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I am looking to see what Website accessibility you have at your institution.

Is there a person or group responsible to make sure your websites are accessible?

What is their role and authority?

Do they provide training?

How do you handle making sure academic online courses are accessible?

Who is responsible for that?



If you have something to share, even if you have struggled with these same questions/ideas,  I would like to hear about it.

Kevin Reeve
Utah State University.


P.S.  Looking forward to seeing many of you at EDUCAUSE.







********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Kevin,

IT accessibility has always been a major priority at Illinois. When I started here, it took me a little bit of time to adjust to thinking about accessibility when working on projects. Now it's impossible not to consider it with every project. For example, in my mind designing something in Flash is just wasting everyone's time.

On campus, we have the Disability Resources and Educational Services Division (DRES) that among many, many services offers the campus help with creating accessible digital resources. 

In addition, several staff members within our central IT organization are dedicated to making sure our content, web sites and services are accessible. They also consult with departments on accessibility issues.

This mini-site has been helpful to many people that have IT accessibility issues: http://itaccessibility.illinois.edu

And then there are regular training events, brown bags, speakers, etc all focused on accessibility hosted by DRES.

How we guarantee that services, apps and content from vendors are accessible is that we write accessibility evaluations into our RFP process, and accessibility requirements into our contract language. 

As for homegrown apps and services, at Illinois there is a culture and mindset fostered over many years that if the service isn't accessible, it really isn't a service ready to deploy to all of campus or to use for mission critical activities. 

That mindset really takes care of accessibility "enforcement" for us. When someone raises a concern that a service isn't accessible, service developers don't fight back against that evaluation, they get help from the evaluators to make the service accessible.

Even when we publish infographics, we try to include an accessible version of the data: https://www.cites.illinois.edu/news/2013/20130923-onesandzeros.html (the text version at the bottom)

An example of a homegrown service with dedication to accessibility is our eText service: https://etext.illinois.edu/features.html

The National Federation of the Blind commended us for that dedication to accessibility: 

I'd be happy to get you in contact with some of our accessibility experts if you'd like to pick their brains.

Brian


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Kevin Reeve <Kevin.Reeve@USU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:55 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

I am looking to see what Website accessibility you have at your institution.

Is there a person or group responsible to make sure your websites are accessible?

What is their role and authority?

Do they provide training?

How do you handle making sure academic online courses are accessible?

Who is responsible for that?



If you have something to share, even if you have struggled with these same questions/ideas,  I would like to hear about it.

Kevin Reeve
Utah State University.


P.S.  Looking forward to seeing many of you at EDUCAUSE.







********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hats off to Illinois for what sounds like a pretty comprehensive commitment to web accessibility. It's sometimes challenging to get everyone to think about it upfront, once you get over the hump, peers seem to remind each other about it. 

At Indiana, we have the Adaptive Technology and Accessibility Centers, and in Dec 2009 a best practices document was published and accepted by the university wide web standards committee. I can send a copy of that, if you'd like, Kevin.

Thanks,
Chuck

Chuck Aikman
(812) 855-7572

From: <Mertz>, Brian E <bmertz@ILLINOIS.EDU>
Reply-To: EDUCAUSE Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 11:17 AM
To: EDUCAUSE Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

Kevin,

IT accessibility has always been a major priority at Illinois. When I started here, it took me a little bit of time to adjust to thinking about accessibility when working on projects. Now it's impossible not to consider it with every project. For example, in my mind designing something in Flash is just wasting everyone's time.

On campus, we have the Disability Resources and Educational Services Division (DRES) that among many, many services offers the campus help with creating accessible digital resources. 

In addition, several staff members within our central IT organization are dedicated to making sure our content, web sites and services are accessible. They also consult with departments on accessibility issues.

This mini-site has been helpful to many people that have IT accessibility issues: http://itaccessibility.illinois.edu

And then there are regular training events, brown bags, speakers, etc all focused on accessibility hosted by DRES.

How we guarantee that services, apps and content from vendors are accessible is that we write accessibility evaluations into our RFP process, and accessibility requirements into our contract language. 

As for homegrown apps and services, at Illinois there is a culture and mindset fostered over many years that if the service isn't accessible, it really isn't a service ready to deploy to all of campus or to use for mission critical activities. 

That mindset really takes care of accessibility "enforcement" for us. When someone raises a concern that a service isn't accessible, service developers don't fight back against that evaluation, they get help from the evaluators to make the service accessible.

