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Good morning!

 

I’m not sure how this topic has arisen again, but, I concur with Steve!

 

Although I’ve not been on the list as long as some, during the years I have been subscribed, there have been only a small handful of times in which “marketing” has been a nuisance. In return for these moments, we have created a win-win scenario. For us, we often times receive insights from a larger community regarding what is taking place outside our walls. For the vendor, they have an expanded opportunity to learn about the current issues, thoughts, and actions that are at the forefront of the modern college/university. Since we do use consultants, software, and other services to supplement our environments, I cannot see how this latter fact is a bad thing.   

 

Since Steve is much smarter than me, I guess this is my penny’s worth on the topic.

 

Best regards,

Art

 

Arthur J. Fridrich

Technology Services

Virginia State University

1 Hayden Drive

Petersburg, VA 23806

Tel.: (804) 524-3194

Email: afridrich@vsu.edu

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/pub/arthur-fridrich/3/9a6/502

 

 

 

Comments

Message from michael.zastudil@blackboard.com

As a vendor, I follow discussions to become a better consultant to my clients and share best practices as I learn them. I am not in a sales role and I would never consider using this as a forum to sell or market services. There have been vendors who have, but from what I have seen they are typically harmless. I only offer my experience if it would add to the discussion. I frequently find that as a vendor handling many different scenarios and situations I can provide insights and suggestions that would help my clients and further my goal to be a trusted advisor with the client’s best interests at heart.

 

Regards,

 

Michael Zastudil

Operational Account Manager, Bb Student Services

 

////////////////////////////////////////////////////

 

Blackboard Inc.

12012 Sunset Hills Road

Reston, VA 20190-5870

 

C / 703.909.1209

michael.zastudil@blackboard.com

 

I think it depends on the level of vendor participant.  A high level participant, who has ear of decision makers in product development or a technical support manager, sounds real useful.  After all, the EDU members are CIOs.  I'm not sure about something less. 

Keith Nelson
Chief Technology Officer
Alma College

Email:  nelsonkr@alma.edu
Office:  989/463-7275
Cell:  989/292-5300
Fax:  989/463-7101

Message from bauer.rick@gmail.com

As a former CIO turned somewhat to the Dark Side (a nonprofit trade association building vendor-neutral certifications), I see this listserve as a valuable set of insights about the challenges of doing IT on shoestring budgets, with megatrends like consumerization, BYOD, cloud, and analytics almost owing their existence in corporate IT to this very college technology environment that many of you struggle to guide, manage, and keep from blowing up.

I also find many opportunities to recruit subject matter experts to help build these vendor-neutral certifications, because I don't see an unwillingness to engage offline if an opportunity is out there. I find great common cause on the issue of training and the human capital development of staff IT in this group, and it helps us to provide the right solutions to our customers--both academic and private sector IT professionals and the people who hire them.

If you compare this with the average LinkedIn group for just about anything, I find the signal-to-noise ratio quite high, and the exceptions quite rare.

thanks for your understanding, technology leaders.

