contain confidential and/or privileged info rmation and may be legally protected from disclosure. If you are not the intended recipient of this message or their agent, or if this message has been addressed to you in error, please immediately alert the sender by reply email and then delete this message and any attachments. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any use, dissemination, copying, or storage of this message or its attachments is strictly prohibited.

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Theresa Rowe
Sent: Sunday, September 29, 2013 8:18 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

You might find this article in Sunday's NYT an interesting perspective -
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/29/fashion/technology-and-the-college-generation.html?smid=pl-share

Technology and the College Generation

 

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

Rick
We are investigating the notion of federating student accounts so that we can get out of the authentication business and extend our ability to authorize all of our stakeholders into appropriate services. Most, if not all, students have a personal email address that they have had, and will more than likely continue to have, for a long time. In my discussions with them at my last three institutions, they only use their institutional email because they have to and if they are permitted to forward it to their personal account, they generally do. By federating, this satisfies the issue with intellectual content as it stays with their personal account and it also satisfies Alumni/Advancement as the same account that came with them, leaves with them—providing a means for future communication.

I don't believe that we can adequately sustain keeping email accounts perpetually and they remain useful. This will mean that the average person will have at least three email accounts, one from their employer, their personal, and their institutional account. What happens if they go to grad school at another institution? What if they pursue a terminal degree at yet a third institution?

Also, eventually, the usernames will become difficult to remember because the standard algorithms won't work. Folks, when asked, prefer to have ONE identity, if possible.

Mark
______________________________________________
Mark Staples
Vice President & Chief Information Officer
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Division of Technology Services

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115
Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184
email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/markallenstaples
blog: http://blogs.wit.edu/cio
http://www.wit.edu

______________________________________________

"It's not my job to have all the answers, but it is my job to ask lots of penetrating, disturbing, and occasionally almost offensive questions as part of the analytic process that leads to insight and refinement." -Gary Loveman

From: <Matthews>, Rick <matthews@WFU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:12 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

Rick

--
Wake Forest University


Hi All,

 

This is a bit of a tangent to the actual question posted by Andy @Baker U, but since the 9.27.13 NYT article about technology and the college generation was noted in the listserv conversation, I want to offer a few relevant factoids from the annual ECAR Student Tech Survey about students and e-mail use: http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013.

 

Based on ECAR research, we know:

·         The majority of undergrads (66%) want their instructors to use e-mail MORE

·         For the past three years, e-mail has consistently appeared at/near the top of the “use it more” wish list for students (with regard to communicating with their instructors)

·         A deeper dive with undergrad student focus groups told us that students like e-mail because it is asynchronous and highly documentable. Students like to use e-mail to communicate with their instructors over other options because they have a record of the convo. They recognize the value of having a digital trail of submitting assignments, or documenting extensions/changes/exceptions in an e-mail string. These e-mail strings can originate at 3 AM from the student-side and not be disruptive to the instructor, and that’s where the value of an asynchronous option comes into play.

 

I’m not surprised to hear that students spend only 6-minutes a day checking e-mail – they have so many other communication options to “keep connected” so this quantity of time makes sense. But, it is important to recognize that e-mail still serves a purpose in the lives of undergrads. Especially for the student-to-instructor relationship. We’ll investigate how faculty perceive this in the 2014 ECAR faculty study work (right now our story is one-sided, with just undergrads’ experiences captured).

 

ECAR will also investigate students’ daily digital habits (to a greater extent than we have in the past) in the 2014 ECAR student study work to gain more insight about if/how/in what context students expect or prefer to keep connected with one another, their instructors, and their institution. Here is the graphic of how the “use it more/use it less” communication modes was presented in the 2013 ECAR report – more context if offered in the accompanying report text (not re-printed here).

 

If you want your institution to participate in the 2014 student study or the 2014 faculty study, more info can be found at: http://www.educause.edu/ecar/about-ecar/ecar-annual-study-students-and-it/participate-ecar-study-students-and-it. If you want a daily dose (well, almost daily dose) of ECAR factoids, follow me on Twitter @DataDeeva or explore #ECAR.