Even when we publish infographics, we try to include an accessible version of the data: https://www.cites.illinois.edu/news/2013/20130923-onesandzeros.html (the text version at the bottom)

An example of a homegrown service with dedication to accessibility is our eText service: https://etext.illinois.edu/features.html

The National Federation of the Blind commended us for that dedication to accessibility: 

I'd be happy to get you in contact with some of our accessibility experts if you'd like to pick their brains.

Brian


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Kevin Reeve <Kevin.Reeve@USU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:55 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

I am looking to see what Website accessibility you have at your institution.

Is there a person or group responsible to make sure your websites are accessible?

What is their role and authority?

Do they provide training?

How do you handle making sure academic online courses are accessible?

Who is responsible for that?



If you have something to share, even if you have struggled with these same questions/ideas,  I would like to hear about it.

Kevin Reeve
Utah State University.


P.S.  Looking forward to seeing many of you at EDUCAUSE.







********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Okay I have to brag…  this morning my department got the first ever award for website accessibility.  It was presented to us by UTEP's Center for Accommodations and Support Services (formerly Disabled Student Services).  Since we also manage the Assistive Technology Lab we are very aware of the needs of the students with disAbilities so make it a priority in our marketing.  Wherever there is a ALT tag or close-captioning is available, we use it.  After a while it becomes automatic.  Lots of people think that it is difficult to do when you use  content management system like we do, but it isn't. And we use YouTube which, though not perfect, helps with the close-captioning.  We just have to edit some. 

It is kind of like wearing a seatbelt, once you get in the habit you don't even realize you do it – right, Brian!  Sounds like you are the same there at Urbana.

I'll tell you what will get you in the habit – shadow one of your students for a day, then sit with them as they work in one of your labs.  I have learned so much and the students see that we really want to do better so they help us to help them. They will test software, review the text for bulletins before we send them out, and "read" our web pages before we open them to the public.

Next phrase on campus is truly making online courses accessible. This is not under our department, but we will probably be involved. 

Melanie T. Thomas   

Manager, Marketing & Communications

Information Resources & Planning

The University of Texas at El Paso

Office: 915-747-6825  

From: <Mertz>, Brian E <bmertz@ILLINOIS.EDU>
Reply-To: IT Comm Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:17 AM
To: IT Comm Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

Kevin,

IT accessibility has always been a major priority at Illinois. When I started here, it took me a little bit of time to adjust to thinking about accessibility when working on projects. Now it's impossible not to consider it with every project. For example, in my mind designing something in Flash is just wasting everyone's time.

On campus, we have the Disability Resources and Educational Services Division (DRES) that among many, many services offers the campus help with creating accessible digital resources. 

In addition, several staff members within our central IT organization are dedicated to making sure our content, web sites and services are accessible. They also consult with departments on accessibility issues.

This mini-site has been helpful to many people that have IT accessibility issues: http://itaccessibility.illinois.edu

And then there are regular training events, brown bags, speakers, etc all focused on accessibility hosted by DRES.

How we guarantee that services, apps and content from vendors are accessible is that we write accessibility evaluations into our RFP process, and accessibility requirements into our contract language. 

As for homegrown apps and services, at Illinois there is a culture and mindset fostered over many years that if the service isn't accessible, it really isn't a service ready to deploy to all of campus or to use for mission critical activities. 

That mindset really takes care of accessibility "enforcement" for us. When someone raises a concern that a service isn't accessible, service developers don't fight back against that evaluation, they get help from the evaluators to make the service accessible.

Even when we publish infographics, we try to include an accessible version of the data: https://www.cites.illinois.edu/news/2013/20130923-onesandzeros.html (the text version at the bottom)

An example of a homegrown service with dedication to accessibility is our eText service: https://etext.illinois.edu/features.html

The National Federation of the Blind commended us for that dedication to accessibility: 

I'd be happy to get you in contact with some of our accessibility experts if you'd like to pick their brains.

Brian


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Kevin Reeve <Kevin.Reeve@USU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:55 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

I am looking to see what Website accessibility you have at your institution.

Is there a person or group responsible to make sure your websites are accessible?

What is their role and authority?

Do they provide training?

How do you handle making sure academic online courses are accessible?

Who is responsible for that?



If you have something to share, even if you have struggled with these same questions/ideas,  I would like to hear about it.

Kevin Reeve
Utah State University.


P.S.  Looking forward to seeing many of you at EDUCAUSE.







********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thank you Melanie, Brian, Chuck and Scott for the information.  Very insightful, and Brian, love the simple website you have there for helping content and web developers. The best I have seen.  Appreciate each of your responses.  

