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Has any one had any experience with whiteboard wall paint, either positive or negative?

Best,

Rob

P

 

 

Dr. Robert Paterson
Vice President, Information Technology, Planning and Research
Molloy College
Rockville Centre, NY
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Comments

We painted several columns in our Lirary Commons area for students use.  I am not sure which paint it was, but it didn’t work out as well as we had hoped.  About a year in we went back in and replaced with whiteboards. 

 

Despite our optimism, white board paint was a negative experience for the faculty.  We renovated a number of classrooms about 2 years ago and tried out the whiteboard paint concept.  Besides being something that the faculty needed to adapt to, it was also something that the cleaning crew did not manage well.  We later found that they were using the wrong cleaning supplies which damaged the paint coating.

Jake


Jake Holmquist
Director of Information Technology Services

Riverdale, NY 10471
Phone: 718-862-7449
Fax: 718-862-8024


We used the whiteboard paint in one room and it has worked very well for 18 months now. It does require regular cleaning and detailed cleaning. I have my Help Desk students do this cleaning once per week rather than leaving it to our housekeeping staff. Given this experience, we just went with the whiteboard wallpaper in a new building. That has only been open since August, so no long term experience yet.

 

Pat Schoknecht

Rollins College

 

I considered them once, but read somewhere that, besides being very costly, it was also toxic.

Shady

___________________________________
Shady Azzam-Gómez
Director, Project Management and Support
S5420 Melville Library
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook, NY 11794-3383
Phone: 631.632.3800


We’ve never tried the paint, but have had good experiences with walltalkers, which is a wallpaper writing surface.

 

www.walltalkers.com

 

 

 

We had a similar experience in a trial use; it just didn’t work out with us.  We decided to stay with whiteboards. However, I do know of a partner institution who uses it in a small office collaboration context and loves it. However, they are a very small office and have the time and limited personnel to clean it appropriately.

 

Rachel

 

 

Rachel Desmarais

Vice President, Planning and Information Services

Forsyth Technical Community College

336.734.7175

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jake Holmquist
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 10:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

Despite our optimism, white board paint was a negative experience for the faculty.  We renovated a number of classrooms about 2 years ago and tried out the whiteboard paint concept.  Besides being something that the faculty needed to adapt to, it was also something that the cleaning crew did not manage well.  We later found that they were using the wrong cleaning supplies which damaged the paint coating.

 

Jake

 


Jake Holmquist

Director of Information Technology Services

Riverdale, NY 10471

Phone: 718-862-7449

Fax: 718-862-8024

 

From a purely personal perspective, I teach a class once a week in a lab that was renovated two years ago with whiteboard wallpaper. The cleaning issue is dealt with by asking faculty to clean the walls after each class -- which doesn't always happen, but it's respected well enough that the walls still look good. The department went with wallpaper over paint after testing both. 

Also, I have to say that it's a lot of fun being able to write floor to ceiling, from one wall to another. 

On Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Pat Schoknecht wrote:

We used the whiteboard paint in one room and it has worked very well for 18 months now. It does require regular cleaning and detailed cleaning. I have my Help Desk students do this cleaning once per week rather than leaving it to our housekeeping staff. Given this experience, we just went with the whiteboard wallpaper in a new building. That has only been open since August, so no long term experience yet.

 

Pat Schoknecht

Rollins College

 

We have a building that used exclusively whiteboard paint.  I don't recall the vendor, but Herman Miller brought them to us, so they might know who it was.

It's been positive, especially on conjunction with short-throw intelligent projectors.  It gives us interactive walls and students/instructors seem to like it.

We put the stuff in about 18-24 months ago.

Brian Miller
V.P. Information Technology Services & CIO
Davenport University
6191 Kraft Ave. SE / Broadmoor Suite 270
Grand Rapids, MI 49512
p. 616.732.1195 | c. 616-821-2618
brian.miller@davenport.edu

Follow us on Twitterhttps://twitter.com/davenportuit
Rate my Customer Service: http://great.davenport.edu/report/bmiller


We’ve had good luck with the paint thus far (IDEA Paint), but it’s still early. Time will tell. Some thoughts/suggestions if you’re leaning that direction:

 

1)      The wall has to be prepped very, very well. There are grades of drywall finish. Your wall needs to be of the highest prep and smoothest finish. This paint will not be kind to imperfections.

