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Message from ken.udas@gmail.com

Hello Openness colleagues.  I just posted a little post (http://bit.ly/ZJXeOn) in which I poked at the idea of creating some clarity (I hope not purity) in the larger community regarding MOOCs and Openness. As a point of intellectual honesty and truth in labeling, I thought that it might be worth at least considering removing “Open” from Coursera type courses and replacing it with “Fee Free.” MOOCs become MFFOCs (Massive Fee Free Online Courses), and the notion of Openness is respected and its definition is acknowledged.

Although this might seem a bit trivial, I do think that there is a lot in a name and I agree with others on this list who have pointed out the negative trend of "openwashing."  Maybe it's too late.


Just a thought.

Cheers -Ken

--
A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill. 

-Newman, John Henry


Latent Pattern Transmission

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Hey Ken,

Great post. I've been trying to open up a conversation on this dual nature of "openness" (or even the total misconception of the concept?) over at the MOOC constituent group http://www.educause.edu/discuss/teaching-and-learning/massive-open-online-courses-moocs-constituent-group. Feel free to cross-post over there!

// Jason


--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu

From: Ken Udas <ken.udas@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE OPENNESS Constituent Group Listserv <OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [OPENNESS] Massive Fee Free Online Courses?

Hello Openness colleagues.  I just posted a little post (http://bit.ly/ZJXeOn) in which I poked at the idea of creating some clarity (I hope not purity) in the larger community regarding MOOCs and Openness. As a point of intellectual honesty and truth in labeling, I thought that it might be worth at least considering removing “Open” from Coursera type courses and replacing it with “Fee Free.” MOOCs become MFFOCs (Massive Fee Free Online Courses), and the notion of Openness is respected and its definition is acknowledged.

Although this might seem a bit trivial, I do think that there is a lot in a name and I agree with others on this list who have pointed out the negative trend of "openwashing."  Maybe it's too late.


Just a thought.

Cheers -Ken

--
A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill. 

-Newman, John Henry


Latent Pattern Transmission

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from ken.udas@gmail.com

Hello Openness (and MOOC) colleagues.  I am cross posting this from the Openness CG, pardon any double messages.

I just posted a little post (http://bit.ly/ZJXeOn) in which I poked at the idea of creating some clarity (I hope not purity) in the larger community regarding MOOCs and Openness. As a point of intellectual honesty and truth in labeling, I thought that it might be worth at least considering removing “Open” from Coursera type courses and replacing it with “Fee Free.” MOOCs become MFFOCs (Massive Fee Free Online Courses), and the notion of Openness is respected and its definition is acknowledged.


Although this might seem a bit trivial, I do think that there is a lot in a name and I agree with others on this list who have pointed out the negative trend of "openwashing."  Maybe it's too late.


Just a thought.

Cheers -Ken

--
A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill. 

-Newman, John Henry


Latent Pattern Transmission





********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I like your classification here, Ken. There seems to be some chatter within the edu community about this dichotomy, but, sadly, the major media coverage really hasn't talked about it much. Which is extra frustrating considering the fact that MOOCs have their origin more in this "Free Cultural Works" sense of "open."

As you point out, eyes are on the business models to see how Coursera and others will react (or not) to this. Plus, unfortunately, 'MFFOC' don't really have the same ring to it, huh?

I thought of this the other day when I wanted to share information with a colleague about Behavior Drive Design, which was covered in the EdX SaaS course. Since that course (and maybe the whole platform?) uses YouTube videos, I was able to email them just direct link to the one relevant video. Although this is a pretty unsophisticated, it is this kind of remix that would have real value across all education institutions and endeavors. It's easy to realize how much we take this for granted when we try to do the same with a Coursera video, and cannot share or remix the content stuck in a closed system.

// Jason


--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu

From: Ken Udas <ken.udas@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: "The EDUCAUSE Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Constituent Group Listserv" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [MOOCS] Massive Fee Free Online Courses?

Hello Openness (and MOOC) colleagues.  I am cross posting this from the Openness CG, pardon any double messages.