 

-Eden

 

Eden Dahlstrom  Director of Research

Data, Research, and Analytics
EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
1150 18th Street, NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036
direct: 303.939.0330 | mobile: 530.903.2305 | educause.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Staples, Mark
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are investigating the notion of federating student accounts so that we can get out of the authentication business and extend our ability to authorize all of our stakeholders into appropriate services. Most, if not all, students have a personal email address that they have had, and will more than likely continue to have, for a long time. In my discussions with them at my last three institutions, they only use their institutional email because they have to and if they are permitted to forward it to their personal account, they generally do. By federating, this satisfies the issue with intellectual content as it stays with their personal account and it also satisfies Alumni/Advancement as the same account that came with them, leaves with them—providing a means for future communication.

 

I don't believe that we can adequately sustain keeping email accounts perpetually and they remain useful. This will mean that the average person will have at least three email accounts, one from their employer, their personal, and their institutional account. What happens if they go to grad school at another institution? What if they pursue a terminal degree at yet a third institution?

 

Also, eventually, the usernames will become difficult to remember because the standard algorithms won't work. Folks, when asked, prefer to have ONE identity, if possible.

 

Mark

______________________________________________

Mark Staples

Vice President & Chief Information Officer

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Division of Technology Services

 

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115

Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184

email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio

______________________________________________

 

"It's not my job to have all the answers, but it is my job to ask lots of penetrating, disturbing, and occasionally almost offensive questions as part of the analytic process that leads to insight and refinement." -Gary Loveman

 

From: <Matthews>, Rick <matthews@WFU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:12 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

 

Rick


--

Wake Forest University

htp://users.wfu.edu/matthews

 

Eden,

Thank you for this information. The ECAR data are consistent with my impression of how students want information from the college and from their instructors. Again, the challenge for most of them is managing multiple accounts. While, some have figured out that most email clients support multiple accounts, many access their email from a web browser. Providing students with multiple ways to access communications from the LMS and from their instructors is yet another challenge for all of us.

Mark

______________________________________________
Mark Staples
Vice President & Chief Information Officer
Wentworth Institute of Technology
Division of Technology Services

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115
Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184
email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio
LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/markallenstaples
blog: http://blogs.wit.edu/cio
http://www.wit.edu

______________________________________________

"Those who turn good (organizations) into great (organizations) are motivated by a deep creative urge and an inner compulsion for sheer unadulterated excellence for its own sake." - Jim Collins, author of "Good to Great"

From: Eden Dahlstrom <edahlstrom@EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 2:23 PM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

Hi All,

 

This is a bit of a tangent to the actual question posted by Andy @Baker U, but since the 9.27.13 NYT article about technology and the college generation was noted in the listserv conversation, I want to offer a few relevant factoids from the annual ECAR Student Tech Survey about students and e-mail use: http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013.

 

Based on ECAR research, we know:

·         The majority of undergrads (66%) want their instructors to use e-mail MORE

·         For the past three years, e-mail has consistently appeared at/near the top of the “use it more” wish list for students (with regard to communicating with their instructors)

·         A deeper dive with undergrad student focus groups told us that students like e-mail because it is asynchronous and highly documentable. Students like to use e-mail to communicate with their instructors over other options because they have a record of the convo. They recognize the value of having a digital trail of submitting assignments, or documenting extensions/changes/exceptions in an e-mail string. These e-mail strings can originate at 3 AM from the student-side and not be disruptive to the instructor, and that’s where the value of an asynchronous option comes into play.

 

I’m not surprised to hear that students spend only 6-minutes a day checking e-mail – they have so many other communication options to “keep connected” so this quantity of time makes sense. But, it is important to recognize that e-mail still serves a purpose in the lives of undergrads. Especially for the student-to-instructor relationship. We’ll investigate how faculty perceive this in the 2014 ECAR faculty study work (right now our story is one-sided, with just undergrads’ experiences captured).

 

ECAR will also investigate students’ daily digital habits (to a greater extent than we have in the past) in the 2014 ECAR student study work to gain more insight about if/how/in what context students expect or prefer to keep connected with one another, their instructors, and their institution. Here is the graphic of how the “use it more/use it less” communication modes was presented in the 2013 ECAR report – more context if offered in the accompanying report text (not re-printed here).

