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I highly agree with the “Involve all the staff” comment. Your initiative can’t be successful unless you include all perspectives. Here are a couple additional comments:

·         Not all changes are the same. Attached is a document that shows the different types of changes we have defined. These types have evolved a bit over the years. They work well for us, but you may need to define other types.

·         Also attaching an overview of our process just so you can see how it all fits together.

o   PLEASE NOTE: Most of the links in the attachments will not work for you because they go to our restricted Confluence wiki.

·         We are also using ServiceNow. We use the Change Management module to file, approve and report on Change Requests.

·         The more changes you have, the more you really need Change Management. Just looked at our numbers. In 2013 we had 1,745 changes filed. There is no way we could have done that without having this process in place.

 

It’s interesting to see all the comments about how other universities have implemented this process. Change Management has been in place here so long that everyone just takes it for granted. Seeing all these comments makes me remember the struggle it took to get it in place. All I can say is stick with it. It’s worth it!

 

Thelma

 

AttachmentSize
KU_IT_Change_Request_Types.pdf113.55 KB
KU_IT_Change_Management.pdf84.6 KB

Comments

We (Information Services at the UO) are in the process of designing and implementing a change management process. For those of you that have already implemented a change management process, what steps did you take during the implementation process to make sure everyone in your department understood (and accepted) the process? Did you provide training to staff? How did you ensure everyone was following the process?

Any information or recommendations that you can provide as we move through creating our change management process would be helpful!


Thank you!
Kelsey

---

Kelsey Lunsmann

Technology Service Desk Coordinator

Information Services | University of Oregon

541-346-8639

facebook.com/UOTechDesk | twitter.com/UOTechDesk

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

H Kelsey, We've recently completed a Change Management Initiative here at Tufts and we'd be happy to share. We enhanced our Change Management processes and integrated with ServiceNow, our ITSM tool. I've included a link below to some information on our process. If you or anyone else is interested in chatting about the details, please reach out directly. Thanks! :o) Kara http://go.tufts.edu/change #~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~# Kara Bilotta Service Measurement & Analysis Team Lead Tufts Technology Services (TTS) 617.627.5549 http://it.tufts.edu @TuftsTechnology | @KaraBilotta #~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~#~# From: Kelsey Lunsmann > Reply-To: "ITIL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Date: Friday, January 10, 2014 11:38 AM To: "ITIL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: [ITIL] Implementation of Change Management We (Information Services at the UO) are in the process of designing and implementing a change management process. For those of you that have already implemented a change management process, what steps did you take during the implementation process to make sure everyone in your department understood (and accepted) the process? Did you provide training to staff? How did you ensure everyone was following the process? Any information or recommendations that you can provide as we move through creating our change management process would be helpful! Thank you! Kelsey --- Kelsey Lunsmann Technology Service Desk Coordinator Information Services | University of Oregon 541-346-8639 facebook.com/UOTechDesk | twitter.com/UOTechDesk ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/. ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Kelsey,

We implemented Change Management processes in November at the University of Virginia and also use ServiceNow as our ITSM tool.  I would be happy to have a conversation highlighting what we did – feel free to reach out directly.

 

-Tracy

 

Tracy Smith

Director, Infrastructure Support Services, Administration and Help Services

University of Virginia

434-243-8678

 

 

 

We first created a Change Management request process in our LANDesk Service Desk ITSM system.  During the creation of the process I invited key staff (particularly Managers and Directors) from each team (Server, Networking, Desktop, Telecom, etc..) within IS&T and had them help develop and provide input to the Change Management process.  I then created a CM Process guide (a key to successful CM) and held a meeting and training with the support of our CIO.  We now hold CM meetings once a week and everyone is aware that all changes must get approved by our CAB group before implementation.  It has so far worked out very well.

 

Michelle Sypinero

Manager of Student Computing Services

Chapman University

sypinero@chapman.edu

714-628-7250

 

IS&T WILL NEVER ASK FOR YOUR PASSWORD - DO NOT SHARE YOUR PASSWORD WITH OTHERS!

 

Kelsey,

 

KU IT implemented Change Management about eight years ago (and Incident Management the following year). We initially did a half-day onsite ITIL overview for staff to get everyone familiar with ITIL terminology. We did several all-staff presentations, including a series of skits for Incident, Change and Problem management. The Change Management skit was based on a western with a little of “trouble right here in River City” from The Music Man thrown in for good measure. I still have the narrative for the skit, but unfortunately we didn’t record it.

 

Implementing a new process is a long, uphill battle. People resist change so you really need to be able to sell them on the benefits. Accountability is a huge issue. There need to be some consequences if they don’t follow the process, especially if an outage results from an unapproved change. After many years of implementation, our Change (and Incident) Management training is now mandatory for all new staff, even administrative staff who aren’t directly involved in the processes. I can easily share our training presentation if you want.