I just posted a little post (http://bit.ly/ZJXeOn) in which I poked at the idea of creating some clarity (I hope not purity) in the larger community regarding MOOCs and Openness. As a point of intellectual honesty and truth in labeling, I thought that it might be worth at least considering removing “Open” from Coursera type courses and replacing it with “Fee Free.” MOOCs become MFFOCs (Massive Fee Free Online Courses), and the notion of Openness is respected and its definition is acknowledged.


Although this might seem a bit trivial, I do think that there is a lot in a name and I agree with others on this list who have pointed out the negative trend of "openwashing."  Maybe it's too late.


Just a thought.

Cheers -Ken

--
A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill. 

-Newman, John Henry


Latent Pattern Transmission





********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I think there is already something like Massive Fee Free Online Courses (or at least an acronym for it anyway) that is driving MOOC adoption/development. I believe it is something like Free Open Massive Online, or FOMO. Yeah I think there is a lot of FOMO going on with campuses looking at MOOC's already. Hmmm, maybe FOMO is something else? || |||| ||| || | | || ||| || ||| || | | ||| || ||| || Patrick Masson Chief Technology Officer, UMassOnline The University of Massachusetts, Office of the President 333 South St., Suite 400, Shrewsbury, MA 01545 (774) 455-7615: Office (774) 455-7620: Fax (970) 4MASSON: GoogleVoice UMOLPatMasson: AIM massonpj: Skype Web Site: http://www.umassonline.net Blog: http://www.umassonlineblog.com ________________________________________
Message from mackintosh.wayne@gmail.com

Hi Ken,

Copy of my comment posted on your blog:

I'm enjoying reading Latent Pattern Recognition. A welcome addition to the discourse. The interface or overlap which I'm finding quite intriguing is mixing the financial model with radical openness to build new value. Within the publicly funded higher education system:

Free learning plus open source content plus credible credentials is the game changer for formal education. It shifts the question from how to achieve sustainable OER projects to how will your publicly funded institution remain sustainable without OER? Moreover, its not that hard to achieve :-)

I think there's also a low-hanging fruit factor, too, which is how we talk about accessibility at our institution: "Here are a few things that are easy to do (just as easy as doing it the wrong way), and when you do it this other, easy way, your content conforms to usability and accessibility requirements."

In terms of open content, we just need to nail down the platforms and processes so that we can say: "Here are a few things that are easy to do (just as easy as doing it the closed way), and when you do it in this other, easy way, you can make your content open."

In other words, lowering the barriers to openness that makes it easy to be open "by default."

// Jason


--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu

From: Wayne Mackintosh <mackintosh.wayne@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE OPENNESS Constituent Group Listserv <OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <OPENNESS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [OPENNESS] Massive Fee Free Online Courses?

Hi Ken,

Copy of my comment posted on your blog:

I'm enjoying reading Latent Pattern Recognition. A welcome addition to the discourse. The interface or overlap which I'm finding quite intriguing is mixing the financial model with radical openness to build new value. Within the publicly funded higher education system:

Free learning plus open source content plus credible credentials is the game changer for formal education. It shifts the question from how to achieve sustainable OER projects to how will your publicly funded institution remain sustainable without OER? Moreover, its not that hard to achieve :-)

Jason,

Thank you.  MOOCs have really captivated media that normally pays little attention to incremental developments in online learning – things that are buried in the college and university structure.  I think that this has contributed to coverage that has been a little superficial and sensational.  I know that there are arguments for degrees of openness, which I understand and appreciate, but I also think that it is good to have a definition of what "open" is and an appreciation of the shades or degrees of openness.  That said, as you point out, practically there can be a big functional different between being open and being sort of open. I know that the topic is being well covered, but the potential for MOOCs that are committed to the Free Cultural Works standard is pretty amazing.  You are right, MFFOC is a pretty bad acronym.  Good thing I am not a marketer.

