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Message from ehoover@doit.wisc.edu

Good morning,

 

The User Services group at the UW Madison’s Division of Information Technology is creating a new Professional Development program for our staff. Professional Development and staff training have been identified as priorities for our 2 year departmental strategic plan. The target date for this particular initiative to be up and running is before the end of this fiscal year, 06/30/14.

 

Rather than re-create the wheel, I’m wondering what successful programs are already out there and if you’d be willing to share with our team.  We’re really starting with a blank slate so any and all contributions will be valued.

  

And, of course, I’ll be willing to share our finished deliverable at the end of the project.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Edward

 

Edward Hoover

DoIT Tech Store Manager

Division of Information Technology

University of Wisconsin - Madison

608.262.3363

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

NERCOMP recently held a conference on this topic for online faculty PD. Might be informative since most were campus-based operations:



Thx - Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Chalk & Wire Administrator
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


From: Edward Hoover <ehoover@DOIT.WISC.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Professional Development Constituent Group Listserv <PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thursday, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM
To: "PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [PROFDEV] Model Templates for Professional Development Plans

Good morning,

 

The User Services group at the UW Madison’s Division of Information Technology is creating a new Professional Development program for our staff. Professional Development and staff training have been identified as priorities for our 2 year departmental strategic plan. The target date for this particular initiative to be up and running is before the end of this fiscal year, 06/30/14.

 

Rather than re-create the wheel, I’m wondering what successful programs are already out there and if you’d be willing to share with our team.  We’re really starting with a blank slate so any and all contributions will be valued.

  

And, of course, I’ll be willing to share our finished deliverable at the end of the project.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Edward

 

Edward Hoover

DoIT Tech Store Manager

Division of Information Technology

University of Wisconsin - Madison

608.262.3363

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi Edward,

I’m actually finishing up a book on how to create Professional Development Plans.  I’d be happy to provide a preview copy in exchange for feedback.  It includes templates I created in Excel.  It’s based on 20 years of working on Instructional Systems.  It’s not a canned set of courses – instead it’s a process for creating a PDP for each position and then each person.

 

Marty

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

I would be interested in this topic and will be happy to provide feedback.

 

 

Dr. Vartouhi Asherian

Senior Analyst, eLearning

Quality Matters Master Reviewer

Adjunct Instructor

Faculty Senator

 

College of Southern Nevada

eLearning Office (W. Charleston C213)

6375 W. Charleston Blvd.

Office of eLearning (W2C 213)

Las Vegas NV 89146

 

702-651-7396 Phone

702-651-5741 Fax

vartouhi.asherian@csn.edu

 

 

Marty, Edward – all,

 

I too, would be interested in any examples or templates and be willing to provide feedback. I would say the biggest obstacle we have is getting buy-in from our managers with regard to actually taking time to sit down with their staff and map out a specific plan. This is done during performance review time, and it typically takes the form of just asking “what training do you think you need for next year?” with limited thought.

 

What tends to happen for us is, although managers understand the importance of professional development and we offer such opportunities – it’s often done in a “just in time” mode, related to what they are working on at the moment, what’s the newest technologies they need to learn, and not with any long-term goal /commitment.

 

Also, there’s a tendency to focus on technical skill development and the skillsets for teamwork, collaboration, communication (including written communication), -- soft skill development often doesn’t get the same level of attention.

 

I would be interested in how you tie PDP into career-pathing efforts.   Does anyone create staff profiles that might indicate what types of positions they would be interested in – or leadership/managerial roles. These would get updated periodically.   Some staff don’t want managerial roles – but may be interested in cross-training for other positions as a new challenge.

 

…Cathy

 

___________________________________________________________

Cathy Hanson, PHR

IT Staff Development Coordinator  /  Information Technology Division

 

Quentin Burdick Building 210F (formerly the IACC*)

Dept 4500, PO Box 6050  /  Fargo, ND 58108-6050

p. 701.231.9470  /  f. 701.231.8541

www.ndsu.edu

 

 

*The Industrial Agriculture and Communications Center (IACC) was recently renamed to the Quentin Burdick Building. Please assist in transitioning to the new name by adjusting any documents, handouts, signage, social media sites and Web content that reference the building.

 

Cathy, mine follow yours:

 

Marty, Edward – all,

 

I too, would be interested in any examples or templates and be willing to provide feedback.

I’ve sent to you an email off-list…

 

I would say the biggest obstacle we have is getting buy-in from our managers with regard to actually taking time to sit down with their staff and map out a specific plan. This is done during performance review time, and it typically takes the form of just asking “what training do you think you need for next year?” with limited thought.

