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We are a small University of approximately 1,000 students.  The administration made it a  requirement last year for all students, that they own a laptop due to the number of online resources that are required for coursework and their need to access our D2L Learning Management System when not in class.  Last year we tried a laptop loaner program for those students who had financial difficulties and did not own a laptop.  We also did some work with our Financial Aid office to come up with some creative solutions.

 

At the end of the year we quickly realized that the laptop loaner program does not work.  Is there anyone out there offering similar programs or who have come up with creative solutions to address this problem?

 

What do you do if one of your students come to your institution but does not own a laptop?  Any advice or comments would be appreciated.

 

Thank you,

 

 

Monte Schmeiser

Director of Institutional Technology

Tel: (310)-303-7684

 

 

PLEASE NOTE MY NEW EMAIL ADDRESS:

mschmeiser@marymountcalifornia.edu

 


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Comments

Do you have any computer labs on campus?

 

Thanks!

 

 

Kent Corser | Director, IT Technical and Client Operations

Main 800.755.5200   |  Fax 785.242.0182
Direct 785.248.2494  |  OU Help 855.268.4357


www.ottawa.edu | kent.corser@ottawa.edu

 

We only have one lab on our main campus.

 

Message from jcoehoorn@york.edu

Are these residential students? If so, I suggest a few public stations in your residence halls. We' have two like this in the public area of each of our nicer student apartment halls:


They mount directly to the back of a monitor, connect to our wifi rather than a wired port. They have kensington locks and are in view of the lobby security cameras. HP also has machines in a similar form factor. The wifi means it's pretty easy to set up, and it'll sure be a far cry cheaper than supporting another full lab or a laptop program.


Joel Coehoorn
Director of Information Technology
York College, Nebraska
402.363.5603
jcoehoorn@york.edu

 

The mission of York College is to transform lives through Christ-centered education and to equip students for lifelong service to God, family, and society



I'll echo the point about equipping public computer labs.  As students started to bring computers to college there was an intuitive idea that we no longer had to provide such labs.  Intuitive, but wrong: nearly all of our students bring computers, and our labs have never been busier.  BYOD is not the money-saving panacea it was once thought to be. 

Cordially,
David

_________________________________________________________________________
David W. Sisk, PhD   Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services
Macalester College      /      1600 Grand Avenue      /       Saint Paul, Minnesota  55105-1899
http://its-notices-alerts.blogspot.com/                  Voice (651) 696-6745,  FAX (651) 696-6778


Message from jvelco@jmls.edu

I think another concern is support. Does the school provide support on school provided laptops? What level? What kind of support can students who own their own laptops expect? This type of support will require resources and budget, has this been taken into consideration? James Velco Chief Technology Officer The John Marshall Law School jvelco@jmls.edu On Oct 24, 2013, at 8:03 AM, "David Sisk" > wrote: I'll echo the point about equipping public computer labs. As students started to bring computers to college there was an intuitive idea that we no longer had to provide such labs. Intuitive, but wrong: nearly all of our students bring computers, and our labs have never been busier. BYOD is not the money-saving panacea it was once thought to be. Cordially, David _________________________________________________________________________ David W. Sisk, PhD Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services Macalester College / 1600 Grand Avenue / Saint Paul, Minnesota 55105-1899 http://its-notices-alerts.blogspot.com/ Voice (651) 696-6745, FAX (651) 696-6778
Yes, we realize that support is an issue. I am ready to push back and simply discontinue any kind of laptop program, loaner program, etc. I was simply wondering if there were other institutions out there that had anything like this. It sounds like most are basically saying you're on your own, but if you need access to online resources, use our labs. Which is the model that I would like to stick with. Do any of you have situations where a department will request a laptop for one their people to go to a conference with. We get those kind of requests as well. It's not like we just keep spare laptops around for departments or divisions to borrow when they need them. I think this is something they need to invest in for their division or department. Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it. Monte -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Small College Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:SMALLCOL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Velco, Jim Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 9:58 AM To: SMALLCOL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [SMALLCOL] Laptop Programs I think another concern is support. Does the school provide support on school provided laptops? What level? What kind of support can students who own their own laptops expect? This type of support will require resources and budget, has this been taken into consideration? James Velco Chief Technology Officer The John Marshall Law School jvelco@jmls.edu On Oct 24, 2013, at 8:03 AM, "David Sisk" > wrote: I'll echo the point about equipping public computer labs. As students started to bring computers to college there was an intuitive idea that we no longer had to provide such labs. Intuitive, but wrong: nearly all of our students bring computers, and our labs have never been busier. BYOD is not the money-saving panacea it was once thought to be. Cordially, David _________________________________________________________________________ David W. Sisk, PhD Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services Macalester College / 1600 Grand Avenue / Saint Paul, Minnesota 55105-1899 http://its-notices-alerts.blogspot.com/ Voice (651) 696-6745, FAX (651) 696-6778
We don't require our students to bring a laptop but it's highly recommended. However, we expect students to bring systems that meet our recommended system requirements. I'd say that more than 98% of our students bring laptops. We partnered with two vendors that offer reduced pricing on computer systems to Washington College students. Though students can purchase their computer from any vendor. Students who do not bring a computer to campus can use the computers in the Library or other public access locations. We have a laptop loaner program that's primarily for staff and faculty. They usually borrow a laptop to take to conferences. We will lend a laptop to a student provided a faculty member agrees to take responsibility for the laptop. Since Washington College is centrally isolated, we provide computer repair for student and Washington College owned systems. Our technicians have the necessary certifications to repair warranty Apple and Lenovo computers. They can also repair any non warranty system. We charge a small fee for hardware repairs plus the cost of parts. This seems to work for us. __________ Sharon Sledge Assoc. CIO, Academic Computing and Support Services Washington College 300 Washington Avenue Chestertown, MD 21620 Office: 410-810-7450 ----- Original Message ----- From: "Monte Schmeiser" To: SMALLCOL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 1:42:25 PM Subject: Re: [SMALLCOL] Laptop Programs Yes, we realize that support is an issue. I am ready to push back and simply discontinue any kind of laptop program, loaner program, etc. I was simply wondering if there were other institutions out there that had anything like this. It sounds like most are basically saying you're on your own, but if you need access to online resources, use our labs. Which is the model that I would like to stick with. Do any of you have situations where a department will request a laptop for one their people to go to a conference with. We get those kind of requests as well. It's not like we just keep spare laptops around for departments or divisions to borrow when they need them. I think this is something they need to invest in for their division or department. Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it. Monte -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Small College Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:SMALLCOL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Velco, Jim Sent: Thursday, October 24, 2013 9:58 AM To: SMALLCOL@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [SMALLCOL] Laptop Programs I think another concern is support. Does the school provide support on school provided laptops? What level? What kind of support can students who own their own laptops expect? This type of support will require resources and budget, has this been taken into consideration? James Velco Chief Technology Officer The John Marshall Law School jvelco@jmls.edu On Oct 24, 2013, at 8:03 AM, "David Sisk" > wrote: I'll echo the point about equipping public computer labs. As students started to bring computers to college there was an intuitive idea that we no longer had to provide such labs. Intuitive, but wrong: nearly all of our students bring computers, and our labs have never been busier. BYOD is not the money-saving panacea it was once thought to be. Cordially, David _________________________________________________________________________ David W. Sisk, PhD Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services Macalester College / 1600 Grand Avenue / Saint Paul, Minnesota 55105-1899 http://its-notices-alerts.blogspot.com/ Voice (651) 696-6745, FAX (651) 696-6778
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