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Hi,
In reading the campus newsletter this morning, I see that our department of Music, Theater and Dance is running a summer music camp.  The description reads:
"Musicians aged 12-18 will use the university's music computer lab to create compositions that they can continue to work on at home."

These computers have Internet connections, but it is not clear to me that the Internet is any part of the instruction.  A quick web search shows that several universities have policies that state that minors cannot use computer in university libraries unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.  I couldn't find a similar policy for computer labs.

Do you have such a policy?
Do you have a procedure for authorizing events in labs that have minors as the intended audience?

Thanks much in advance for your advice.

--
Theresa Rowe
Chief Information Officer
Oakland University
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We have no such policy or procedure and we do now have events where minors attend (primarily sports camps using Wi-Fi in our dorms, but possibly in the library labs as well).

Please keep us apprised of how this goes for you.
Thanks,
Brian

Brian Miller
V.P. Information Technology Services & CIO
Davenport University
6191 Kraft Ave. SE / Broadmoor Suite 270
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
p. 616.732.1195 | c. 616-821-2618
brian.miller@davenport.edu






There is a interesting program called Rock Our World (rockourworld.org) you may look at for you music department. Sent from my iPad
Message from bauer.rick@gmail.com

As a CIO at a boarding school, I also ran the summer programs for the school, which had a variety of educational, arts, and athletics activities. We had between 400-700 students from age 10-adult per week, for about 10 weeks. A part of the orientation process was parental sign-off (where appropriate; adults and counselors signed themselves) on acceptable use policies for school internet use (in the context of other behavioral expectations), and their awareness that our internet service was unfiltered. Violations (very few) ranged from loss of privilege to dismissal in one egregious case. The mini-AUP/behavior sign-off was a good way of dealing with any problems up front.

Rick Bauer, CompTIA
former CIO @ The Hill School


On , Theresa Rowe <rowe@oakland.edu> wrote:
> Hi,
> In reading the campus newsletter this morning, I see that our department of Music, Theater and Dance is running a summer music camp.  The description reads:
> "Musicians aged 12-18 will use the university's music computer lab to
> create compositions that they can continue to work on at home."
>
> These computers have Internet connections, but it is not clear to me that the Internet is any part of the instruction.  A quick web search shows that several universities have policies that state that minors cannot use computer in university libraries unless accompanied by a parent or guardian.  I couldn't find a similar policy for computer labs.
>
>
> Do you have such a policy?
> Do you have a procedure for authorizing events in labs that have minors as the intended audience?
>
> Thanks much in advance for your advice.
> --
> Theresa Rowe
>
> Chief Information Officer
> Oakland University
>
>  
>
> **********
> Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
>
>
> ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Sorry I’m late to this discussion… been out of the office…

 

I’m puzzled: both of my sons were minors when they enrolled as freshmen… I suspect most institutions have minors as regular students. Why are short-term minors different from long-term minors…

 

Ron

 

Ronald Vyhmeister, PhD

rvyhmeister@aiias.edu

Professor, Department of Business

Director, PhD in Business

Director of Advancement and Recruitment

AIIAS

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