Totally understand.  I spend a good portion of the book (especially up front) “talking” to the manager, explaining why it should be much more.  The development plan has the potential to be an awesome catalyst and tool for building rapport with the worker.  It opens the door for conversations and constant feedback on how well the worker does the job.  This becomes very interesting in light of the work I’ve done on Metrics.  Managers seem eager to get metrics which show how well their workers are performing…so it would seem logical that they’d be excited about ways that not only tell them the skill levels of their staff but that can help them improve those skills.  Perhaps the answer is to stop addressing it as training or even development plans and instead talk about assessing and improving the workers’ ability to do the job.

 

What tends to happen for us is, although managers understand the importance of professional development and we offer such opportunities – it’s often done in a “just in time” mode, related to what they are working on at the moment, what’s the newest technologies they need to learn, and not with any long-term goal /commitment.

This actually isn’t a bad thing.  Well, a little bad.  “Just-in-time” training can be a very good thing, but it should still be planned, not a crisis management tool.  From your first paragraph, I’m not confident that your managers “understand the importance of professional development.”  I don’t think the managers see the WIIFM for them or for the organization.  I think they may only see it as a benefit for the worker.

 

Also, there’s a tendency to focus on technical skill development and the skillsets for teamwork, collaboration, communication (including written communication), -- soft skill development often doesn’t get the same level of attention.

Yes.  Or vice versa.  I’ve seen it where managers send their folk to a lot of soft skilled training and leave the technical stuff to them.  Back to your first paragraph of asking annually, “what training do you want to attend?”  Both are solved the same way.  If we develop a master task list for the position (and then the person) we can identify all of the tasks, technical and soft-skilled, which go into doing the job. 

 

I would be interested in how you tie PDP into career-pathing efforts.   Does anyone create staff profiles that might indicate what types of positions they would be interested in – or leadership/managerial roles. These would get updated periodically.   Some staff don’t want managerial roles – but may be interested in cross-training for other positions as a new challenge.  If we develop a Professional Development Plan for each position (there are definite problems with getting this done across an organization due to Organizational Immaturity) than what you ask for is easy since the MTLs for each can be used to see what is required from a cross-training or matrix point of view.

 

Marty

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

This is a very interesting thread and is very timely.  I just wanted to toss in a few notes about the approach I used this past summer in our department.

 

I’ve been in my current role for a couple of years and even though I had been in a different part of the organization and was familiar with the department which I now reside, I didn’t have the intimate knowledge of all staff and their skills.  This past summer I decided to work on that after working on some project plans and realizing that our new project management system, once purchased, could have skills listed for the employees, and should.

 

I began the process by coming up with a list of skills, a skills inventory, that I saw that my staff had in order to perform their jobs.  I didn’t want to get too detailed for fear that I would have hundreds of skills listed but stayed open to getting granular where it made sense.  I then talked to each of my staff and asked for their input.  During one of my one on one meetings that I have each month with each of my staff, I read the list and we talked about what needed to be added.  I explained where I was going with the process, citing project management, a desire to make sure we had sufficient coverage in all areas, and proper training to build up skills and provide opportunities for certifications if the staff were interested.  I added skills as necessary.

 

After I had a good list of skills, I took on the task of assessing where I thought each person’s skill level was.  I took a very simple 0 – 4 scale with 0 being none and 4 being advanced.  I once again met with each of my staff and we discussed where they would rank themselves.  I was surprised at how open they were and how open each person was to scoring themselves low.

 

I used the scoring to help me see where I lacked depth and where I needed to improve the skill level of the staff.  In some cases, I found I only had a couple of people who were comfortable enough and had enough skills in that area to cover the work.  I targeted that as a high priority to get training for others.  So, I found classes that cover the skill areas we listed and I have a tentative list of classes for each person.  I also have a target certification for each person, should they be interested, but in the training classes I identified, they do lead to opportunities for certifications.

 

I had the other managers in our department do the same for their areas.  When our CIO saw our work, he asked the other departments to follow the same model for the skills inventory.  We’ve been able to get that done.

 

I will say that the staff appear to be excited about the training opportunities.

 

One of my todo’s is to identify those who are interested in non-technical areas, such as management, and provide opportunities for training in those areas as well.

