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Message from bob_koskovich@concordacademy.org

We are in the design phase of a major network infrastructure upgrade, including a move to VoIP (replacing our stone-age Avaya PBX).

Many years ago we dropped in-room landline phones for students due to (unsurprising) lack of use.

We still have POTS service to hall phones on each floor, a phone in the common room, and phones in faculty apartments.

Two mitigating factors are that we have terrible cell service (precluding reliable use of student/faculty cell phones for emergency calls) and we do not have generator-backed power in the dorms (so IP phones will die if power fails).

Obviously, the choices are to stick with POTS lines (for which I can provide generator-backed power from a central location), fix the cell reception, or fix the power situation.

The "what does everybody else do?" question has arisen, so I pose it to you:  What do you do, and/or what would you do differently?

Thanks as ever for sharing your collective wisdom!

--

Bob Koskovich
Director of Information Technology Services
Concord Academy - Concord, Mass.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from phoopes@standrews-de.org

The EDUCAUSE ACCESS Constituent Group Listserv on December 12, 2013 at 1:25 PM -0500 wrote: >We still have POTS service to hall phones on each floor, a phone in the >common room, and phones in faculty apartments. > > >Two mitigating factors are that we have terrible cell service (precluding >reliable use of student/faculty cell phones for emergency calls) and we >do not have generator-backed power in the dorms (so IP phones will die if >power fails). > > >Obviously, the choices are to stick with POTS lines (for which I can >provide generator-backed power from a central location), fix the cell >reception, or fix the power situation. We're in the exact same situation. Phone in common rooms, but not used much. Student cell phone in rooms with varying levels of cell signal available. Right now, we're not hearing of concerns with power. But at least you can feel better knowing you're not alone! ===================== Peter Hoopes Director of Information Services St. Andrew's School phoopes@standrews-de.org ===================== ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Message from mary@princetonfriendsschool.org

They will have to pry my copper lines out of my cold dead hands. Mary D’Amore Director of Technology and Information Services Princeton Friends School 470 Quaker Road Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 683-1194 X32 (609) 731-7255 cell www.princetonfriendsschool.org
I'd recommend working with various local and most-popular cell providers in your area for a low-cost wired/Wi-Fi back-haul "mini-access point(s)". In our area (central Maine) we have had two employees with bad cell service at home and one office (physical plant) with bad cell coverage inside the building. Verizon provided a $100 solution that connects to our IP network that imitates a local cell tower. Five bars for all phones for that carrier in that area now. Small IP network traffic hit when needed. Chris Rhoda Vice President for Information Services and CIO Thomas College http://www3.thomas.edu/chris/howtocontact.htm
Message from phoopes@standrews-de.org

The EDUCAUSE ACCESS Constituent Group Listserv on December 12, 2013 at 3:29 PM -0500 wrote: >I'd recommend working with various local and most-popular cell providers >in your area for a low-cost wired/Wi-Fi back-haul "mini-access point(s)". I would agree with this. Use we AT&T Microcells throughout campus that provide good coverage. The only issue is that you have to register the phones that can use them (up to 10), and they have to have GPS radio connections so they can verify they're in the US. Putting one in a basement might not work. For us, they've been lifesavers for locations with bad cell service. ===================== Peter Hoopes Director of Information Services St. Andrew's School phoopes@standrews-de.org ===================== ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Bob,

 

I would just cost this out over 6 years and see which plan is less expensive.  In addition, throw out the ones that are not desirable by your school and you. 

 

Clearly you can put in antenna extenders, backup UPS’s and even generators.  Certainly pursuing some options have an added benefit, but other drawbacks. 

 

I just think that this boils down to the first two sentences.

 

Thanks,

Jim

 

 

Message from bob_koskovich@concordacademy.org

We are in the design phase of a major network infrastructure upgrade, including a move to VoIP (replacing our stone-age Avaya PBX).

Many years ago we dropped in-room landline phones for students due to (unsurprising) lack of use.

We still have POTS service to hall phones on each floor, a phone in the common room, and phones in faculty apartments.

Two mitigating factors are that we have terrible cell service (precluding reliable use of student/faculty cell phones for emergency calls) and we do not have generator-backed power in the dorms (so IP phones will die if power fails).

Obviously, the choices are to stick with POTS lines (for which I can provide generator-backed power from a central location), fix the cell reception, or fix the power situation.

The "what does everybody else do?" question has arisen, so I pose it to you:  What do you do, and/or what would you do differently?

Thanks as ever for sharing your collective wisdom!

--

Bob Koskovich
Director of Information Technology Services
Concord Academy - Concord, Mass.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from phoopes@standrews-de.org

The EDUCAUSE ACCESS Constituent Group Listserv on December 12, 2013 at 1:25 PM -0500 wrote: >We still have POTS service to hall phones on each floor, a phone in the >common room, and phones in faculty apartments. > > >Two mitigating factors are that we have terrible cell service (precluding >reliable use of student/faculty cell phones for emergency calls) and we >do not have generator-backed power in the dorms (so IP phones will die if >power fails). > > >Obviously, the choices are to stick with POTS lines (for which I can >provide generator-backed power from a central location), fix the cell >reception, or fix the power situation. We're in the exact same situation. Phone in common rooms, but not used much. Student cell phone in rooms with varying levels of cell signal available. Right now, we're not hearing of concerns with power. But at least you can feel better knowing you're not alone! ===================== Peter Hoopes Director of Information Services St. Andrew's School phoopes@standrews-de.org ===================== ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
Message from mary@princetonfriendsschool.org

They will have to pry my copper lines out of my cold dead hands. Mary D’Amore Director of Technology and Information Services Princeton Friends School 470 Quaker Road Princeton, NJ 08540 (609) 683-1194 X32 (609) 731-7255 cell www.princetonfriendsschool.org
I'd recommend working with various local and most-popular cell providers in your area for a low-cost wired/Wi-Fi back-haul "mini-access point(s)". In our area (central Maine) we have had two employees with bad cell service at home and one office (physical plant) with bad cell coverage inside the building. Verizon provided a $100 solution that connects to our IP network that imitates a local cell tower. Five bars for all phones for that carrier in that area now. Small IP network traffic hit when needed. Chris Rhoda Vice President for Information Services and CIO Thomas College http://www3.thomas.edu/chris/howtocontact.htm
Message from phoopes@standrews-de.org

The EDUCAUSE ACCESS Constituent Group Listserv on December 12, 2013 at 3:29 PM -0500 wrote: >I'd recommend working with various local and most-popular cell providers >in your area for a low-cost wired/Wi-Fi back-haul "mini-access point(s)". I would agree with this. Use we AT&T Microcells throughout campus that provide good coverage. The only issue is that you have to register the phones that can use them (up to 10), and they have to have GPS radio connections so they can verify they're in the US. Putting one in a basement might not work. For us, they've been lifesavers for locations with bad cell service. ===================== Peter Hoopes Director of Information Services St. Andrew's School phoopes@standrews-de.org ===================== ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Bob,

 

I would just cost this out over 6 years and see which plan is less expensive.  In addition, throw out the ones that are not desirable by your school and you. 

 

Clearly you can put in antenna extenders, backup UPS’s and even generators.  Certainly pursuing some options have an added benefit, but other drawbacks. 

 

I just think that this boils down to the first two sentences.

 

Thanks,

Jim

 

 

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