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We have a single SAN environment where all data is co-mingled.  I am wondering how many other Universities have taken steps to separate their data logically or physically so addition security can be added to data with higher sensitivity ratings?  I would be interested in learning what others have implemented to apply appropriate data handling procedures to their data at rest.

 

Thanks,

 

Bryan McLaughlin

Information Security Officer

Creighton University

bmclaughlin@creighton.edu

 

Security Tip: No matter how authentic the request appears, if you are asked in an email or via the phone to provide your password - it is a SCAM.

 

Comments

I've heard the argument two ways:
 
1) Attempting to secure ALL data at the same high level is futile, and
2) Applying different levels of security to different data classifications leaves high security data open to disclosure if incorrectly classified, or provides an unexpected back door to climb upwards in the system.
 
In my personal opinion, lock it all down at the highest security level and sleep better at night.
 
Bob
 

 
 
Robert E. Meyers,  Ms.Ed.
Educational Program Manager
  Office of Information Security
West Virginia University
office: (304) 293-8502
remeyers@mail.wvu.edu


>>> On Monday, February 06, 2012 at 2:15 PM, "McLaughlin, Bryan S." <bmclaughlin@CREIGHTON.EDU> wrote:

We have a single SAN environment where all data is co-mingled.  I am wondering how many other Universities have taken steps to separate their data logically or physically so addition security can be added to data with higher sensitivity ratings?  I would be interested in learning what others have implemented to apply appropriate data handling procedures to their data at rest.

 

Thanks,

 

Bryan McLaughlin

Information Security Officer

Creighton University

bmclaughlin@creighton.edu

 

Security Tip: No matter how authentic the request appears, if you are asked in an email or via the phone to provide your password - it is a SCAM.

 

Sorry…..but, to me that sounds like too much of a shotgun approach.  I’d be hard pressed to equate the lunch menu from the cafeteria to someone’s social security number on a form.  I’ve always felt that there has to be some varying levels of protection, but mixed in with some sense of reality and commonsense…..protecting data usually comes back to having a clear definition of your protections required on specific data classifications – and making sure that the users are clear on what those definitions mean to them and their business unit – and then giving them the technological means of meeting your policy requirements….

 

Protect the SSN…..don’t worry about the lunch menu…..;-)

 

Just my $.02…..

 

M