Rick Bauer
Director of R&D
CompTIA

On , Michael Zastudil <Michael.Zastudil@blackboard.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> As a vendor, I follow discussions to become a better consultant to my clients and share best practices as I learn them. I am not in a sales role and I would never consider using this as a forum to sell or market
> services. There have been vendors who have, but from what I have seen they are typically harmless. I only offer my experience if it would add to the discussion. I frequently find that as a vendor handling many different scenarios and situations I can provide
> insights and suggestions that would help my clients and further my goal to be a trusted advisor with the client’s best interests at heart.
>  
>
> Regards,
>  
> Michael Zastudil
> Operational Account Manager, Bb Student Services
>  
> ////////////////////////////////////////////////////
>  
> Blackboard Inc.
> 12012 Sunset Hills Road
> Reston, VA 20190-5870
>  
> C
> / 703.909.1209
> michael.zastudil@blackboard.com
>
>
>  
>
>
>
I literally just got off a cold call from a company looking to "align my applications portfolio with business objectives." I will not name the company, but it is much easier to click the delete button to trash a solicitation on the CIO listserv from my email than it is to hang up on a hungry sales rep (with a scripted answer to my every response)--without being rude. Maybe one benefit of vendors watching the CIO list is, they will learn how much we hate cold calls, no matter what the medium. || |||| ||| || | | || ||| || ||| || | | ||| || ||| || Patrick Masson Chief Technology Officer, UMassOnline The University of Massachusetts, Office of the President 333 South St., Suite 400, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (774) 455-7615: Office (774) 455-7620: Fax (970) 4MASSON: GoogleVoice UMOLPatMasson: AIM massonpj: Skype Web Site: http://www.umassonline.net Blog: http://www.umassonlineblog.com ________________________________________
I have to agree with Patrick. I would be perfectly happy to take cold sales calls if the vendors who make them could make short pitch (less than one minute), give me a response to respond, and politely go away if I say that I am not interested. Since this does not seem to be the norm, the only alternatives for busy CIOs and other staff members is to either not take the calls at all (difficult) or to be rude. Although I consider the cold caller's assumption that they have a right to my time on their schedule to be rude in the first place. That being said, I can accept vendors on this list. We all know that they are there. When they choose to participate instead of just lurking, they often have something useful to say and contribute much to the discussion. When the few choose to violate the rules and use the list for solicitation, EDUCUASE does a good job of policing it. As Patrick says, it is a lot easier to click delete than to make a cold sale caller go away. --Randy Charles R. Williams Chief Information Officer Benedictine University 5700 College Road Lisle, IL  60532 630-829-6025
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can "go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!" Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is..... As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can tell you about their competitors :), but I am afraid that the challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to generate sales. Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers (business models, product development, R&D, etc.) if we can get the right group engaged from the vendor side. Hossein Shahrokhi CIO, University of Houston-Downtown
Message from dthibeau@post03.curry.edu

Can you imagine a world where vendors only sent information to a list (not this one, but one dedicated to technology based products)? We’d eliminate all that spam and all the calls!  If we wanted to research something, a simple search of a list’s archives could give us all we want.  I can dream…

 

Dennis

 

 
My favorite opening line is "this is not a sales call, we're just reaching out to you".  Please.
 
I do like the idea of allowing vendors to monitor this list.  They can see first hand what our immediate and future challenges and issues are.  This list provides them better insight to hopefully provide us solutions as they develop or enhance their products. 
 
I think some of the vendors that have used this list to generate sales may not have been aware of what this list is intended for.  They are quickly addressed (thank you moderators) and not heard from again.
 
My two cents.
 
Kevin G. Sebolt
Director, Office of Information Technology
Franciscan University of Steubenville
1235 University Blvd. Steubenville, Ohio 43952-1763
Phone:  740-284-5192
Fax:      740-284-7228
www.franciscan.edu
 
 
 


>>> "Shahrokhi, Hossein" <ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU> 8/9/2012 12:54 PM >>>
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first
name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can
"go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!"


Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is.....

As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and
informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can
tell you about their competitors :),  but  I am afraid that the
challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with
commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to
generate sales.

Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use
this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication
channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers
(business models, product development, R&D,  etc.) if we can get the
right group engaged from the vendor side.


Hossein Shahrokhi
CIO,  University of Houston-Downtown

Hey, that's the same guy: called out of blue and asked, "Hey Pat, I'd like to schedule about an hour to go over the technology projects that the university is working on!"" || |||| ||| || | | || ||| || ||| || | | ||| || ||| || Patrick Masson Chief Technology Officer, UMassOnline The University of Massachusetts, Office of the President 333 South St., Suite 400, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (774) 455-7615: Office (774) 455-7620: Fax (970) 4MASSON: GoogleVoice UMOLPatMasson: AIM massonpj: Skype Web Site: http://www.umassonline.net Blog: http://www.umassonlineblog.com ________________________________________ From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Shahrokhi, Hossein [ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU] Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 12:54 PM To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can "go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!" Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is..... As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can tell you about their competitors :), but I am afraid that the challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to generate sales. Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers (business models, product development, R&D, etc.) if we can get the right group engaged from the vendor side. Hossein Shahrokhi CIO, University of Houston-Downtown

I had to weigh in on two comments:

 

“Maybe one benefit of vendors watching the CIO list is, they will learn how much we hate cold calls, no matter what the medium”

 

-       Believe me, the person calling hates it much more than you do… 

 

“Can you imagine a world where vendors only sent information to a list (not this one, but one dedicated to technology based products)”

 

-       It’s called their web site – but really – how often do you just go out looking for technology or product information?  Pull communications is terribly ineffective for the vendor. 

