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Is there any thought,reaction to thee terms of use related to Coursera and edX? Please see: https://www.edx.org/terms https://www.coursera.org/about/terms They both seem to me limit use and also transfer ownership of submitted work to each platform. Cable? Sent from my Commodore 64

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What is notable about Coursera is the use of "and/or" in its terms - because in actuality, the content provided by an institution can be licensed under that institution's license. In the case of JHSPH, it comes down to the course level - as instructors can choose. So, for example, some content from JHSPH has the same CC license as JHSPH OpenCourseWare

But, the terms are also confusing, because they go on to indicate that " You may not otherwise copy, reproduce, retransmit, distribute, publish, commercially exploit or otherwise transfer any material, nor may you modify or create derivatives works of the material. " which goes against the CC license some of our course content has.

Blog post about this here: http://www.clarkshahnelson.com/blog/?p=123



Clark Shah-Nelson
Sr. Instructional Designer, Center for Teaching and Learning
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
111 Market Pl. Ste. 830 Baltimore, MD 21202
voice/SMS: +1-410-929-0070 --- IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson
fax#: +1-270-514-0112
http://clarkshahnelson.com


Hi,
From Courera. "With respect to User Content you submit or otherwise make available in connection with your use of the Site, and subject to the Privacy Policy, you grant Coursera and the Participating Institutions a fully transferable, worldwide, perpetual, royalty-free and non-exclusive license to use, distribute, sublicense, reproduce, modify, adapt, publicly perform and publicly display such User Content." "Fully transferable" non-exclusive" etc makes me think any copyright I may assign, by posting, I transfer to them? Has Creative Commons discussed this or offered an opinion? Sent from my Commodore 64 Clark Shah-Nelson <clarkshahnelson@GMAIL.COM> wrote:
What is notable about Coursera is the use of "and/or" in its terms - because in actuality, the content provided by an institution can be licensed under that institution's license. In the case of JHSPH, it comes down to the course level - as instructors can choose. So, for example, some content from JHSPH has the same CC license as JHSPH OpenCourseWare

But, the terms are also confusing, because they go on to indicate that " You may not otherwise copy, reproduce, retransmit, distribute, publish, commercially exploit or otherwise transfer any material, nor may you modify or create derivatives works of the material. " which goes against the CC license some of our course content has.

Blog post about this here: http://www.clarkshahnelson.com/blog/?p=123



Clark Shah-Nelson
Sr. Instructional Designer, Center for Teaching and Learning
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
111 Market Pl. Ste. 830 Baltimore, MD 21202
voice/SMS: +1-410-929-0070 --- IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson
fax#: +1-270-514-0112
http://clarkshahnelson.com


Message from david.wiley@gmail.com

The more interesting part of the Coursera terms, to me at least, has always been: "You may not take any Online Course offered by Coursera or use any Statement of Accomplishment as part of any tuition-based or for-credit certification or program for any college, university, or other academic institution without the express written permission from Coursera. Such use of an Online Course or Statement of Accomplishment is a violation of these Terms of Use." I think few people fully understand what that implies...
And I believe that User Content (as opposed to institutional post content) would include discussion forum posts, quiz-taking data, uploaded assignments and/or peer reviews, but not institutional posted course content. ?

Clark Shah-Nelson
Sr. Instructional Designer, Center for Teaching and Learning
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
111 Market Pl. Ste. 830 Baltimore, MD 21202
voice/SMS: +1-410-929-0070 --- IM, Skype, Twitter: clarkshahnelson
fax#: +1-270-514-0112
http://clarkshahnelson.com


David, Yes, Definitely not as open (access) as one would assume based on the language from those who have recently adopted the platform. And although I think this is a different part of open, it highlights the ambiguity that exists and assumptions many are making in not only MOOCs but openness. Has anyone done any analysis of these platforms related to openness? Sent from my Commodore 64 David Wiley wrote: The more interesting part of the Coursera terms, to me at least, has always been: "You may not take any Online Course offered by Coursera or use any Statement of Accomplishment as part of any tuition-based or for-credit certification or program for any college, university, or other academic institution without the express written permission from Coursera. Such use of an Online Course or Statement of Accomplishment is a violation of these Terms of Use." I think few people fully understand what that implies...
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