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When a user reports a phish message with a "click here" link that goes to a google doc, it's easy to submit an abuse notice using the link at the bottom of the doc form.  If a webserver is compromised, the phisher may install a SourceForge phpformgenerator.  I've found in several instances that you can go to the first level directory in the link to the form and see the phpformgenerator management screen.  And it often lets anyone who sees the page delete any of the forms created by the formgenerator.  That at least temporarily disables the mischief while I contact the site owner to check for the compromise.

Bob Bayn          (435)797-2396            IT Security Team
       http://it.usu.edu/security/htm/dont-be-fooled
Office of Information Technology, Utah State University


Comments

Message from aperry@murraystate.edu

Bob,
I'd be curious as to the legal implications of making changes to an external server you do not control, even if it were suspected to be compromised. Unauthorized access of a computer system can be interpreted many different ways in different jurisdictions. As an alternative, I'd recommend a quick call to your firewall admin (who may also be you) to temporarily block access from your campus to the offending system while you investigate with the owner. That doesn't protect your remote users, but it may be the safer choice from a legal stance.

Drew Perry
Security Analyst
Murray State University
(270) 809-4414
aperry@murraystate.edu

P  Save a tree. Please consider the environment before printing this message.



Message from mmaloney@middlesexcc.edu

This is especially true if the website becomes subject of an investigation because it was compromised.   I know I wouldn’t want my IP address being shown as poking around and deleting files.

 

I do like Drew suggests, I block the ability for our users to get to them while on campus, and I watch our logs to see if anyone has clicked on the link from within the web based mail. 

 

Mike

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Security Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Drew Perry
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 12:10 PM
To: SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [SECURITY] disabling some phishing forms

 

Bob,

I'd be curious as to the legal implications of making changes to an external server you do not control, even if it were suspected to be compromised. Unauthorized access of a computer system can be interpreted many different ways in different jurisdictions. As an alternative, I'd recommend a quick call to your firewall admin (who may also be you) to temporarily block access from your campus to the offending system while you investigate with the owner. That doesn't protect your remote users, but it may be the safer choice from a legal stance.


Drew Perry
Security Analyst
Murray State University
(270) 809-4414
aperry@murraystate.edu

 

P  Save a tree. Please consider the environment before printing this message.



Thanks, Mike and Drew, for the reality check.  I'll stick with the local block and let victims at other places fend for themselves.  Sometimes you can (should) do only so much.

Bob Bayn          (435)797-2396            IT Security Team
       http://it.usu.edu/security/htm/dont-be-fooled
Office of Information Technology, Utah State University


From: The EDUCAUSE Security Constituent Group Listserv [SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] on behalf of Maloney, Michael [mmaloney@MIDDLESEXCC.EDU]
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 11:48 AM
To: SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [SECURITY] disabling some phishing forms

This is especially true if the website becomes subject of an investigation because it was compromised.   I know I wouldn’t want my IP address being shown as poking around and deleting files.

 

I do like Drew suggests, I block the ability for our users to get to them while on campus, and I watch our logs to see if anyone has clicked on the link from within the web based mail. 

 

Mike

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Security Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Drew Perry
Sent: Thursday, January 19, 2012 12:10 PM
To: SECURITY@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [SECURITY] disabling some phishing forms

 

Bob,

I'd be curious as to the legal implications of making changes to an external server you do not control, even if it were suspected to be compromised. Unauthorized access of a computer system can be interpreted many different ways in different jurisdictions. As an alternative, I'd recommend a quick call to your firewall admin (who may also be you) to temporarily block access from your campus to the offending system while you investigate with the owner. That doesn't protect your remote users, but it may be the safer choice from a legal stance.


Drew Perry
Security Analyst
Murray State University
(270) 809-4414
aperry@murraystate.edu

 

P  Save a tree. Please consider the environment before printing this message.



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