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Colleagues,

 

Good morning!  I just returned from yet another exhilarating EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in Anaheim.  It is always good to see old friends and colleagues as well as meeting new ones.  The keynote speakers were awesome.   Going to Anaheim was a nostalgic return to my beginnings in higher education as I attended my first EDUCAUSE Annual Conference in 2008 in Anaheim.  I remember the overwhelming experience of the size and scope of the conference and wondering how to best navigate each day.  I remember walking around in complete anonymity without very many professional or personal connections.  Today, 5 years later, I’m thankful to have such a rich, vast, and diverse group of friends and colleagues in higher education IT that I often can’t attend sessions because of the impromptu conversations which occur throughout the day.

 

As I walked through halls each day I couldn’t help but think about Diversity.  I wondered how diverse are we as a community?  I wondered if we more diverse in 2013 than we were when I entered higher education in 2008.  I wondered how diverse is our leadership pipeline.  I wondered what we looked like at various career levels (i.e. from entry to CIO). I wondered what the demographics of the several thousand attendees would look like.  I wondered what if EDUCAUSE were to ask folks to disclose demographic information which would be used in the aggregate to start a dialogue about diversity.  I wondered if the data from collecting demographic information could be shared via conference website or via their mobile app.  I wonder what we could do about educating others and improving our diversity efforts if we had a data and a platform to share/discuss ideas. 

 

What are your thoughts about diversity?  Am I off base?  Love to hear from you.!     

 

 

- Mac -

 

Keith W. McIntosh, MBA
Vice Chancellor for Information Technology

and Chief Information Officer (CIO)

-------------------------------------------------------
Information Technology
Pima County Community College District
kwmcintosh@pima.edu

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion listserv can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Keith and all—

 

We are wrapping up the ECAR 2013 Workforce Report, which doesn’t have a lot to show about diversity.  We did see a slight increase in diversity of CIOs, but it could be due to sampling error (variation from the last survey’s sample to this one). Also, Wayne Brown’s CHECS survey has not shown much change in diversity of CIOs.  So I don’t think we have much evidence of change.

 

At levels other than the CIO, we also don’t see a lot of change, but I’m wary of response bias in the IT staff who respond to our survey.  In other words, are the IT staff who respond to our survey just like the IT staff who don’t respond? This is always a problem in voluntary surveys, but I’m especially concerned about it for demographics.  We do see more diversity among IT staff than among CIOs.  That could be good for the pipeline!

 

We do ask about some demographics in our EDUCAUSE profiles, but we find that many people leave these fields blank, so we aren’t able to use them for research purposes. 

 

I’m ALL for getting more and better data on this, so I’m anxious to hear any ideas this group may bubble up for what is needed and what they would be willing to share with EDUCAUSE for research purposes.  We do understand the sensitive nature of this kind of information and that both individuals and institutions will need transparency on how this information will (or won’t) be used.

 

Pam

 

Pam Arroway Senior Statistician

EDUCAUSE
Uncommon Thinking for the Common Good
direct: 303.544.5678 | main: 303.449.4430 | educause.edu

 

 

 

 

Keith and all…

I agree that data and some research would be helpful and could inform us of the real story of where we are rather just anecdotal. However I would propose again that we have a real conversation about climate, how diverse can we be if we do not create a climate that embraces the diversity we are giving lip service to?

 

I have a tremendous passion for this discussion, not only in diversifying our workforce but in understanding and embracing the concepts of technology being the answer to bridging the gap for our underserved and marginalized students. What we do can be the difference, to this end I have linked arms with our Vice President of Diversity to seek out and implement solutions that will reach this goal.  If the CIO’s in higher ed really want to have this conversation then we have some work to do amongst ourselves.

 

I attended NCORE, the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity for Higher Ed in New Orleans last May and had my eyes opened wide, we do not  live in a post-racist society, consequently I was the only CIO in attendance. Last week our VP of Diversity attended Educause with me, I am pretty sure she was the only CDO there. At the very first session we attended together, Sir Ken’s keynote, I saw clearly that we are not ready to have this conversation.  We found our seats in a row where we had to get past the two people sitting on the end, when my colleague arrived to take her seat on my right she was denied access by the fine white middle aged gentleman who said the seat between him and I, on my left was saved. I had to assure him that I had a seat on my right that we had saved for her and it would be ok to let her through…..this my friends a classic example of a micro-aggression. And just in case you are curious, no one showed up to take that seat he was saving.  If we want to have this conversation, can we be honest about the climate we are creating?

 

I am more than happy to help in any way I can but I want this to have meaning and create results….

 

 

 

Cheers,

Russ

 

 

Russell Beard

Vice President of Information Resources

Phone: 425.564.4201

 

 

Russ,

 

I appreciate your comments.  I think the data and conversation go hand in hand.  I think we should do both.  I follow NCORE on Facebook.  I’m glad you got to attend.   We started the dialogue during last year’s EDUCAUSE Annual Conference.  There were several sessions on diversity.  What work do you think we need to do as CIO’s? or as a community as a whole?   What results would you like to see?  Do you think the situation which happened to you and your friend (your CDO) is pervasive or was this an isolated incident?  We can do better, we should do better, but what does that mean?  What does that look like? 