 

If you want your institution to participate in the 2014 student study or the 2014 faculty study, more info can be found at: http://www.educause.edu/ecar/about-ecar/ecar-annual-study-students-and-it/participate-ecar-study-students-and-it. If you want a daily dose (well, almost daily dose) of ECAR factoids, follow me on Twitter @DataDeeva or explore #ECAR.

 

-Eden

 

Eden Dahlstrom  Director of Research

Data, Research, and Analytics
EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
1150 18th Street, NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036
direct: 303.939.0330 | mobile: 530.903.2305 | educause.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Staples, Mark
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are investigating the notion of federating student accounts so that we can get out of the authentication business and extend our ability to authorize all of our stakeholders into appropriate services. Most, if not all, students have a personal email address that they have had, and will more than likely continue to have, for a long time. In my discussions with them at my last three institutions, they only use their institutional email because they have to and if they are permitted to forward it to their personal account, they generally do. By federating, this satisfies the issue with intellectual content as it stays with their personal account and it also satisfies Alumni/Advancement as the same account that came with them, leaves with them—providing a means for future communication.

 

I don't believe that we can adequately sustain keeping email accounts perpetually and they remain useful. This will mean that the average person will have at least three email accounts, one from their employer, their personal, and their institutional account. What happens if they go to grad school at another institution? What if they pursue a terminal degree at yet a third institution?

 

Also, eventually, the usernames will become difficult to remember because the standard algorithms won't work. Folks, when asked, prefer to have ONE identity, if possible.

 

Mark

______________________________________________

Mark Staples

Vice President & Chief Information Officer

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Division of Technology Services

 

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115

Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184

email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio

______________________________________________

 

"It's not my job to have all the answers, but it is my job to ask lots of penetrating, disturbing, and occasionally almost offensive questions as part of the analytic process that leads to insight and refinement." -Gary Loveman

 

From: <Matthews>, Rick <matthews@WFU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:12 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

 

Rick


--

Wake Forest University

htp://users.wfu.edu/matthews

 

Interesting information and conversation.  In my mind, however, the question isn’t so much whether students use or should use email, but who provides that email?!  I am firmly in the camp that since emails are now readily available for free, and many services require you to have a functioning email to sign up for X or Y, that many/most students have at least 1 (and more likely 3 or more) emails before they even come to College.  Why in the world, in this day and age, would someone want to be forced to take on another one?!  Instead, I believe we should be focusing on capturing a student’s preferred email, and just using that one for our institutional communications to them.  (If they don’t provide / maintain a legitimate email, we could automate the use of “holds” on their account until they do.  We do this sort of thing for other reasons – why not this one too?)  I don’t believe any newer technology has fully replaced email yet.  It is still  needed.  The main question, however, is why does an institution feel the need to generate a new email address anymore for a student who likely has at least one already, and can quickly, easily, and at no cost get one within minutes at any time?!

 

Now, if I could only get my institution to stop providing emails to students, I would be ecstatic.  J

 

Thanks,

 

Randall S. Jobski, PMP

Director - Enterprise Systems

Lansing Community College

ITIL v3 Foundational Certified

jobskir@lcc.edu

517-483-1760 (w)

517-582-5003 (c)

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Eden Dahlstrom
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 2:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: University issued email addresses

 

Hi All,

 

This is a bit of a tangent to the actual question posted by Andy @Baker U, but since the 9.27.13 NYT article about technology and the college generation was noted in the listserv conversation, I want to offer a few relevant factoids from the annual ECAR Student Tech Survey about students and e-mail use: http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013.

 

Based on ECAR research, we know:

·         The majority of undergrads (66%) want their instructors to use e-mail MORE

·         For the past three years, e-mail has consistently appeared at/near the top of the “use it more” wish list for students (with regard to communicating with their instructors)

·         A deeper dive with undergrad student focus groups told us that students like e-mail because it is asynchronous and highly documentable. Students like to use e-mail to communicate with their instructors over other options because they have a record of the convo. They recognize the value of having a digital trail of submitting assignments, or documenting extensions/changes/exceptions in an e-mail string. These e-mail strings can originate at 3 AM from the student-side and not be disruptive to the instructor, and that’s where the value of an asynchronous option comes into play.

