Main Nav

I’m looking for good examples of HE IT department and/or executive blogs.  If you‘ve got one going that you’re proud of and want to share it, please point me to it.  I love to hear about your content and participation methodologies, and any advice you have, particularly related to getting employees/leadership involved as participating bloggers.

 

Thanks!

 

Chris Finkle

Communications Manager | Information Technology and Services | Syracuse University

Center for Science & Technology, Syracuse, NY 13244-4100

p: 315/ 443-1219 | m: 315/559-2493

cfinkle@syr.edu | http://its.syr.edu

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Brandeis University Library & Technology Services started a blog in early July, and we post to it weekly. Each of the nine groups within our merged library & IT department is assigned to post every nine weeks, but we may ultimately revise that schedule so that groups that are more front-facing post more frequently. (People at the help desk, for example, may want to engage with the community more than our database administrators want to.) We leave it up to the directors of each of these nine groups to decide the topics of their posts and to find authors for their posts. Anyone in our 100-person department can write a post, but his/her director is the one to approve it and actually press that Publish button. We have a range of writing styles and skills, and the variety makes the blog more interesting. Being a merged organization, we have an incredible range of services. We decided, however, that simplifying content to make it accessible by everyone across the University would mean that we would have no compelling content. So, we welcome technical or specialized posts, e.g. ones that discuss "stacks plugged in to dedicated Cisco 6500-E switches configured as VSS, eliminating HSRP and spanning tree protocols and easing configuration management" or "seminal Digital Humanities texts, text encoding, markup languages, relational databases, textual analysis, digital publishing, Digital Humanities infrastructure, Digital Humanities competences, and the history of computing in the humanities." We don't expect anyone to read every post, but we hope that people will read the posts that they find most relevant for their work or interests. You can check out our blog here: http://blogs.brandeis.edu/lts/ So that content on our departmental homepage stays current, we feed excerpts from the latest three posts to our homepage. This has the added benefit that people need not remember the URL of our blog. http://lts.brandeis.edu/ Let me know if you have any questions. Best, Lindsay -- Lindsay Barton Assistant Director for LTS Policy, Planning, & Analysis Library & Technology Services Brandeis University
Thanks, Lindsay! Very useful! Who does the "assigning" and how is that managed/enforced/policed? C- -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindsay Barton Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 4:58 PM To: ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Departmental/Executive Blogs Brandeis University Library & Technology Services started a blog in early July, and we post to it weekly. Each of the nine groups within our merged library & IT department is assigned to post every nine weeks, but we may ultimately revise that schedule so that groups that are more front-facing post more frequently. (People at the help desk, for example, may want to engage with the community more than our database administrators want to.) We leave it up to the directors of each of these nine groups to decide the topics of their posts and to find authors for their posts. Anyone in our 100-person department can write a post, but his/her director is the one to approve it and actually press that Publish button. We have a range of writing styles and skills, and the variety makes the blog more interesting. Being a merged organization, we have an incredible range of services. We decided, however, that simplifying content to make it accessible by everyone across the University would mean that we would have no compelling content. So, we welcome technical or specialized posts, e.g. ones that discuss "stacks plugged in to dedicated Cisco 6500-E switches configured as VSS, eliminating HSRP and spanning tree protocols and easing configuration management" or "seminal Digital Humanities texts, text encoding, markup languages, relational databases, textual analysis, digital publishing, Digital Humanities infrastructure, Digital Humanities competences, and the history of computing in the humanities." We don't expect anyone to read every post, but we hope that people will read the posts that they find most relevant for their work or interests. You can check out our blog here: http://blogs.brandeis.edu/lts/ So that content on our departmental homepage stays current, we feed excerpts from the latest three posts to our homepage. This has the added benefit that people need not remember the URL of our blog. http://lts.brandeis.edu/ Let me know if you have any questions. Best, Lindsay -- Lindsay Barton Assistant Director for LTS Policy, Planning, & Analysis Library & Technology Services Brandeis University
I assigned the groups to particular dates with the CIO's blessing. The departmental leadership group (essentially, all the directors) would be the group that decides whether or not to allow some groups to post more frequently than other groups. We're a pretty good team, and people play by the rules. People don't publish early, for example, even if they finish writing a post early. We've missed a week here and there throughout the 3.5 months we've been at it, but posting has been pretty consistent. Some directors are still unconvinced as to how much value there is in posting to the blog, but they've generally come around when we discuss that this type of outreach can actually make their lives easier, e.g. if they use it as an opportunity to discuss an upcoming project. *Everyone*, after all, has customers. The customers are just different. At the launch of the blog, I met with each director individually to discuss potential topics. We have a Google Spreadsheet of date/group/author/topic so that people can look up their group's next post date and figure out appropriate topics, in part in light of what's already or recently been discussed. Some directors still run topics by me, but not all; the blog is pretty self-sufficient at this point. Lindsay
I appreciate your insights. Thanks again. -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Lindsay Barton Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 10:48 PM To: ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Departmental/Executive Blogs I assigned the groups to particular dates with the CIO's blessing. The departmental leadership group (essentially, all the directors) would be the group that decides whether or not to allow some groups to post more frequently than other groups. We're a pretty good team, and people play by the rules. People don't publish early, for example, even if they finish writing a post early. We've missed a week here and there throughout the 3.5 months we've been at it, but posting has been pretty consistent. Some directors are still unconvinced as to how much value there is in posting to the blog, but they've generally come around when we discuss that this type of outreach can actually make their lives easier, e.g. if they use it as an opportunity to discuss an upcoming project. *Everyone*, after all, has customers. The customers are just different. At the launch of the blog, I met with each director individually to discuss potential topics. We have a Google Spreadsheet of date/group/author/topic so that people can look up their group's next post date and figure out appropriate topics, in part in light of what's already or recently been discussed. Some directors still run topics by me, but not all; the blog is pretty self-sufficient at this point. Lindsay