2)      It takes 7 days to cure, so plan accordingly.

3)      While ’toxic’ smelling when being applied, many enamel paint products have the same limitation. Just be sure to ventilate well. No lingering smell after it dries at all.

4)      There’s some YouTube videos available regarding application. You should work in 3’ sections using a roller. We tried a spray application and it left some streaks. Following the instructional videos will likely result in a better, more consistent finish.

5)      Cost-wise, it’s comparable to a Wall-Talker. Maybe a little less expensive. Wall-Talkers also have installation considerations.

6)      We’ve not had any issues with dry erase markers, streaking, ‘ghosting’ or other anomalies. In fact, the surface dries very hard and very durable. Easy to erase and maintain.

7)      It dries to a rather shiny surface, so it you’re using a traditional ceiling projector with IDEA Paint you may experience hot spots. We’re using a short-throw Epson and it works very well in tandem with the paint. No hot spots. (A function of the physics with the projector lens.)

8)      Can be tinted to any color you want.

9)      Not certain how we’ll manage damage should it occur. (Someone accidently penetrating the drywall surface with a cart or something.) I assume it can be patched.

 

Either option is better than traditional whiteboards. We would install it again. Faculty have responded favorably.

 

RG

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jake Holmquist
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 9:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

Despite our optimism, white board paint was a negative experience for the faculty.  We renovated a number of classrooms about 2 years ago and tried out the whiteboard paint concept.  Besides being something that the faculty needed to adapt to, it was also something that the cleaning crew did not manage well.  We later found that they were using the wrong cleaning supplies which damaged the paint coating.

 

Jake

 


Jake Holmquist

Director of Information Technology Services

Riverdale, NY 10471

Phone: 718-862-7449

Fax: 718-862-8024

 

We went recently went with the whiteboard wall paint….

I’m expecting we’ll be back using whiteboards shortly.

 

Gary

------------------------

Gary Kelley

Chief Information Systems Officer

Endicott College

376 Hale Street, Beverly MA 01915

Office:  978-232-2048

gkelley@endicott.edu

 

 

In our experience, to succeed with whiteboard alternatives (WallTalker or IDEA Paint), these things need to be kept in mind:

 

1.)    Spaces need to be prepared very well (re-emphasizing Rob’s point).  We have had at least 2 jobs that had to be completely redone because of lack of understanding/planning

2.)    There is typically special cleaning procedures that need to be put in place (educating faculty, housekeeping or if fortunate enough to have them, your staff).

3.)    It takes time to prep, hang, and cure (paint only).  Meaning, the room is usually down for a couple of weeks, minimum.  Conversely, a whiteboard hanging takes a couple of hours

4.)    Think about use.  All of these surfaces will have some glare (hot spot) from a traditional projector to the audience.  Is there more writing or projecting?  That will determine what sheen you can install.  I have found no “perfect” surface that can write and project that works as well as a whiteboard/projector screen combination.

5.)    For #4, you can mitigate the hot spot if you use a short-throw projector.  A short throw shines a hotspot away from the audience, so the surface can be as glossy as you want (great for writing).  I have found the limiting factor for these projectors to be the image size – not ideal for large lecture rooms (tipping point is probably size 40).

 

JP

 

JP Peters, MBA

Director, Information Technology and Communications

College of Sciences / COSIT

University of Central Florida

407-823-1209

jp@ucf.edu

http://www.cos.ucf.edu/it

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Rob Gibson
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 10:34 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

We’ve had good luck with the paint thus far (IDEA Paint), but it’s still early. Time will tell. Some thoughts/suggestions if you’re leaning that direction:

 

1)      The wall has to be prepped very, very well. There are grades of drywall finish. Your wall needs to be of the highest prep and smoothest finish. This paint will not be kind to imperfections.

2)      It takes 7 days to cure, so plan accordingly.

3)      While ’toxic’ smelling when being applied, many enamel paint products have the same limitation. Just be sure to ventilate well. No lingering smell after it dries at all.

4)      There’s some YouTube videos available regarding application. You should work in 3’ sections using a roller. We tried a spray application and it left some streaks. Following the instructional videos will likely result in a better, more consistent finish.

5)      Cost-wise, it’s comparable to a Wall-Talker. Maybe a little less expensive. Wall-Talkers also have installation considerations.