 

lj

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Jennings

Assistant Director – OIT Communications Group

The University of Tennessee

Email: ljenning at utk.edu

 

 

Hi Larry,

This fits perfectly into the methodology I champion.  I work down to the Task level (rather than skill – but they are likely the same), and I include a “360” review of the abilities of the staff.  I also suggest that you evaluate the skill levels necessary to do the job so that you can clearly see any gaps (or areas that your folk are way above the need).  The basic steps are:

1.       Identify the job

2.       Identify the tasks which make up the role/job

3.       Evaluate the tasks (I look at four factors) to determine if they are training requirements, what type of training would be best, when the training should occur, etc.

4.       Evaluate the required level of skill for each task (this can range.  You might need a couple of 3s, a 4, and the rest can be 2s)

5.       Evaluate the skill level of those filling the role (definitely want the worker and the manager to do so independently and then compare notes…it’s a great conversation as you’ve noted!)

6.       Determine which tasks will be trained, when they will be trained, how they will be trained. 

7.       Evaluate the effectiveness of the training.

8.       Start back at 4 until the gap is removed.


The most important benefit from the process is that the manager and worker participate in a very healthy and rewarding dialogue. 

 

You’d make a great case study for my book :  - )

 

Awesome!

 

Marty

 

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

Jonassen/Tessmer/Hannum's book might be a good companion: "Task Analysis Methods for Instructional Design" though it might be outdated in certain ways. Get it cheap and review the research.


Thx - Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Chalk & Wire Administrator
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


Thanks for all the great feedback – great ideas to absorb and work toward addressing for the 2014!

 

___________________________________________________________

Cathy Hanson, PHR

IT Staff Development Coordinator  /  Information Technology Division

 

Quentin Burdick Building 210F (formerly the IACC*)

Dept 4500, PO Box 6050  /  Fargo, ND 58108-6050

p. 701.231.9470  /  f. 701.231.8541

www.ndsu.edu

 

 

*The Industrial Agriculture and Communications Center (IACC) was recently renamed to the Quentin Burdick Building. Please assist in transitioning to the new name by adjusting any documents, handouts, signage, social media sites and Web content that reference the building.

 

Message from ehoover@doit.wisc.edu

Good morning,

 

The User Services group at the UW Madison’s Division of Information Technology is creating a new Professional Development program for our staff. Professional Development and staff training have been identified as priorities for our 2 year departmental strategic plan. The target date for this particular initiative to be up and running is before the end of this fiscal year, 06/30/14.

 

Rather than re-create the wheel, I’m wondering what successful programs are already out there and if you’d be willing to share with our team.  We’re really starting with a blank slate so any and all contributions will be valued.

  

And, of course, I’ll be willing to share our finished deliverable at the end of the project.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Edward

 

Edward Hoover

DoIT Tech Store Manager

Division of Information Technology

University of Wisconsin - Madison

608.262.3363

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

NERCOMP recently held a conference on this topic for online faculty PD. Might be informative since most were campus-based operations:



Thx - Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Chalk & Wire Administrator
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


From: Edward Hoover <ehoover@DOIT.WISC.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Professional Development Constituent Group Listserv <PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Thursday, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM
To: "PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <PROFDEV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [PROFDEV] Model Templates for Professional Development Plans

Good morning,

 

The User Services group at the UW Madison’s Division of Information Technology is creating a new Professional Development program for our staff. Professional Development and staff training have been identified as priorities for our 2 year departmental strategic plan. The target date for this particular initiative to be up and running is before the end of this fiscal year, 06/30/14.

 

Rather than re-create the wheel, I’m wondering what successful programs are already out there and if you’d be willing to share with our team.  We’re really starting with a blank slate so any and all contributions will be valued.

  

And, of course, I’ll be willing to share our finished deliverable at the end of the project.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Edward

 

Edward Hoover

DoIT Tech Store Manager

Division of Information Technology

University of Wisconsin - Madison

608.262.3363

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Hi Edward,

I’m actually finishing up a book on how to create Professional Development Plans.  I’d be happy to provide a preview copy in exchange for feedback.  It includes templates I created in Excel.  It’s based on 20 years of working on Instructional Systems.  It’s not a canned set of courses – instead it’s a process for creating a PDP for each position and then each person.

 

Marty

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

I would be interested in this topic and will be happy to provide feedback.

 

 

Dr. Vartouhi Asherian

Senior Analyst, eLearning

Quality Matters Master Reviewer

Adjunct Instructor

Faculty Senator

 

College of Southern Nevada

eLearning Office (W. Charleston C213)

6375 W. Charleston Blvd.

Office of eLearning (W2C 213)

Las Vegas NV 89146

 

702-651-7396 Phone

702-651-5741 Fax

vartouhi.asherian@csn.edu

 

 

Marty, Edward – all,

 

I too, would be interested in any examples or templates and be willing to provide feedback. I would say the biggest obstacle we have is getting buy-in from our managers with regard to actually taking time to sit down with their staff and map out a specific plan. This is done during performance review time, and it typically takes the form of just asking “what training do you think you need for next year?” with limited thought.