 

Feel free to give me a call if you want.

 

Thelma

 

Thelma Simons  | Project & Process Management Office | KU Information Technology 

The University of Kansas  |  1001 Sunnyside Drive  |  Lawrence KS  66045
Phone: 785.864.0269  |  Email: tsimons@ku.edu   |  Web: www.technology.ku.edu

 

Kelsey,

 

I implemented a change process at my last school and has been in place for about eight years or so.  It was driven by audit findings – changes taking place without proper documentation and reporting.  It took us about two years to get the process in place and then it became a continuous improvement project right after going into production.

 

I chaired the Change Review Committee (I was the Client Services manager) and we had members from each IT department represented.  We were a central IT shop of about 60 or so staff.   Everyone contributed to developing the process, definitions, criteria and steps.   I guided them through the ITIL best practices for change.

 

We started with spreadsheets and later progressed to a backend database and web form for change requests.  Meetings were every Tuesday and all changes were presented and reviewed.  Changes were either accepted or deferred (we did not reject changes as we felt that term was too negative).   

 

It was a lot of work, but now it is part of the culture. 

 

I would be happy to provide much more detail off-line.  Please let me know.

 

It was a labor of love;-)

 

AJS

--------------------------------------------------

Anthony J. Santucci, IT Project Manager

Office of the CIO

Information Technology Services

Appalachian State University, Boone, NC

 

Hi Kelsey:  We implemented change management at Lynn several years ago. Of course we are a small institution so change management for us may look different than in larger complex departments. We just finished our first revision and it has been a long process.  We started by gathering some requirements, defining type of changes and the steps we needed to control our changes. It took many meetings and discussions.  Then we used Footprints (our incident management system) and setup change management.  Couple things we learned in the way:

(1)     Start small.  Change management requires a big cultural change.  If it creates a huge overhead for staff they will revolt and will try to bypass the process.

(2)    Involve all the staff.  Listen what do they have to say.  What are the big problems you would like to address?  Coordinating resources?  Improving communication? Audit and record changes? If they see you are trying to help them and give them solutions to their concerns you will gain trust of the group and it will be easier to implement other requirements not so popular.

(3)    Our process required all documentation to be ready for the CM group to review and approve the change (step by step documents).  We realized than more often than not most changes are “scheduled” way in advanced (we are ruled by academic dates) but we have to wait to have all pieces together until few days before the change.  We would have to override CM decisions and the CM group felt powerless.  We changed that process to get staff to enter changes earlier and CM would work on it on a “pre-approved” status (they look at the type of change, resources, timeline, projects) so they would look at the changes in advance and discuss them. This is brand new so we are hoping this will be a positive change.

(4)    Keep it simple!  We loaded so much “wish list stuff”  at the beginning that we realized that a lot of that information created more overhead than anything. If it is not currently needed skip it. Start with the must pieces (you can always add them later).

(5)    It is a constant struggle!  Change Management is not pretty and creates overhead for anyone involved but is good practice. Keep it somehow flexible because nowadays we are required to be nimble.   At the end of the day we realized the best part of change management is to document and communicate what we changed and who,  so we could anticipate issues or fix problems in less time should they occur.  Our department has improved greatly after Change Management but you have to constantly sell it, people has to believe in it.   

(6)    When most people follow change management, the ones that do not are highly visible.  A little peer pressure works here.

 

Good Luck!  If you have questions, do not hesitate to PM me.

Regards,

 

Maria Piret

Director Information Systems

Lynn University

3601 N. Military Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561-237-7355

mpiret@lynn.edu

Google+ / LinkedIn

 

Please consider the environment before printing.

 

 

 

I highly agree with the “Involve all the staff” comment. Your initiative can’t be successful unless you include all perspectives. Here are a couple additional comments:

·         Not all changes are the same. Attached is a document that shows the different types of changes we have defined. These types have evolved a bit over the years. They work well for us, but you may need to define other types.

·         Also attaching an overview of our process just so you can see how it all fits together.

o   PLEASE NOTE: Most of the links in the attachments will not work for you because they go to our restricted Confluence wiki.

·         We are also using ServiceNow. We use the Change Management module to file, approve and report on Change Requests.

·         The more changes you have, the more you really need Change Management. Just looked at our numbers. In 2013 we had 1,745 changes filed. There is no way we could have done that without having this process in place.

 

It’s interesting to see all the comments about how other universities have implemented this process. Change Management has been in place here so long that everyone just takes it for granted. Seeing all these comments makes me remember the struggle it took to get it in place. All I can say is stick with it. It’s worth it!

 

Thelma

 

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