6)      We’ve not had any issues with dry erase markers, streaking, ‘ghosting’ or other anomalies. In fact, the surface dries very hard and very durable. Easy to erase and maintain.

7)      It dries to a rather shiny surface, so it you’re using a traditional ceiling projector with IDEA Paint you may experience hot spots. We’re using a short-throw Epson and it works very well in tandem with the paint. No hot spots. (A function of the physics with the projector lens.)

8)      Can be tinted to any color you want.

9)      Not certain how we’ll manage damage should it occur. (Someone accidently penetrating the drywall surface with a cart or something.) I assume it can be patched.

 

Either option is better than traditional whiteboards. We would install it again. Faculty have responded favorably.

 

RG

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jake Holmquist
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 9:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

Despite our optimism, white board paint was a negative experience for the faculty.  We renovated a number of classrooms about 2 years ago and tried out the whiteboard paint concept.  Besides being something that the faculty needed to adapt to, it was also something that the cleaning crew did not manage well.  We later found that they were using the wrong cleaning supplies which damaged the paint coating.

 

Jake

 


Jake Holmquist

Director of Information Technology Services

Riverdale, NY 10471

Phone: 718-862-7449

Fax: 718-862-8024

 

Over the past 3 years we have used whiteboard paint in about 10 rooms (out of 85 classrooms).  There are certainly some things to consider:

·         regular cleaning (custodial staff clean the walls 3 times a week)

·         proper supplies (we provide paper towel dispensers on each wall, and a spray cleaner)

·         proper application (wall prep, drying time, etc….)

·         Will the wall be used for a projector display? (the paint is quite reflective and projector glare needs to be considered, we kept the screens in place)

 

However, our faculty and students really like and appreciate the writing walls…  I have observed classes in session and watched as student groups have charted, listed, and diagramed complex material on the walls, and quickly snap pictures with their cell phones and post the results.

 

Two additional rooms have large whiteboard tables – and similar instructional activities take place there.

 

I’m a fan…. even with the challenges.   J

 

--Dave

 

Dave Tindall
Asst VP for Technology Services (CIO)
Seattle Pacific University
Computer & Information Systems
Phone: (206) 281-2239
Mobile:  (206) 940-1736
Fax: (206) 281-2850
Email: dtindall@spu.edu
Web: www.spu.edu

 

Not a "great" experience with Walltalkers.  It is easier (sometimes) then pulling down an existing chalkboard, reparing the wall, and putting up a new whiteboard (just resurface chalkboard with wallktalker).  but in our experience, it doesn't clean as well, and is very succeptible to ghosting images.  I really want to take all the walltalker stuff out, and put in new whiteboards (we have about 22 rooms with walltalkers) - faculty don't like them, and they don't look good after a few years of use.

Darrell Lutey
Assistant Director, 702-895-0763
Office of Information Technology, UNLV
CBC B129 / Mail Stop 7040
http://oit.unlv.edu  |  Twitter@unlv_oit
IT Help Desk: 702-895-0777




We had a similar challenge with chalkboards. We found it cost effective to keep the chalkboard frame, remove the board, and replace with whiteboard material cut to size into existing frame (similar to melamine but different, sorry I can’t recall the name). We also tried the paint with varying results – we chose not to use it except in limited areas, mostly conference rooms.

 

Ilya Yakovlev

CIO

University of Wisconsin-Parkside

 

Hi Rob,

About 1 1/2 years ago, when my unit moved into a new space, we decided to go with IdeaPaint for all the walls.  As a company, they were a pleasure to work with.  The product is touchy and the directions do need to be followed to the letter.  Our painting crew screwed up the first can they tried.  My only main gripe is that sometimes (due to how it was applied) the marker does not come off, or come off easily.  As we had extra, I also had the walls of my office done.

The students who work in my lab have taken to putting "art" on the walls, and the faculty who come in love it!  There are also great saying written about the room and we use the walls to communicate with everyone, like when the printer is down, or to remind people to turn off the lights (notice the very creative Lumier in the right of the picture).  I love having my office walls done - for frequently called numbers around campus, temporary projects that are being worked on, or the occasional note from someone.

