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Reminder – Today is the IT COMM Virtual Coffee Shop with presentations on Google Analytics.

Whether you are new to tracking how visitors interact with your web pages, or need to drill down into the data, the duo on our panel will cover tips to get you started and/or take your use of Google Analytics further.

Coffee Shop Login Information

Phone Line: 877.944.230 Code: 99281

Meeting Room: https://educause.acms.com/cg

Please login as a guest. Type in your name and institution.


Time Zone Information

6:00-7:00 AM Hawaiian Islands time (HST)

9:00-10:00 AM Pacific Coast Time (PST)

10:00-11:00 AM Rocky Mountains/El Paso Time (MST)

11:00 AM-Noon Central Standard Time (CST)

Noon-1:00 PM - Eastern Standard Time (EST)

____________________________
Julie Olivieri Gillis
Director, Technology Implementation & Communication
Boston College
617.552.0396

Six Values. One I.T.S.

Collaboration - Continuous Improvement - Innovation - 

People - Service - Transparency



From: Julie Gillis <julie.gillis@bc.edu>
Date: Tue, 8 Oct 2013 16:38:05 -0400
To: <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Coffee Shop Oct. 11: Refocus Communication using Google Analytics

Hi IT Communicators,

Our Virtual Coffee Shops continue this Friday, October 11, with Part 2 of the Google Analytics discussion.  [Notes from Part 1: http://www.educause.edu/wiki/sept-2013]

Whether you are new to tracking how visitors interact with your web pages, or need to drill down into the data, the duo on our panel will cover tips to get you started and/or take your use of Google Analytics further:

  • Patrick Chinn, University of Oregon
  • Don Kasprzak, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

We meet in the online coffee shop at 11am CT the second Friday of every month September through May to discuss our challenges and successes and learn from each other.

Notes from previous Coffee Shops:

Main Wiki Page for IT COMM Constituent group:

See you this Friday in the Coffee Shop.

Regards,
Julie
____________________________
Julie Olivieri Gillis
Director, Technology Implementation & Communication
Boston College
617.552.0396

Six Values. One I.T.S.

Collaboration - Continuous Improvement - Innovation - 

People - Service - Transparency


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Hello IT Communicators, I am working on an assignment that has highlighted the need for engaging imagery because the work many faculty are doing is on financial analysis and other topics, that, while critical to business, don't lend themselves to cool, engaging imagery.    A little like IT   8-)

Infographics is a strategy that I am pursuing and I wanted to share with you.  I realize that you may not all have web teams working for you, but you may be partnering with them and/or marketing teams to promote your school, college or university.  Of course, Infographics can be used to promote your services as IT providers.  

Designing and developing infographics can help in the following ways:

~ increase your strategic partnership with research scientists and faculty around late-breaking research in your institution. 
~develop engaging imagery that tells the story by leveraging great content while providing material that promotes the school, college, university AND your faculty
develop engaging imagery that tells the story of how your services serve your school, college, university AND your faculty
~ justify you having to say NO to many requests, in order to focus on engaging messaging  ~ if you have web teams~

So what is an infographic:  

http://sco.lt/8toRXt  (the infographic is about Responsive Design, but the article is about the what, why, and how of infographics)

How to design a good infographic:


Happy Friday!

Al

-- 
Al Gonzalez

Senior Operations Officer, University Communications  &
Interim Director of Marketing, 
School of Hotel Administration
(w) 607-254-8631
(m) 607-342-5322


********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005

Phone Line: 877.944.2300http://www.educause.edu/sites/all/modules/contrib/extlink/extlink.png); background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding-right: 12px; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 16.796875px; orphans: auto; text-align: start; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: auto; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-position: 100% 50%; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;"> Code: 99281
Hi Carlyn, I am no longer in IT but I can tell you the process I would recommend to determine a story.  I has to do with my diagram below, and, as you may have guessed, it is connected to the strategic plan of the organization.

I would first ensure that there are communication plans around the Goals or Key Result Areas of an organization(see below).  Then, I would look to use infographics to communicate messages to target audiences that are intended to cause engagement and reaction based on a current need of the organization.  

Lets say you are rolling out a new email service, there would be a key result area or goal targeting user acceptance and adaptation.  I would then look to use an infographic, or a number of them, to communicate the features and benefits of the change around specific objectives, such as cost savings, reliability, security.  I would also look to build some sort of user feedback right into the infographic based on what you are communicating.  