 

I’m not surprised to hear that students spend only 6-minutes a day checking e-mail – they have so many other communication options to “keep connected” so this quantity of time makes sense. But, it is important to recognize that e-mail still serves a purpose in the lives of undergrads. Especially for the student-to-instructor relationship. We’ll investigate how faculty perceive this in the 2014 ECAR faculty study work (right now our story is one-sided, with just undergrads’ experiences captured).

 

ECAR will also investigate students’ daily digital habits (to a greater extent than we have in the past) in the 2014 ECAR student study work to gain more insight about if/how/in what context students expect or prefer to keep connected with one another, their instructors, and their institution. Here is the graphic of how the “use it more/use it less” communication modes was presented in the 2013 ECAR report – more context if offered in the accompanying report text (not re-printed here).

 

If you want your institution to participate in the 2014 student study or the 2014 faculty study, more info can be found at: http://www.educause.edu/ecar/about-ecar/ecar-annual-study-students-and-it/participate-ecar-study-students-and-it. If you want a daily dose (well, almost daily dose) of ECAR factoids, follow me on Twitter @DataDeeva or explore #ECAR.

 

-Eden

 

Eden Dahlstrom  Director of Research

Data, Research, and Analytics
EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
1150 18th Street, NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036
direct: 303.939.0330 | mobile: 530.903.2305 | educause.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Staples, Mark
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are investigating the notion of federating student accounts so that we can get out of the authentication business and extend our ability to authorize all of our stakeholders into appropriate services. Most, if not all, students have a personal email address that they have had, and will more than likely continue to have, for a long time. In my discussions with them at my last three institutions, they only use their institutional email because they have to and if they are permitted to forward it to their personal account, they generally do. By federating, this satisfies the issue with intellectual content as it stays with their personal account and it also satisfies Alumni/Advancement as the same account that came with them, leaves with them—providing a means for future communication.

 

I don't believe that we can adequately sustain keeping email accounts perpetually and they remain useful. This will mean that the average person will have at least three email accounts, one from their employer, their personal, and their institutional account. What happens if they go to grad school at another institution? What if they pursue a terminal degree at yet a third institution?

 

Also, eventually, the usernames will become difficult to remember because the standard algorithms won't work. Folks, when asked, prefer to have ONE identity, if possible.

 

Mark

______________________________________________

Mark Staples

Vice President & Chief Information Officer

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Division of Technology Services

 

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115

Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184

email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio

______________________________________________

 

"It's not my job to have all the answers, but it is my job to ask lots of penetrating, disturbing, and occasionally almost offensive questions as part of the analytic process that leads to insight and refinement." -Gary Loveman

 

From: <Matthews>, Rick <matthews@WFU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:12 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

 

Rick


--

Wake Forest University

htp://users.wfu.edu/matthews

 

Hi all,

 

To add to the EDUCAUSE data on the topic, in 2012, only 2% of respondents told us that they do not offer student e-mail.  Of the 98% that do, only 1% said they were planning to stop offering e-mail to students. Considering that we had 778 institutions responded to CDS 2012, there seem to be only a few schools not offering e-mail addresses to students.

 

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Randy Jobski
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 12:48 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

Interesting information and conversation.  In my mind, however, the question isn’t so much whether students use or should use email, but who provides that email?!  I am firmly in the camp that since emails are now readily available for free, and many services require you to have a functioning email to sign up for X or Y, that many/most students have at least 1 (and more likely 3 or more) emails before they even come to College.  Why in the world, in this day and age, would someone want to be forced to take on another one?!  Instead, I believe we should be focusing on capturing a student’s preferred email, and just using that one for our institutional communications to them.  (If they don’t provide / maintain a legitimate email, we could automate the use of “holds” on their account until they do.  We do this sort of thing for other reasons – why not this one too?)  I don’t believe any newer technology has fully replaced email yet.  It is still  needed.  The main question, however, is why does an institution feel the need to generate a new email address anymore for a student who likely has at least one already, and can quickly, easily, and at no cost get one within minutes at any time?!

