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Hello everyone!
 
How do you use lessons learned at your organization?  Usually it is something collected at the end of the project and documented.  Does anyone collect them throughout the duration of the project?   How do you use them once collected?   How are they made available to the organization (and does anyone actually use them)?
 
Anthony L Fox, PMP
Project Manager | Old Dominion University
Office of Communications and Computer Services
4700 Elkhorn Avenue, Suite 4304, Norfolk, VA 23529
Desk: 757-683-3693 | Fax 757-683-5155
 
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Anthony

For projects that I am leading, I often collect lessons learned along the way - but just an informal list that can be used at project end.   At the end of the project, we have a meeting with the project team to discuss lessons learned and I usually put out some examples and categories of things to think about to get the discussion started.   After the meeting, the lessons learned are incorporated into the project close report and that goes to the project sponsors and all team members.    I work in our information systems group and so I will sometimes circulate lessons learned to my whole unit where applicable. 

The lessons learned are most certainly used for next projects.  The process of meeting, discussing and documenting makes them tangible and usable.  Over time as we work on different projects with same people, we often refer to previous projects and what we learned from them.  

Karen

On 2011-12-07 9:52 AM, Fox, Anthony L. wrote:
Hello everyone!
 
How do you use lessons learned at your organization?  Usually it is something collected at the end of the project and documented.  Does anyone collect them throughout the duration of the project?   How do you use them once collected?   How are they made available to the organization (and does anyone actually use them)?
 
Anthony L Fox, PMP
Project Manager | Old Dominion University
Office of Communications and Computer Services
4700 Elkhorn Avenue, Suite 4304, Norfolk, VA 23529
Desk: 757-683-3693 | Fax 757-683-5155
 
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Do you have any templates or examples / samples you could share?  We are implementing and building project management processes down here.

 

Thank you,

 

 

Anthony,

 

We have begun a two-pronged lessons learned process during the close-out of a project: 

 

1)  an anonymous survey that asks about what went well, what could be improved next time, and a variety of questions about the project, the PM process, etc.

2) an in-person meeting with the project team to discuss lessons learned.

 

The survey results and associated metrics, as well as feedback collected from the meeting is all stored in one document that is housed in the project’s Sharepoint site.

 

My plan for making these lessons easy to refer back to is to add them to a shared area in our PMO site, categorized by type of project (we have a few major categories of project types – custom software, 3rd party vendor install, infrastructure, upgrades/enhancements).  Upon starting a new project, it would be great to make the initiation process include a review of the lessons learned within the project type that you’re embarking on. 

 

I often conduct much less formal mini-lessons-learned discussions at milestone intervals during larger projects.  These are not as systematically collected for future use, but probably should be.

 

Robyn

 

 

I do the same process.

Paula Brossard, PMP
UITS Project Manager
UW–Milwaukee -
UITS EMS EB72
Office: (414)229-2831
Cell: (414)416-7807
E-mail: brossard@uwm.edu


From: "Karen Chelladurai" <kchellad@UWO.CA>
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Wednesday, December 7, 2011 9:01:36 AM
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Lessons Learned

Anthony

For projects that I am leading, I often collect lessons learned along the way - but just an informal list that can be used at project end.   At the end of the project, we have a meeting with the project team to discuss lessons learned and I usually put out some examples and categories of things to think about to get the discussion started.   After the meeting, the lessons learned are incorporated into the project close report and that goes to the project sponsors and all team members.    I work in our information systems group and so I will sometimes circulate lessons learned to my whole unit where applicable. 

The lessons learned are most certainly used for next projects.  The process of meeting, discussing and documenting makes them tangible and usable.  Over time as we work on different projects with same people, we often refer to previous projects and what we learned from them.  

Karen

On 2011-12-07 9:52 AM, Fox, Anthony L. wrote:
Hello everyone!
 
How do you use lessons learned at your organization?  Usually it is something collected at the end of the project and documented.  Does anyone collect them throughout the duration of the project?   How do you use them once collected?   How are they made available to the organization (and does anyone actually use them)?
 