 

As a consultant, I get the same calls and offers – and my response is “until I have a need, I’m not interested in your information”  But the key here is “I have a need”  When people ask questions and look for advice – they are saying “I now have a need”

 

I support the consensus that a list like this isn’t to be used for general marketing – but if you are facing an issue important enough to reach out to a list in the true hope for help – then logic would lead me to believe you want to hear from someone with a solution.  In all my years, I have yet to see anyone volunteer to make a poster’s issue their #1 priority, drop what they are doing, and solve it for free.  When that becomes the norm, those pesky cold calls will stop.


-- 
 
Ron Walczak    PMP, RCDD, CWNA/CWSP
Walczak Technology Consultants, Inc
(724) 865-2740

"Worry looks around; sorry looks back; faith looks up; virtue looks forward" - Unknown

"Not to speak is to speak.  Not to act is to act." -  Dietrich Bonhoeffer 

"The great aim of education is not knowledge but action." - Herbert Spencer

Anyone can count the seeds in an apple; 
but only God can count the apples in a seed

As  a  long time member of this list but no longer a CIO within Higher Ed (semi-retired but doing a bit of teaching and consulting), I'd like to continue to monitor the activities of those CIOs now in the trenches.   I enjoy seeing history repeat itself, although the technology may have changed, the IT leadership challenges within Higher Education remain the same.   So I vote to at least "grandfather" former HE CIOs, even if they have gone over to the "other side".  

Thanks.

fjm
Frank J. Monaco
Former CIO, Pace University, NY 1997-2008
Former Director of Information Management, United States Military Academy at West Point, 1993-1997   


From: Kevin Sebolt <ksebolt@FRANCISCAN.EDU>
Reply-To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 13:34:58 -0400
To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation

 
My favorite opening line is "this is not a sales call, we're just reaching out to you".  Please.
 
I do like the idea of allowing vendors to monitor this list.  They can see first hand what our immediate and future challenges and issues are.  This list provides them better insight to hopefully provide us solutions as they develop or enhance their products. 
 
I think some of the vendors that have used this list to generate sales may not have been aware of what this list is intended for.  They are quickly addressed (thank you moderators) and not heard from again.
 
My two cents.
 
Kevin G. Sebolt
Director, Office of Information Technology
Franciscan University of Steubenville
1235 University Blvd. Steubenville, Ohio 43952-1763
Phone:  740-284-5192
Fax:      740-284-7228
www.franciscan.edu
 
 
 


>>> "Shahrokhi, Hossein" <ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU> 8/9/2012 12:54 PM >>>
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first
name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can
"go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!"


Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is.....

As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and
informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can
tell you about their competitors :),  but  I am afraid that the
challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with
commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to
generate sales.

Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use
this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication
channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers
(business models, product development, R&D,  etc.) if we can get the
right group engaged from the vendor side.


Hossein Shahrokhi
CIO,  University of Houston-Downtown

On that note I am not and never have been a HE CIO (was AVP) and have been out of HE two years after over 15 years in IT roles of progressive leadership.  But I still see HE CIO as a possible future role for me and therefore I maintain membership on this list to keep up with trends and occasionally lend my fraction of a dollar.

Greg

On Aug 9, 2012 1:33 PM, "Frank J. Monaco" <frank.j.monaco@gmail.com> wrote:
As  a  long time member of this list but no longer a CIO within Higher Ed (semi-retired but doing a bit of teaching and consulting), I'd like to continue to monitor the activities of those CIOs now in the trenches.   I enjoy seeing history repeat itself, although the technology may have changed, the IT leadership challenges within Higher Education remain the same.   So I vote to at least "grandfather" former HE CIOs, even if they have gone over to the "other side".  