 

What tends to happen for us is, although managers understand the importance of professional development and we offer such opportunities – it’s often done in a “just in time” mode, related to what they are working on at the moment, what’s the newest technologies they need to learn, and not with any long-term goal /commitment.

 

Also, there’s a tendency to focus on technical skill development and the skillsets for teamwork, collaboration, communication (including written communication), -- soft skill development often doesn’t get the same level of attention.

 

I would be interested in how you tie PDP into career-pathing efforts.   Does anyone create staff profiles that might indicate what types of positions they would be interested in – or leadership/managerial roles. These would get updated periodically.   Some staff don’t want managerial roles – but may be interested in cross-training for other positions as a new challenge.

 

…Cathy

 

___________________________________________________________

Cathy Hanson, PHR

IT Staff Development Coordinator  /  Information Technology Division

 

Quentin Burdick Building 210F (formerly the IACC*)

Dept 4500, PO Box 6050  /  Fargo, ND 58108-6050

p. 701.231.9470  /  f. 701.231.8541

www.ndsu.edu

 

 

*The Industrial Agriculture and Communications Center (IACC) was recently renamed to the Quentin Burdick Building. Please assist in transitioning to the new name by adjusting any documents, handouts, signage, social media sites and Web content that reference the building.

 

Cathy, mine follow yours:

 

Marty, Edward – all,

 

I too, would be interested in any examples or templates and be willing to provide feedback.

I’ve sent to you an email off-list…

 

I would say the biggest obstacle we have is getting buy-in from our managers with regard to actually taking time to sit down with their staff and map out a specific plan. This is done during performance review time, and it typically takes the form of just asking “what training do you think you need for next year?” with limited thought.

Totally understand.  I spend a good portion of the book (especially up front) “talking” to the manager, explaining why it should be much more.  The development plan has the potential to be an awesome catalyst and tool for building rapport with the worker.  It opens the door for conversations and constant feedback on how well the worker does the job.  This becomes very interesting in light of the work I’ve done on Metrics.  Managers seem eager to get metrics which show how well their workers are performing…so it would seem logical that they’d be excited about ways that not only tell them the skill levels of their staff but that can help them improve those skills.  Perhaps the answer is to stop addressing it as training or even development plans and instead talk about assessing and improving the workers’ ability to do the job.

 

What tends to happen for us is, although managers understand the importance of professional development and we offer such opportunities – it’s often done in a “just in time” mode, related to what they are working on at the moment, what’s the newest technologies they need to learn, and not with any long-term goal /commitment.

This actually isn’t a bad thing.  Well, a little bad.  “Just-in-time” training can be a very good thing, but it should still be planned, not a crisis management tool.  From your first paragraph, I’m not confident that your managers “understand the importance of professional development.”  I don’t think the managers see the WIIFM for them or for the organization.  I think they may only see it as a benefit for the worker.

 

Also, there’s a tendency to focus on technical skill development and the skillsets for teamwork, collaboration, communication (including written communication), -- soft skill development often doesn’t get the same level of attention.

Yes.  Or vice versa.  I’ve seen it where managers send their folk to a lot of soft skilled training and leave the technical stuff to them.  Back to your first paragraph of asking annually, “what training do you want to attend?”  Both are solved the same way.  If we develop a master task list for the position (and then the person) we can identify all of the tasks, technical and soft-skilled, which go into doing the job. 

 

I would be interested in how you tie PDP into career-pathing efforts.   Does anyone create staff profiles that might indicate what types of positions they would be interested in – or leadership/managerial roles. These would get updated periodically.   Some staff don’t want managerial roles – but may be interested in cross-training for other positions as a new challenge.  If we develop a Professional Development Plan for each position (there are definite problems with getting this done across an organization due to Organizational Immaturity) than what you ask for is easy since the MTLs for each can be used to see what is required from a cross-training or matrix point of view.

 

Marty

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

This is a very interesting thread and is very timely.  I just wanted to toss in a few notes about the approach I used this past summer in our department.

 

I’ve been in my current role for a couple of years and even though I had been in a different part of the organization and was familiar with the department which I now reside, I didn’t have the intimate knowledge of all staff and their skills.  This past summer I decided to work on that after working on some project plans and realizing that our new project management system, once purchased, could have skills listed for the employees, and should.