Anthony L Fox, PMP
Project Manager | Old Dominion University
Office of Communications and Computer Services
4700 Elkhorn Avenue, Suite 4304, Norfolk, VA 23529
Desk: 757-683-3693 | Fax 757-683-5155
 
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We recently completed a very large project to implement the Kuali Financial System.  It was successful, and the go-live was surprisingly smooth, but it was a long and complex project, surely with some lessons!  So we decided that we wanted to do a formal lessons learned analysis.  Our approach was to do a survey, though we chose not to do an anonymous survey, fearing that anonymous information would not be very actionable, and difficult to follow up on in any case.  We are now in the process of collating the results.  Attached is the form we used, as well as the introductory communication inviting participation.

 

--Hank

 

Anthony,

At the U of R, we do document lessons learned throughout projects.  We use a phase/gate methodology and lessons learned are reviewed at each gate meeting.

We also compile completed lessons learned documents in a sharepoint repository for all to access.  Of course, that requires PM’s to search for and pull the information.  On the push side, we have categorized lessons learned and will be starting a training program in January to enhance our skills in the leading topics (Estimating, Risk Management, and Communication Management).

 

I have attached our Closeout Summary template where LL is documented.  The Lessons Learned section is maintained during the project and the entire deliverable is due at the end of the project.

 

Doug

 

Good morning,

 

We collect lessons learned informally as we go along in our projects.  At the end of the project, we use the attached document to collect and report on them.  We forward a copy of what the Project Manager perceives the lessons learned to be to the stakeholders who have to sign off and agree to the points in the document.  When the PM fills out the form, he/she provides explanations and reasons for their ratings so that there is a point for discussion during the review meeting.

 

Once the stakeholders review and provide their modifications and feedback, we meet as a team to discuss the points in general.  Once everyone is in agreement and consensus has been reached, the sponsors are asked to sign off on the document. 

 

There may be times when additional points are added to this template.  It really depends on the individual project.  However, this template serves the majority of the projects and is a great way to get the dialogue started with the team.  Once signed, they are scanned with the signatures and loaded and stored with the project  closure data.  They are maintained in a central repository that is accessible by all project participants.  These documents are available for reference during future projects.

 

 

Have a great day!

Linda Evans, MBA, PMP

EA Senior Project Manager

University of the Pacific

3601 Pacific Avenue

Stockton, CA 95211

209-946-7687

 

It takes a hurricane to appreciate a storm.
MJP

 

 

 

 

Excellent.  Thank you.

 

At Mason, we have two templates that we use for the end of our project.  We have a "Close-out Report" which is used for larger projects and captures more detailed information, and then we have a less formal "Lessons Learned" document that is meant to capture thoughts and details about what went right and wrong on the project.  Templates for these can be found on our PMO's website.  Here is  a direct link to the templates page:  http://pmo.gmu.edu/projecttemplates.html

Typically, we'll capture our notes and lessons learned along the way in an informal basis by using our project framework tool; however, the formal report is normally written at the end of the project.  As others have stated, we normally cross paths with the same people across multiple projects, so the shared experiences and documented references help us learn and adapt to what works best and (hopefully) not repeat mistakes.

John

John Prette
IT Project Manager
ITU Project Management Office
George Mason University
4400 University Drive MSN 1D8
Fairfax, VA  22030
Ph:  703-993-4009
Fax: 703-993-4961
JPrette@gmu.edu

From: "Fox, Anthony L." <alfox@ODU.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group <PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 07 Dec 2011 09:52:21 -0500
To: <PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: [PROJECT] Lessons Learned

Hello everyone!
 
How do you use lessons learned at your organization?  Usually it is something collected at the end of the project and documented.  Does anyone collect them throughout the duration of the project?   How do you use them once collected?   How are they made available to the organization (and does anyone actually use them)?
 
Anthony L Fox, PMP
Project Manager | Old Dominion University
Office of Communications and Computer Services
4700 Elkhorn Avenue, Suite 4304, Norfolk, VA 23529
Desk: 757-683-3693 | Fax 757-683-5155
 
 
 
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

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