Thanks.

fjm
Frank J. Monaco
Former CIO, Pace University, NY 1997-2008
Former Director of Information Management, United States Military Academy at West Point, 1993-1997   


From: Kevin Sebolt <ksebolt@FRANCISCAN.EDU>
Reply-To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 13:34:58 -0400
To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation

 
My favorite opening line is "this is not a sales call, we're just reaching out to you".  Please.
 
I do like the idea of allowing vendors to monitor this list.  They can see first hand what our immediate and future challenges and issues are.  This list provides them better insight to hopefully provide us solutions as they develop or enhance their products. 
 
I think some of the vendors that have used this list to generate sales may not have been aware of what this list is intended for.  They are quickly addressed (thank you moderators) and not heard from again.
 
My two cents.
 
Kevin G. Sebolt
Director, Office of Information Technology
Franciscan University of Steubenville
1235 University Blvd. Steubenville, Ohio 43952-1763
Phone:  740-284-5192
Fax:      740-284-7228
www.franciscan.edu
 
 
 


>>> "Shahrokhi, Hossein" <ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU> 8/9/2012 12:54 PM >>>
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first
name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can
"go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!"


Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is.....

As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and
informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can
tell you about their competitors :),  but  I am afraid that the
challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with
commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to
generate sales.

Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use
this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication
channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers
(business models, product development, R&D,  etc.) if we can get the
right group engaged from the vendor side.


Hossein Shahrokhi
CIO,  University of Houston-Downtown

I have been a member of this list for more years than I can remember but have only contributed once out of concern that it might be perceived as “vendor marketing” even though the content was academic.
As a former academic (16 years at UNC-Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University as a faculty member and associate dean) and now in Microsoft education (also 16 years), I often feel the urge to academically opine on threads that emerge from the list but, as this current thread suggests,  believe that it might be perceived as marketing.  What a shame. 
While there has been some abuse from vendors, there has probably been more lost opportunity for real communication, collaboration and sharing between technology companies and universities.  I believe that both would benefit from the insights and perspectives that each could bring to the conversation. 
I am involved in numerous Executive Briefings on our campus and around the world with colleges and universities.  Clearly these are valid sales and marketing opportunities for Microsoft but what most universities come away with is a deeper understanding of how and why we make technology decisions and what direction we are taking (or should take) in the future.  Most believe that this is valuable insight but this primarily comes from the opportunity to speak and hear directly from the actual people designing and creating Microsoft products.  While time-constraints inhibit these people from participating on this list, those of us that do can be a conduit to have them address issues raised.
Sometimes, the discussions on this list are like one hand clapping.  The appropriate (not sales) voice of the technology company is missing in what could be a thoughtful and robust discussion of campus problems or opportunities.  I think a good example of the desired behavior is Casey Green and the Campus Computing Project.  While not a technology vendor he is a vendor and not an academic.  But, he consistently provides real value (i.e., data) that would otherwise go missing from the conversation.  Technology companies, many of whom have a global reach, can often bring hard data as well as a broader perspective to the issues discussed. In many cases, in order to provide specific and concrete examples, they will need to identify their products but this should not necessarily construed as marketing (although it can have that result).
So is it likely that there will be some abuse?  Yes.  As new technology companies join they will need to be enculturated into the norms of the list (the moderator seems to heretofore done a good job of that).  But on balance, I believe that the benefits of allowing more robust cross-collaboration to occur generally outweigh the possibility of an increased use of the delete mail key or setting up a rule in Outlook (opps…a shameless product placement.
Cordially,
Jim
James Garner Ptaszynski, Ph.D.
Senior Director, World Wide Higher Education
WW Public Sector – Education | Partners in Learning | Microsoft Corporation
T: +1.425.703.6890 | F: +1.425.936.7329 |
jimp@microsoft.com | gamer tag: Doctor JimP | Skype: jim.ptaszynski | Twitter: Jimptas
docendo discimus
 