During a few meetings in the lab we have used them as collaborative spaces to work together, and it did work well for that.  I'll often "illustrate" something on the wall (instead of paper) when I'm working with faculty.

Three suggestions:
  • Know what you want to use the space for.  Be realistic in the expectations.  People have taken a long time to get used to "writing on the walls" - it seems to go against our grain.  (Writing on a "white board" is different, somehow).  I've actually had someone tell me they "just didn't feel right writing on the wall".
  • Make sure the installation is done properly - don't necessarily trust this job to in-house folks if they've never done this type of paint before.  
  • As for time frame, our room (about 450 square feet) was painted on a Thursday over the summer, we were closed on that Friday, and we began using the space again on Monday, although the paint needs to cure for a week before writing on the walls.
  • Make sure the room has EXCELLENT ventilation and have HVAC turn off the vents to that space during the painting if possible
If I had to do it all over again, I'd do it all over again.  :-) 

aj



We tried in our own conference room location. Cleaning was an issue as noted.  Use of a wrong marker was easier to deal with whiteboards (replace the whiteboard) versus getting a wall painted.  We went back to whiteboards. 

Theresa

On Tuesday, November 19, 2013, Robert Paterson wrote:

Has any one had any experience with whiteboard wall paint, either positive or negative?

Best,

Rob

P

 

 

Dr. Robert Paterson
Vice President, Information Technology, Planning and Research
Molloy College
Rockville Centre, NY
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.



--
Theresa Rowe on the road
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.

Sorry for the second email, I inadvertently left off the photo.  Had I not referred to it in my note, it would not have been a big deal.  :)



We have been using the IDEA Paint in selected classrooms and conference rooms over the past three years.  I would agree with everything stated here.  Preparation if very important.  Our installations have been doing well so far with little damage.  We include a micro cloth for cleaning in each of the installations.  The cloth works better than erasers, can be washed periodically and are very inexpensive.  We clean more thoroughly periodically with spray.   The whiteboard walls are very popular here.

 

Loretta

 

Loretta Andrews
Director of Campus Computing and Information Technology
Carroll  College
(406)447-4508
landrews@carroll.edu

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Rob Gibson
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 8:34 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

We’ve had good luck with the paint thus far (IDEA Paint), but it’s still early. Time will tell. Some thoughts/suggestions if you’re leaning that direction:

 

1)      The wall has to be prepped very, very well. There are grades of drywall finish. Your wall needs to be of the highest prep and smoothest finish. This paint will not be kind to imperfections.

2)      It takes 7 days to cure, so plan accordingly.

3)      While ’toxic’ smelling when being applied, many enamel paint products have the same limitation. Just be sure to ventilate well. No lingering smell after it dries at all.

4)      There’s some YouTube videos available regarding application. You should work in 3’ sections using a roller. We tried a spray application and it left some streaks. Following the instructional videos will likely result in a better, more consistent finish.

5)      Cost-wise, it’s comparable to a Wall-Talker. Maybe a little less expensive. Wall-Talkers also have installation considerations.

6)      We’ve not had any issues with dry erase markers, streaking, ‘ghosting’ or other anomalies. In fact, the surface dries very hard and very durable. Easy to erase and maintain.

7)      It dries to a rather shiny surface, so it you’re using a traditional ceiling projector with IDEA Paint you may experience hot spots. We’re using a short-throw Epson and it works very well in tandem with the paint. No hot spots. (A function of the physics with the projector lens.)

8)      Can be tinted to any color you want.

9)      Not certain how we’ll manage damage should it occur. (Someone accidently penetrating the drywall surface with a cart or something.) I assume it can be patched.

 

Either option is better than traditional whiteboards. We would install it again. Faculty have responded favorably.

 

RG

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE CIO Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Jake Holmquist
Sent: Tuesday, November 19, 2013 9:11 AM
To: CIO@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [CIO] Whiteboard walls

 

Despite our optimism, white board paint was a negative experience for the faculty.  We renovated a number of classrooms about 2 years ago and tried out the whiteboard paint concept.  Besides being something that the faculty needed to adapt to, it was also something that the cleaning crew did not manage well.  We later found that they were using the wrong cleaning supplies which damaged the paint coating.

 

Jake

 


Jake Holmquist

Director of Information Technology Services

Riverdale, NY 10471

Phone: 718-862-7449

Fax: 718-862-8024

 

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