 

Now, if I could only get my institution to stop providing emails to students, I would be ecstatic.  J

 

Thanks,

 

Randall S. Jobski, PMP

Director - Enterprise Systems

Lansing Community College

ITIL v3 Foundational Certified

jobskir@lcc.edu

517-483-1760 (w)

517-582-5003 (c)

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Eden Dahlstrom
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 2:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: University issued email addresses

 

Hi All,

 

This is a bit of a tangent to the actual question posted by Andy @Baker U, but since the 9.27.13 NYT article about technology and the college generation was noted in the listserv conversation, I want to offer a few relevant factoids from the annual ECAR Student Tech Survey about students and e-mail use: http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/ecar-study-undergraduate-students-and-information-technology-2013.

 

Based on ECAR research, we know:

·        The majority of undergrads (66%) want their instructors to use e-mail MORE

·        For the past three years, e-mail has consistently appeared at/near the top of the “use it more” wish list for students (with regard to communicating with their instructors)

·        A deeper dive with undergrad student focus groups told us that students like e-mail because it is asynchronous and highly documentable. Students like to use e-mail to communicate with their instructors over other options because they have a record of the convo. They recognize the value of having a digital trail of submitting assignments, or documenting extensions/changes/exceptions in an e-mail string. These e-mail strings can originate at 3 AM from the student-side and not be disruptive to the instructor, and that’s where the value of an asynchronous option comes into play.

 

I’m not surprised to hear that students spend only 6-minutes a day checking e-mail – they have so many other communication options to “keep connected” so this quantity of time makes sense. But, it is important to recognize that e-mail still serves a purpose in the lives of undergrads. Especially for the student-to-instructor relationship. We’ll investigate how faculty perceive this in the 2014 ECAR faculty study work (right now our story is one-sided, with just undergrads’ experiences captured).

 

ECAR will also investigate students’ daily digital habits (to a greater extent than we have in the past) in the 2014 ECAR student study work to gain more insight about if/how/in what context students expect or prefer to keep connected with one another, their instructors, and their institution. Here is the graphic of how the “use it more/use it less” communication modes was presented in the 2013 ECAR report – more context if offered in the accompanying report text (not re-printed here).

 

If you want your institution to participate in the 2014 student study or the 2014 faculty study, more info can be found at: http://www.educause.edu/ecar/about-ecar/ecar-annual-study-students-and-it/participate-ecar-study-students-and-it. If you want a daily dose (well, almost daily dose) of ECAR factoids, follow me on Twitter @DataDeeva or explore #ECAR.

 

-Eden

 

Eden Dahlstrom  Director of Research

Data, Research, and Analytics
EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
1150 18th Street, NW, Suite 900 Washington, DC 20036
direct: 303.939.0330 | mobile: 530.903.2305 | educause.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Staples, Mark
Sent: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are investigating the notion of federating student accounts so that we can get out of the authentication business and extend our ability to authorize all of our stakeholders into appropriate services. Most, if not all, students have a personal email address that they have had, and will more than likely continue to have, for a long time. In my discussions with them at my last three institutions, they only use their institutional email because they have to and if they are permitted to forward it to their personal account, they generally do. By federating, this satisfies the issue with intellectual content as it stays with their personal account and it also satisfies Alumni/Advancement as the same account that came with them, leaves with them—providing a means for future communication.

 

I don't believe that we can adequately sustain keeping email accounts perpetually and they remain useful. This will mean that the average person will have at least three email accounts, one from their employer, their personal, and their institutional account. What happens if they go to grad school at another institution? What if they pursue a terminal degree at yet a third institution?

 

Also, eventually, the usernames will become difficult to remember because the standard algorithms won't work. Folks, when asked, prefer to have ONE identity, if possible.