 

 

- Mac -

 

Keith W. McIntosh, MBA
Vice Chancellor for Information Technology

and Chief Information Officer (CIO)

-------------------------------------------------------
Information Technology
Pima County Community College District
kwmcintosh@pima.edu

 

A useful and informative discussion, and one which many open source communities are also beginning to grapple with. Code 2040 ( http://code2040.org/ ) has done sterling work arranging fellowships to support industry placements for underrepresented minorities. They have also worked with a range of Open Source Projects and Communities to foster engagement in such programs as Google Summer of Code. Perhaps they could be encouraged to present at Educause, and other events? Small steps. Best Ian -- Ian Dolphin Executive Director, Apereo Foundation ian.dolphin@apereo.org www.apereo.org On 24 Oct 2013, at 17:54, Russ Beard wrote: > Keith and all… > I agree that data and some research would be helpful and could inform us of the real story of where we are rather just anecdotal. However I would propose again that we have a real conversation about climate, how diverse can we be if we do not create a climate that embraces the diversity we are giving lip service to? > > I have a tremendous passion for this discussion, not only in diversifying our workforce but in understanding and embracing the concepts of technology being the answer to bridging the gap for our underserved and marginalized students. What we do can be the difference, to this end I have linked arms with our Vice President of Diversity to seek out and implement solutions that will reach this goal. If the CIO’s in higher ed really want to have this conversation then we have some work to do amongst ourselves. > > I attended NCORE, the National Conference on Race and Ethnicity for Higher Ed in New Orleans last May and had my eyes opened wide, we donot live in a post-racist society, consequently I was the only CIO in attendance. Last week our VP of Diversity attended Educause with me, I am pretty sure she was the only CDO there. At the very first session we attended together, Sir Ken’s keynote, I saw clearly that we are not ready to have this conversation. We found our seats in a row where we had to get past the two people sitting on the end, when my colleague arrived to take her seat on my right she was denied access by the fine white middle aged gentleman who said the seat between him and I, on my left was saved. I had to assure him that I had a seat on my right that we had saved for her and it would be ok to let her through…..this my friends a classic example of a micro-aggression. And just in case you are curious, no one showed up to take that seat he was saving. If we want to have this conversation, can we be honest about the climate we are creating? > > I am more than happy to help in any way I can but I want this to have meaning and create results…. > > > > Cheers, > Russ > > > Russell Beard > Vice President of Information Resources > Phone: 425.564.4201 > > > >
Ian, Thanks for sharing. I will share this with my sister, a African-American, junior computer engineering student at Auburn University. - Mac -   Keith W. McIntosh, MBA Vice Chancellor for Information Technology and Chief Information Officer (CIO) ------------------------------------------------------- Information Technology Pima County Community College District kwmcintosh@pima.edu
Ian, I read an article about the founder of Code 2040 last week. It would be nice to see more regional initiatives such as Code 2040 started across the country targeting programs with high numbers of underrepresented minorities. And I agree, small steps in the right direction will still get you to your goal. Germaine Henderson Manager, Application Architecture

Keith

I totally agree that we should do both, I am all about good data. I went to several of the sessions last year regarding diversity and it was a great start, a great start. What I saw was a good discussion about finding ways to bring more women to the IT work space and that is a good start but I almost sensed a fear of bringing up race and we can’t be serious about this unless we talk about race.  

 

I am a middle aged white male and my revelation was discovering my role in this discussion.  CIO’s have a role in leading the conversation, we have a place at the table where the decisions are made. We can advocate for solutions that bridge the gap. We cannot have that conversation if we aren’t informed and I would love to see this constituent group help with educating  at Educause about the tools that can bridge the gaps and about how to have these difficult conversations.

 

I honestly can’t say if my situation was isolated or not but my experience has been that if that behavior is displayed that openly by one, chances are there are more. I brought that up simply as an illustration of the work that is yet to be done.  We all have to take responsibility for what exists in our society. We may have not created the situation but if we don’t raise a voice and lend a hand we might as well have.

 

Thank you Keith for asking the questions, this how good things begin…

 

Cheers,

Russ

 

Pam,

 

I look forward to ECAR’s 2013 Workforce Report.  I agree that Dr. Brown’s work on the Center for Higher Education CIO Studies (CHECS) hasn’t shown much change in CIO diversity.   CHECS has done a good job capturing and reporting this information. Wouldn’t it be good to have better insight into our diversity numbers and types at all levels?

 

 

- Mac -

 

Keith W. McIntosh, MBA
Vice Chancellor for Information Technology

and Chief Information Officer (CIO)

-------------------------------------------------------
Information Technology
Pima County Community College District
kwmcintosh@pima.edu

 

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