Cheers,

Ken

From: "Blanchard,Jason" <jwb82@DREXEL.EDU>
Reply-To: "The EDUCAUSE Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Constituent Group Listserv" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 14 Nov 2012 15:24:11 -0500
To: <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [MOOCS] Massive Fee Free Online Courses?

I like your classification here, Ken. There seems to be some chatter within the edu community about this dichotomy, but, sadly, the major media coverage really hasn't talked about it much. Which is extra frustrating considering the fact that MOOCs have their origin more in this "Free Cultural Works" sense of "open."

As you point out, eyes are on the business models to see how Coursera and others will react (or not) to this. Plus, unfortunately, 'MFFOC' don't really have the same ring to it, huh?

I thought of this the other day when I wanted to share information with a colleague about Behavior Drive Design, which was covered in the EdX SaaS course. Since that course (and maybe the whole platform?) uses YouTube videos, I was able to email them just direct link to the one relevant video. Although this is a pretty unsophisticated, it is this kind of remix that would have real value across all education institutions and endeavors. It's easy to realize how much we take this for granted when we try to do the same with a Coursera video, and cannot share or remix the content stuck in a closed system.

// Jason


--
Jason Blanchard
Instructional Designer

School of Education
Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Drexel University
One Drexel Plaza
3001 Market Street, Suite 100
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Tel: 215-571-3927 |  Fax: 215.895.2153
Drexel.edu/soe
Goodwin.drexel.edu

From: Ken Udas <ken.udas@GMAIL.COM>
Reply-To: "The EDUCAUSE Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Constituent Group Listserv" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
To: "MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <MOOCS@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [MOOCS] Massive Fee Free Online Courses?

Hello Openness (and MOOC) colleagues.  I am cross posting this from the Openness CG, pardon any double messages.

I just posted a little post (http://bit.ly/ZJXeOn) in which I poked at the idea of creating some clarity (I hope not purity) in the larger community regarding MOOCs and Openness. As a point of intellectual honesty and truth in labeling, I thought that it might be worth at least considering removing “Open” from Coursera type courses and replacing it with “Fee Free.” MOOCs become MFFOCs (Massive Fee Free Online Courses), and the notion of Openness is respected and its definition is acknowledged.


Although this might seem a bit trivial, I do think that there is a lot in a name and I agree with others on this list who have pointed out the negative trend of "openwashing."  Maybe it's too late.


Just a thought.

Cheers -Ken

--
A University is, according to the usual designation, an Alma Mater, knowing her children one by one, not a foundry, or a mint, or a treadmill. 

-Newman, John Henry


Latent Pattern Transmission





********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from mackintosh.wayne@gmail.com

Hi Jason,

I think the low-hanging fruit factor is import -- we need to get better at integrating open education approaches in the mainstream workflow of our teachers in ways which make life easier.

In addition, there is also the sustainable practice dimension, for example: "Here are a few things worth doing, it may take a little more time and effort, but the result is a more sustainable planet for us all."

Many facets to open futures :-)

Wayne

Interesting ideas, Ken. I have to say, though, personally I'd shy away from using MFFOCs, as this is something I mutter regularly when technology doesn't work... 

I find the Coursera terms confusing, as I was under the impression that the institution's licensing is the master "the property of Coursera and/or its affiliates " - but and/or is a bit vague? For example, the JHSPH materials, in my understanding, were to be CC licensed the same as the JHSPH OCW materials. The rest of the copy/distribute/reuse statement seems to refute that, however. 


Clark Shah-Nelson




Clark - fair enough.  I was thinking the same thing and fell short of writing it.  Any acronym that starts with "MF" and has 5 letters, better have some other great qualities. 

I must admit that while reading the terms and then the agreement I found myself saying to myself that some of the statements seem to be in conflict. This was particularity true for the bits about what the partners and Coursera can represent to student/participants and other universities relative to credits and credentials. I assumed though that the lawyers made sure that it all held together and would be interpreted in the ways that Coursera intended.

I am guessing that there is somebody on this list that can interpret the language and has a notion of what happens if content is originally licensed with some rights reserved, but later appears to be in conflict with some other contractual arrangement.


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