So, my answer as a strategic communicator is to be intentional with our messaging.    For anyone interested on more strategic planning info, here is a scoop.it I wrote to share the basics around this inverted triangle.    http://sco.lt/8x0L69

Infographics and many communication products are tactics at the bottom of the triangle.  If we invest in strategic planning, our communication tactics can be used with strategic intent. Metrics can then be collected and help us learn from our efforts!  8-)





-- 
Al Gonzalez

Senior Operations Officer, University Communications  &
Interim Director of Marketing, 
School of Hotel Administration
(w) 607-254-8631
(m) 607-342-5322


From: Carlyn Chatfield <carlyn@RICE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, October 11, 2013 10:38 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005

I found the Lynda.com courses on infographics to be surprisingly helpful when it came to thinking about planning infographics. Who knew graphic designers liked Excel tables so much? :-)  But those course are definitely worth going through if you're starting at square one like I did with infographics.

I've only had the chance to create one infographic this Fall, but we're hoping to regularly put them out during the school year. It'd be easier/faster if we had a graphic designer. Right now it's just me and my rudimentary photoshop skills. 

As for stories to tell, just to start, most of our campus doesn't realize the size of the audience we serve. So some of my infographics are just going to help frame an easy to follow narrative: CITES helps a lot of people at the University of Illinois use information technology. 

Infographics that support that simple starting point for a story include the number of people our Help Desk assisted the first week of classes, the amount of email we process on a daily basis, the number of students using our LMS, etc.


We want to tell more complex stories than that (e.g. Infographic explaining overload on our wireless this year compared to other years), but starting with the easy ideas gets us into the infographic routine.


One other thing to build off another topic Kevin started on this list: 

I actually had one of our accessibility experts catch me when I went to publish that infographic. He pointed out the obvious — a jpg infographic by itself is NOT accessible. Thankfully, he also offered to pull the information into an accessible format.

So now when we publish infographics, we're also publishing text versions of the data under the image as you can see on the web page above. 


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Carlyn Chatfield <carlyn@RICE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, October 11, 2013 9:38 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005

Great tip on accessibility for infographics!  And audience size is a manageable "byte" that I think we can get our heads around for our first infographic. 

Thanks for sharing how you got started,
Carlyn

On 10/14/2013 10:46 AM, Mertz, Brian E wrote:
I found the Lynda.com courses on infographics to be surprisingly helpful when it came to thinking about planning infographics. Who knew graphic designers liked Excel tables so much? :-)  But those course are definitely worth going through if you're starting at square one like I did with infographics.

I've only had the chance to create one infographic this Fall, but we're hoping to regularly put them out during the school year. It'd be easier/faster if we had a graphic designer. Right now it's just me and my rudimentary photoshop skills. 

As for stories to tell, just to start, most of our campus doesn't realize the size of the audience we serve. So some of my infographics are just going to help frame an easy to follow narrative: CITES helps a lot of people at the University of Illinois use information technology. 

Infographics that support that simple starting point for a story include the number of people our Help Desk assisted the first week of classes, the amount of email we process on a daily basis, the number of students using our LMS, etc.


We want to tell more complex stories than that (e.g. Infographic explaining overload on our wireless this year compared to other years), but starting with the easy ideas gets us into the infographic routine.


One other thing to build off another topic Kevin started on this list: 

I actually had one of our accessibility experts catch me when I went to publish that infographic. He pointed out the obvious — a jpg infographic by itself is NOT accessible. Thankfully, he also offered to pull the information into an accessible format.

So now when we publish infographics, we're also publishing text versions of the data under the image as you can see on the web page above. 


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Carlyn Chatfield <carlyn@RICE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, October 11, 2013 9:38 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005

Brian, nice job!  There are a number of free online apps that help us non-graphic designers develop good Infographics.  The scoop below links to an article that provides 10 tools that allow you to create Infographics online, many for free.   My favorite is Piktochart.