 

Mark

______________________________________________

Mark Staples

Vice President & Chief Information Officer

Wentworth Institute of Technology

Division of Technology Services

 

Williston Hall | 550 Huntington Avenue | Boston, Ma 02115

Office Phone: 617-989-4592 | Mobile: 617-543-4184

email: staplesm@wit.edu | Twitter: markstaples_cio

______________________________________________

 

"It's not my job to have all the answers, but it is my job to ask lots of penetrating, disturbing, and occasionally almost offensive questions as part of the analytic process that leads to insight and refinement." -Gary Loveman

 

From: <Matthews>, Rick <matthews@WFU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, September 30, 2013 10:12 AM
To: "CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] University issued email addresses

 

We are actually heading in the opposite direction, and will be extending email accounts to alumni. But the context is important: we migrated to Google Mail, and with it the full suite of Google Apps for Education. Since then, our graduating seniors have demanded to retain their Google accounts. So much of their life and intellectual product exists in email, in Google Docs, Google Sites, Drive, etc. Students report that almost every group project, whether for a class or for a student organization, starts with a shared Google Doc.

In parallel, our Advancement office has become absolutely dependent on the collaborative power of Google Apps, and they want to harness that power in working with various alumni groups, committees, event task forces, etc. So they, too, are asking that graduates keep their accounts and that accounts be provisioned for all alumni who ask for them.

For us, the various Google Apps are powerful productivity tools, and would be even if email were not part of the suite.  It is not just about email; it is an ecosystem. 

 

As for the phenomenon noted in the NY Times article of students not checking email, that is not happening here, at least beyond the small number of students who are being academically irresponsible in multiple ways. Email to university accounts is our official and primary means of communication. Further, students who do not monitor their Google Mail will not get alerts to what is happening with their collaborative Google Docs.

 

Rick


--

Wake Forest University

htp://users.wfu.edu/matthews

 

Andy

We stopped issuing undergraduate student email addresses a few years ago.  We came to the conclusion that we did not have to control how they read their email.  It is equivalent to forcing them to use a particular post office mailbox for traditional mail.  Asking them where they preferred to have their paper mail sent has worked for us since 1802 so we believed that it would work for email.  The proof is in the results.  Since we stopped issuing university addresses and asking them for their preferred email address, communication effectiveness improved. 

….Perry

 

Perry M. Sisk

Senior Director, Information Technology Systems and Support

Saint Mary’s University

Halifax, Nova Scotia

(902) 420-5474

 

 

Perry, A process question. As with most of us, if we get an application that does not provide a mailing address, we don’t process the application until we get one. Does Saint Mary’s have a similar rule for email addresses?  If one is not provided, the process stops until you get one. That has always been one of our main reasons for giving students an @pct.edu domain email account. So we know every student has at least one email account. We also did some small focus group surveys of students who told us that did not want to have the college use their personal email accounts for college business. They wanted to keep their personal email personal and their college email for college. Just like many employees have work email and personal email and keep the two separate.

 

 

Mike Cunningham

VP for Information Technology Services/CIO

Pennsylvania College of Technology

www.pct.edu

 

 

 

All, This has been a most compelling discussion, in fact it has moved me form what I thought was very firm ground regarding college owned email addresses. The one question that I am still wrestling with is how those of you that do not assign an address deal with authentication. At Bellevue College we have worked very hard to establish a NetID (their email address) as their single form of authentication. This seems to be the way that Google and Microsoft have moved as well. Your discussion has moved me to reconsider the policy we have towards college email but how do you authenticate your students to the services you provide them? Thank you Russ Beard VP for Information Resources Bellevue College Bellevue WA ________________________________________
We run a daily process that uses data in Colleague to identify students that enrolled since the last time the daily process completed.  It creates a record for them in LDAP and assigns them a username with their first initial concatenated with last name.  The LDAP record drives authentication for all online services we provide except for Moodle, which we manage through a daily import of a CSV file. 
 
Last month, we completed a conversion of all computer labs into traditional classrooms and replaced the desktop lab PC's with mobile thin clients that use AD for authentication.  This is our foundation for moving everything from LDAP to AD and sets us up for the next big project that requires AD; migrating from GroupWise to Exchange.  How to migrate and to which flavor of Exchange we use has yet to be determined, but I'm sure avoiding it is the most effective strategy for determining our best option.
 
