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Please feel free to answer one/some/all - any input would be appreciated. You are welcome to answer to the list - but if you want to be sure our more business-minded list friends don't start hitting on you, feel free to just email me directly.
  • What company(ies) are you using for web-based course evaluations?
  • Do you like them - why/why not?
  • If/when you choose again, would you pick the same vendor?
  • What are some others you looked into/would consider?
  • What are some important features to consider?
  • What advice do you have for those moving in this direction?
thx
aj



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AJ Kelton
Director of Emerging & Instructional Technology
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
Montclair State University
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Comments

QM Quality Matters www.qualitymatters.org was used at a university I worked for prior to UK.  Not sure what we have in place here yet.

 

 

Tracey Snyder

University of Kentucky College of Education

ITC Department

Information Systems Technical Support

859-257-2193

tracey.snyder@uky.edu

 

AJ -

Bard College implemented on-line course evaluations that we developed ourselves.  With minor modifications we used the same questions / form that was used for our paper based evaluations.   

Important considerations are the buy-in and the planning.   Faculty and students may have have resistance to change, privacy concerns, concerns on the percentage of return.

Buy-in from the top down is essential.  This may include the Dean of the Faculty, Senate Members, and Division / Department Chairs, as well as individual faculty and, of course students.   This can be long process, but it will help with participation as you move ahead. 

I think it important that the evaluations be seen as one of several tools used for improvement of the curriculum and individual instructors.   Some schools use this as part of their mentoring program for new faculty.   

Incentives for student participation may trigger a bit of discussion.  Do you use a carrot or a stick?    For example, do you offer an earlier registration for next semester for those who have completed the process?

It is important to ensure that the individuals and their evaluation submissions cannot be connected while also ensuring that the ability to identify and remind those who have not completed their evaluations to get this done.

Some institutions have multiple groups of questions:  A set for every class at the school, a set for each specific division, and a set fro the individual classes.   You may want to consider what to do with multiple sections of the same class, particularlly when multiple instructors are involved.   This may apply to multiple lab sections within a larger single lecture class.

Bill Terry