We have been working through the GOALS project (offered through our WebAIM office here at USU) to come up with a plan.
What we do not have is someone responsible for web accessibility on our campus . We are struggling where to find a home for this initiative.   


Regards,

Kevin

Kevin L. Reeve |  Ph: 435.797.0783 |  kevin.reeve@usu.edu |
 | Information Technology @ Utah State University | 4420 Old Main Hill | Logan, UT 84322-4420 

From: "Thomas, Melanie" <melaniet@UTEP.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Mon, 7 Oct 2013 18:32:04 +0000
To: <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

Okay I have to brag…  this morning my department got the first ever award for website accessibility.  It was presented to us by UTEP's Center for Accommodations and Support Services (formerly Disabled Student Services).  Since we also manage the Assistive Technology Lab we are very aware of the needs of the students with disAbilities so make it a priority in our marketing.  Wherever there is a ALT tag or close-captioning is available, we use it.  After a while it becomes automatic.  Lots of people think that it is difficult to do when you use  content management system like we do, but it isn't. And we use YouTube which, though not perfect, helps with the close-captioning.  We just have to edit some. 

It is kind of like wearing a seatbelt, once you get in the habit you don't even realize you do it – right, Brian!  Sounds like you are the same there at Urbana.

I'll tell you what will get you in the habit – shadow one of your students for a day, then sit with them as they work in one of your labs.  I have learned so much and the students see that we really want to do better so they help us to help them. They will test software, review the text for bulletins before we send them out, and "read" our web pages before we open them to the public.

Next phrase on campus is truly making online courses accessible. This is not under our department, but we will probably be involved. 

Melanie T. Thomas   

Manager, Marketing & Communications

Information Resources & Planning

The University of Texas at El Paso

Office: 915-747-6825  

From: <Mertz>, Brian E <bmertz@ILLINOIS.EDU>
Reply-To: IT Comm Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:17 AM
To: IT Comm Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

Kevin,

IT accessibility has always been a major priority at Illinois. When I started here, it took me a little bit of time to adjust to thinking about accessibility when working on projects. Now it's impossible not to consider it with every project. For example, in my mind designing something in Flash is just wasting everyone's time.

On campus, we have the Disability Resources and Educational Services Division (DRES) that among many, many services offers the campus help with creating accessible digital resources. 

In addition, several staff members within our central IT organization are dedicated to making sure our content, web sites and services are accessible. They also consult with departments on accessibility issues.

This mini-site has been helpful to many people that have IT accessibility issues: http://itaccessibility.illinois.edu

And then there are regular training events, brown bags, speakers, etc all focused on accessibility hosted by DRES.

How we guarantee that services, apps and content from vendors are accessible is that we write accessibility evaluations into our RFP process, and accessibility requirements into our contract language. 

As for homegrown apps and services, at Illinois there is a culture and mindset fostered over many years that if the service isn't accessible, it really isn't a service ready to deploy to all of campus or to use for mission critical activities. 

That mindset really takes care of accessibility "enforcement" for us. When someone raises a concern that a service isn't accessible, service developers don't fight back against that evaluation, they get help from the evaluators to make the service accessible.

Even when we publish infographics, we try to include an accessible version of the data: https://www.cites.illinois.edu/news/2013/20130923-onesandzeros.html (the text version at the bottom)

An example of a homegrown service with dedication to accessibility is our eText service: https://etext.illinois.edu/features.html

The National Federation of the Blind commended us for that dedication to accessibility: 

I'd be happy to get you in contact with some of our accessibility experts if you'd like to pick their brains.

Brian


-- 

Brian Mertz

Senior Client Relationship Consultant

Campus Information Technologies and Informational Services (CITES)

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

bmertz@illinois.edu

twitter.com/cites 



From: Kevin Reeve <Kevin.Reeve@USU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE IT Communications Constituent Group Listserv <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Monday, October 7, 2013 9:55 AM
To: "ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <ITCOMM@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [ITCOMM] Website Accessibility oversight?

I am looking to see what Website accessibility you have at your institution.

Is there a person or group responsible to make sure your websites are accessible?

What is their role and authority?

Do they provide training?

How do you handle making sure academic online courses are accessible?

Who is responsible for that?



If you have something to share, even if you have struggled with these same questions/ideas,  I would like to hear about it.

Kevin Reeve
Utah State University.


P.S.  Looking forward to seeing many of you at EDUCAUSE.







********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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