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Greg Schaffer
Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 12:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation
 
On that note I am not and never have been a HE CIO (was AVP) and have been out of HE two years after over 15 years in IT roles of progressive leadership.  But I still see HE CIO as a possible future role for me and therefore I maintain membership on this list to keep up with trends and occasionally lend my fraction of a dollar.
Greg
On Aug 9, 2012 1:33 PM, "Frank J. Monaco" <frank.j.monaco@gmail.com> wrote:
As  a  long time member of this list but no longer a CIO within Higher Ed (semi-retired but doing a bit of teaching and consulting), I'd like to continue to monitor the activities of those CIOs now in the trenches.   I enjoy seeing history repeat itself, although the technology may have changed, the IT leadership challenges within Higher Education remain the same.   So I vote to at least "grandfather" former HE CIOs, even if they have gone over to the "other side".  
 
Thanks.
 
fjm
Frank J. Monaco
Former CIO, Pace University, NY 1997-2008
Former Director of Information Management, United States Military Academy at West Point, 1993-1997   
 
 
From: Kevin Sebolt <ksebolt@FRANCISCAN.EDU>
Reply-To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 13:34:58 -0400
To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation
 
 
My favorite opening line is "this is not a sales call, we're just reaching out to you".  Please.
 
I do like the idea of allowing vendors to monitor this list.  They can see first hand what our immediate and future challenges and issues are.  This list provides them better insight to hopefully provide us solutions as they develop or enhance their products. 
 
I think some of the vendors that have used this list to generate sales may not have been aware of what this list is intended for.  They are quickly addressed (thank you moderators) and not heard from again.
 
My two cents.
 
Kevin G. Sebolt
Director, Office of Information Technology
Franciscan University of Steubenville
1235 University Blvd. Steubenville, Ohio 43952-1763
Phone:  740-284-5192
Fax:      740-284-7228
www.franciscan.edu
 
 
 


>>> "Shahrokhi, Hossein" <ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU> 8/9/2012 12:54 PM >>>
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first
name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can
"go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!"


Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is.....

As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and
informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can
tell you about their competitors :),  but  I am afraid that the
challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with
commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to
generate sales.

Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use
this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication
channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers
(business models, product development, R&D,  etc.) if we can get the
right group engaged from the vendor side.


Hossein Shahrokhi
CIO,  University of Houston-Downtown

I doubt most .edu members want to filter out .com colleagues who contribute to clarify a misunderstanding, provide an intelligent perspective, have knowledge that helps resolve a problem or authority to influence product development.  The negative: anyone whose primary purpose is to harvest leads/contact info to feed email and telemarketing spam.

Keith Nelson
Chief Technology Officer
Alma College

From: "Jim Ptaszynski" <jimp@MICROSOFT.COM>
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Thursday, August 9, 2012 3:56:56 PM
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation

I have been a member of this list for more years than I can remember but have only contributed once out of concern that it might be perceived as “vendor marketing” even though the content was academic.
As a former academic (16 years at UNC-Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University as a faculty member and associate dean) and now in Microsoft education (also 16 years), I often feel the urge to academically opine on threads that emerge from the list but, as this current thread suggests,  believe that it might be perceived as marketing.  What a shame. 
While there has been some abuse from vendors, there has probably been more lost opportunity for real communication, collaboration and sharing between technology companies and universities.  I believe that both would benefit from the insights and perspectives that each could bring to the conversation. 
I am involved in numerous Executive Briefings on our campus and around the world with colleges and universities.  Clearly these are valid sales and marketing opportunities for Microsoft but what most universities come away with is a deeper understanding of how and why we make technology decisions and what direction we are taking (or should take) in the future.  Most believe that this is valuable insight but this primarily comes from the opportunity to speak and hear directly from the actual people designing and creating Microsoft products.  While time-constraints inhibit these people from participating on this list, those of us that do can be a conduit to have them address issues raised.
Sometimes, the discussions on this list are like one hand clapping.  The appropriate (not sales) voice of the technology company is missing in what could be a thoughtful and robust discussion of campus problems or opportunities.  I think a good example of the desired behavior is Casey Green and the Campus Computing Project.  While not a technology vendor he is a vendor and not an academic.  But, he consistently provides real value (i.e., data) that would otherwise go missing from the conversation.  Technology companies, many of whom have a global reach, can often bring hard data as well as a broader perspective to the issues discussed. In many cases, in order to provide specific and concrete examples, they will need to identify their products but this should not necessarily construed as marketing (although it can have that result).
So is it likely that there will be some abuse?  Yes.  As new technology companies join they will need to be enculturated into the norms of the list (the moderator seems to heretofore done a good job of that).  But on balance, I believe that the benefits of allowing more robust cross-collaboration to occur generally outweigh the possibility of an increased use of the delete mail key or setting up a rule in Outlook (opps…a shameless product placement.
Cordially,
Jim
James Garner Ptaszynski, Ph.D.
Senior Director, World Wide Higher Education
WW Public Sector – Education | Partners in Learning | Microsoft Corporation
T: +1.425.703.6890 | F: +1.425.936.7329 |
jimp@microsoft.com | gamer tag: Doctor JimP | Skype: jim.ptaszynski | Twitter: Jimptas
docendo discimus
 