Al
-- 
-- 
Al Gonzalez

Senior Operations Officer, University Communications  &
Interim Director of Marketing, 
School of Hotel Administration
(w) 607-254-8631
(m) 607-342-5322


From: <Mertz>, Brian E <bmertz@ILLINOIS.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 14, 2013 11:46 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

I found the Lynda.com courses on infographics to be surprisingly helpful when it came to thinking about planning infographics. Who knew graphic designers liked Excel tables so much? :-)  But those course are definitely worth going through if you're starting at square one like I did with infographics.

I've only had the chance to create one infographic this Fall, but we're hoping to regularly put them out during the school year. It'd be easier/faster if we had a graphic designer. Right now it's just me and my rudimentary photoshop skills. 

As for stories to tell, just to start, most of our campus doesn't realize the size of the audience we serve. So some of my infographics are just going to help frame an easy to follow narrative: CITES helps a lot of people at the University of Illinois use information technology. 

Infographics that support that simple starting point for a story include the number of people our Help Desk assisted the first week of classes, the amount of email we process on a daily basis, the number of students using our LMS, etc.


We want to tell more complex stories than that (e.g. Infographic explaining overload on our wireless this year compared to other years), but starting with the easy ideas gets us into the infographic routine.


One other thing to build off another topic Kevin started on this list: 

I actually had one of our accessibility experts catch me when I went to publish that infographic. He pointed out the obvious — a jpg infographic by itself is NOT accessible. Thankfully, he also offered to pull the information into an accessible format.

So now when we publish infographics, we're also publishing text versions of the data under the image as you can see on the web page above. 


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Carlyn Chatfield <carlyn@RICE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, October 11, 2013 9:38 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005

My apologies to the list, the link that I scooped a while back appears to have been changed by the publisher.    Here is the direct link:  http://www.edudemic.com/diy-infographics/
-- 
Al Gonzalez

Senior Operations Officer, University Communications  &
Interim Director of Marketing, 
School of Hotel Administration
(w) 607-254-8631
(m) 607-342-5322


From: Systems Administrator <ag262@cornell.edu>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 14, 2013 12:15 PM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Brian, nice job!  There are a number of free online apps that help us non-graphic designers develop good Infographics.  The scoop below links to an article that provides 10 tools that allow you to create Infographics online, many for free.   My favorite is Piktochart.


Al
-- 
-- 
Al Gonzalez

Senior Operations Officer, University Communications  &
Interim Director of Marketing, 
School of Hotel Administration
(w) 607-254-8631
(m) 607-342-5322


From: <Mertz>, Brian E <bmertz@ILLINOIS.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 14, 2013 11:46 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

I found the Lynda.com courses on infographics to be surprisingly helpful when it came to thinking about planning infographics. Who knew graphic designers liked Excel tables so much? :-)  But those course are definitely worth going through if you're starting at square one like I did with infographics.

I've only had the chance to create one infographic this Fall, but we're hoping to regularly put them out during the school year. It'd be easier/faster if we had a graphic designer. Right now it's just me and my rudimentary photoshop skills. 

As for stories to tell, just to start, most of our campus doesn't realize the size of the audience we serve. So some of my infographics are just going to help frame an easy to follow narrative: CITES helps a lot of people at the University of Illinois use information technology. 

Infographics that support that simple starting point for a story include the number of people our Help Desk assisted the first week of classes, the amount of email we process on a daily basis, the number of students using our LMS, etc.


We want to tell more complex stories than that (e.g. Infographic explaining overload on our wireless this year compared to other years), but starting with the easy ideas gets us into the infographic routine.


One other thing to build off another topic Kevin started on this list: 

I actually had one of our accessibility experts catch me when I went to publish that infographic. He pointed out the obvious — a jpg infographic by itself is NOT accessible. Thankfully, he also offered to pull the information into an accessible format.

So now when we publish infographics, we're also publishing text versions of the data under the image as you can see on the web page above. 


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Carlyn Chatfield <carlyn@RICE.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Friday, October 11, 2013 9:38 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Infographics Info Friday Share

Thanks, Al! I have two student workers who are talented at graphics but I haven't known what data to feed them.  I really struggle with how to use analytics, and the infographic seems to be the creative representation of an assortment of facts.

Would you consider walking us through the steps you take to tell a Cornell IT story with an infographic?    Do you determine the story you want to tell and then hunt for analytics to support it, or do you stumble across interesting numbers and think, "huh.  might be a story there..." ?

Carlyn Chatfield
Manager, IT Technical Communications
Rice University
Houston, Texas 77005