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From the Aug. 15 issue of Crypto-Gram, with an appended update. ========================================================= Yet Another Risk of Storing Everything in the Cloud A hacker can social-engineer his way into your cloud storage and delete everything you have. It turns out, a billing address and the last four digits of a credit card number are the only two pieces of information anyone needs to get into your iCloud account. Once supplied, Apple will issue a temporary password, and that password grants access to iCloud. Apple tech support confirmed to me twice over the weekend that all you need to access someone's AppleID is the associated e-mail address, a credit card number, the billing address, and the last four digits of a credit card on file. Here's how a hacker gets that information. First you call Amazon and tell them you are the account holder, and want to add a credit card number to the account. All you need is the name on the account, an associated e-mail address, and the billing address. Amazon then allows you to input a new credit card. (Wired used a bogus credit card number from a website that generates fake card numbers that conform with the industry's published self-check algorithm.) Then you hang up. Next you call back, and tell Amazon that you've lost access to your account. Upon providing a name, billing address, and the new credit card number you gave the company on the prior call, Amazon will allow you to add a new e-mail address to the account. From here, you go to the Amazon website, and send a password reset to the new e-mail account. This allows you to see all the credit cards on file for the account -- not the complete numbers, just the last four digits. But, as we know, Apple only needs those last four digits. We asked Amazon to comment on its security policy, but didn't have anything to share by press time. And it's also worth noting that one wouldn't have to call Amazon to pull this off. Your pizza guy could do the same thing, for example. If you have an AppleID, every time you call Pizza Hut, you're giving the 16-year-old on the other end of the line all he needs to take over your entire digital life. The victim here is a popular technology journalist, so he got a level of tech support that's not available to most of us. I believe this will increasingly become a problem, and that cloud providers will need better and more automated solutions. http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/08/apple-amazon-mat-honan-hacking/all/ or http://tinyurl.com/c2ao8ur The victim's initial post: http://www.emptyage.com/post/28679875595/yes-i-was-hacked-hard Update: Apple has changed its policy and stopped taking phone-based password reset requests, pretty much as a result of this incident, and has beefed up security: http://www.networkworld.com/news/2012/080812-apple-stops-password-resets... or http://tinyurl.com/9h7bn42 -- Martin Manjak CISSP, GIAC GSEC-G Information Security Officer University at Albany MSC 209 518/437-3813 The University at Albany will never ask you to reveal your password. Please ignore all such requests.