From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Greg Schaffer
Sent: Thursday, August 09, 2012 12:23 PM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation
 
On that note I am not and never have been a HE CIO (was AVP) and have been out of HE two years after over 15 years in IT roles of progressive leadership.  But I still see HE CIO as a possible future role for me and therefore I maintain membership on this list to keep up with trends and occasionally lend my fraction of a dollar.
Greg
On Aug 9, 2012 1:33 PM, "Frank J. Monaco" <frank.j.monaco@gmail.com> wrote:
As  a  long time member of this list but no longer a CIO within Higher Ed (semi-retired but doing a bit of teaching and consulting), I'd like to continue to monitor the activities of those CIOs now in the trenches.   I enjoy seeing history repeat itself, although the technology may have changed, the IT leadership challenges within Higher Education remain the same.   So I vote to at least "grandfather" former HE CIOs, even if they have gone over to the "other side".  
 
Thanks.
 
fjm
Frank J. Monaco
Former CIO, Pace University, NY 1997-2008
Former Director of Information Management, United States Military Academy at West Point, 1993-1997   
 
 
From: Kevin Sebolt <ksebolt@FRANCISCAN.EDU>
Reply-To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2012 13:34:58 -0400
To: CIO List At Educause <CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [CIO] Vendor Participation
 
 
My favorite opening line is "this is not a sales call, we're just reaching out to you".  Please.
 
I do like the idea of allowing vendors to monitor this list.  They can see first hand what our immediate and future challenges and issues are.  This list provides them better insight to hopefully provide us solutions as they develop or enhance their products. 
 
I think some of the vendors that have used this list to generate sales may not have been aware of what this list is intended for.  They are quickly addressed (thank you moderators) and not heard from again.
 
My two cents.
 
Kevin G. Sebolt
Director, Office of Information Technology
Franciscan University of Steubenville
1235 University Blvd. Steubenville, Ohio 43952-1763
Phone:  740-284-5192
Fax:      740-284-7228
www.franciscan.edu
 
 
 


>>> "Shahrokhi, Hossein" <ShahrokhiH@UHD.EDU> 8/9/2012 12:54 PM >>>
My favorites are the ones who call out of blue, address you by the first
name like they have known you for many years, and literally ask if I can
"go over all the technology projects that the university is working on!"


Not sure what half a cent is worth but there it is.....

As subject matter insiders, vendors can indeed be very valuable and
informative about their areas of specialty (not to mention what they can
tell you about their competitors :),  but  I am afraid that the
challenge isn't going to be with those thoughtful vendors with
commitment to educate, but all the others whose only objective is to
generate sales.

Never the less, I think there is a real opportunity here if we can use
this list to establish a much needed direct and open communication
channel between this group and vendors' strategic decision makers
(business models, product development, R&D,  etc.) if we can get the
right group engaged from the vendor side.


Hossein Shahrokhi
CIO,  University of Houston-Downtown

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