 

I began the process by coming up with a list of skills, a skills inventory, that I saw that my staff had in order to perform their jobs.  I didn’t want to get too detailed for fear that I would have hundreds of skills listed but stayed open to getting granular where it made sense.  I then talked to each of my staff and asked for their input.  During one of my one on one meetings that I have each month with each of my staff, I read the list and we talked about what needed to be added.  I explained where I was going with the process, citing project management, a desire to make sure we had sufficient coverage in all areas, and proper training to build up skills and provide opportunities for certifications if the staff were interested.  I added skills as necessary.

 

After I had a good list of skills, I took on the task of assessing where I thought each person’s skill level was.  I took a very simple 0 – 4 scale with 0 being none and 4 being advanced.  I once again met with each of my staff and we discussed where they would rank themselves.  I was surprised at how open they were and how open each person was to scoring themselves low.

 

I used the scoring to help me see where I lacked depth and where I needed to improve the skill level of the staff.  In some cases, I found I only had a couple of people who were comfortable enough and had enough skills in that area to cover the work.  I targeted that as a high priority to get training for others.  So, I found classes that cover the skill areas we listed and I have a tentative list of classes for each person.  I also have a target certification for each person, should they be interested, but in the training classes I identified, they do lead to opportunities for certifications.

 

I had the other managers in our department do the same for their areas.  When our CIO saw our work, he asked the other departments to follow the same model for the skills inventory.  We’ve been able to get that done.

 

I will say that the staff appear to be excited about the training opportunities.

 

One of my todo’s is to identify those who are interested in non-technical areas, such as management, and provide opportunities for training in those areas as well.

 

lj

 

 

 

 

 

Larry Jennings

Assistant Director – OIT Communications Group

The University of Tennessee

Email: ljenning at utk.edu

 

 

Hi Larry,

This fits perfectly into the methodology I champion.  I work down to the Task level (rather than skill – but they are likely the same), and I include a “360” review of the abilities of the staff.  I also suggest that you evaluate the skill levels necessary to do the job so that you can clearly see any gaps (or areas that your folk are way above the need).  The basic steps are:

1.       Identify the job

2.       Identify the tasks which make up the role/job

3.       Evaluate the tasks (I look at four factors) to determine if they are training requirements, what type of training would be best, when the training should occur, etc.

4.       Evaluate the required level of skill for each task (this can range.  You might need a couple of 3s, a 4, and the rest can be 2s)

5.       Evaluate the skill level of those filling the role (definitely want the worker and the manager to do so independently and then compare notes…it’s a great conversation as you’ve noted!)

6.       Determine which tasks will be trained, when they will be trained, how they will be trained. 

7.       Evaluate the effectiveness of the training.

8.       Start back at 4 until the gap is removed.


The most important benefit from the process is that the manager and worker participate in a very healthy and rewarding dialogue. 

 

You’d make a great case study for my book :  - )

 

Awesome!

 

Marty

 

 

Martin Klubeck, MA
Strategy & Planning Consultant

Office of Information Technologies

200A ITC
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame, IN 46556

(574)-631-5447

 

 DTRT  TRW  TFT

"If you don't know where you are, a map won't help,

If you don't know where you're going, any map will do"

 

Please consider the environment when considering printing emails.  But, since you’re obviously an email power user, I guess I don’t need to tell you not to print this email.  I mean we’re having a meaningful back and forth, aren’t we?  I’m proud of you and thank you for safeguarding our environment for the future generations… J

 

 

Jonassen/Tessmer/Hannum's book might be a good companion: "Task Analysis Methods for Instructional Design" though it might be outdated in certain ways. Get it cheap and review the research.


Thx - Steve

-- 
Steve Covello
Rich Media Specialist/Online Instructor
Chalk & Wire Administrator
Granite State College
603-513-1346
Skype: steve.granitestate


Thanks for all the great feedback – great ideas to absorb and work toward addressing for the 2014!

 

___________________________________________________________

Cathy Hanson, PHR

IT Staff Development Coordinator  /  Information Technology Division

 

Quentin Burdick Building 210F (formerly the IACC*)

Dept 4500, PO Box 6050  /  Fargo, ND 58108-6050

p. 701.231.9470  /  f. 701.231.8541

www.ndsu.edu

 

 

*The Industrial Agriculture and Communications Center (IACC) was recently renamed to the Quentin Burdick Building. Please assist in transitioning to the new name by adjusting any documents, handouts, signage, social media sites and Web content that reference the building.

 

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