 
 
 
Scott Ciliberti
Chief Information Officer, IT Services
Golden Gate University
(415) 369-5365
 
 
>>>
Russ, Of course, an Email address is not a pre-requisite for a username. The trick is in the transition from using an Email address as a login to a standard user name. We are planning the abolishment of student email and are in the same situation where we have to migrate from one to the other. As a result, we are keeping the email address stored within LDAP/AD as the username for current students, and changing our algorithm for account creation to a non-email address for incoming students. During this process, there is no requirement to keep an actual email account. Tim Timothy A. Pierson Associate VP, Information Technology and CIO Piedmont Technical College Lex Walters Campus 620 N. Emerald Rd. | P.O. Box 1467 Greenwood, SC 29648 Pierson.t@ptc.edu Phone: 864.941.8437 Mobie: 864.992.6741 CISSP, CCNA:Security, MCSE: Security "It is not the critic who counts; the credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena. Who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short time and time again; and who, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly. His place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." - Theodore Roosevelt
<7BC031982C5CF447A72E0A67A6EA767158E69AEB@SMU-MBX2.SMUNET.SMU.CA>,<25D963503525B546BE01B1C8B4BC0D4A2BC62702@EXCH-MBX4.pct.edu> <0AA6FCCB42F4AE4DB7AD95068C3115B31446650C@WILLOW.bellevuecollege.edu> X-Mailer: Oracle Connector for Outlook 10.1.3.0.11 110130 (12.0.6562) X-Accept-Language: en-us, en MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Russ, we too generate a unique LCC Banner TUID (as we call it) for a person= and we don't use email as their ID (but we also still provide our students= with a school email - as previously noted in this discussion). But, that = being said, a legitimate email address (by definition) has to be unique. T= hat is why you can sign up for a Google account with any legitimate email a= ddress you own. So, following this logic, you should be able to accept a l= egitimate email address - any email address - your student owns as their un= ique ID. Like Google, you would need to have the person log into their ema= il address and clink a link found in an email your institution sends to the= m to confirm they actually own the email address they are trying to sign up= under. Just a thought. Thanks, Randall S. Jobski, PMP Director - Enterprise Systems Lansing Community College ITIL v3 Foundational Certified jobskir@lcc.edu 517-483-1760 (w) 517-582-5003 (c)
We started a project about a year ago to do the same thing that HMC is doing around decoupling the account from all services. 

What we are doing is moving to a portal only account -- it allows you to get into our portal and participate in groups and share content but you aren't provisioned for the LMS, email, administrative system, files, etc.

You could be provisioned into other services based upon various criteria (role, affiliation, self-service indicators, etc.). We think this kind of flexible structure will be easier to support and more user friendly.

It also allows us to more easily de-couple services from our infrastructure and rethink how we deploy those services. 

I will say, this approach is complicated -- there are lots of inter-dependencies that build up over the years but it is a great exercise to think through how you manage and provision services.

jack


Jack Suess             UMBC VP of IT & CIO
jack@umbc.edu     1000 Hilltop Circle
410.455.2582          Baltimore Md, 21250
Homepage:             http://bit.ly/fSB5ID



Davenport spends significant effort getting students to collaborate within Google Docs. In our case at least, a prerequisite for that collaboration is a Gmail account on our mail domain.  Rather than hope everyone has a personal @gmail.com account, giving out Google accounts within our own mail domain has been a way to make it easier to get students collaborating within Google Docs (plus having a full student directory in Google makes it possible to share docs without knowing someone's email address).

To borrow the snail-mail address analogy that has appeared in several comments here, I would compare our method to a school issuing PO Boxes for their undergraduates (something my school did when I was an undergrad).

I think this brings up an interesting potential angle for Google/Microsoft.  Would they be willing to encourage widespread enterprise deployments of their collaboration apps without also providing email accounts?  Right now, a full deployment of Google Apps starts with Gmail and that's probably the only reason Davenport hasn't looked at ending our long-standing practice of providing student emails.  Without those accounts, we lose the valuable collaboration platform we have in place. 

This has been a great discussion.  Thanks everyone for posting!

Brian Miller
V.P. Information Technology Services & CIO
Davenport University
6191 Kraft Ave. SE / Broadmoor Suite 270
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
p. 616.732.1195 | c. 616-821-2618
brian.miller@davenport.edu

Follow us on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/davenportuit
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