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I have been asked to do a little research to find out how other universities handle their CCTV service. Basically, where their CCTV is run from (onsite/offsite) and who manages it (contracted, university IT, public safety, etc.).  I didn’t really know where to start, so I thought I would ask you all.  I imagine this might turn into a project, so maybe it’s not totally random for this list. :o)

 

Any responses would be appreciated.

 

Thanks!

 

Thelma

 

Thelma Simons  | Project & Process Management Office | KU Information Technology 

The University of Kansas  |  1001 Sunnyside Drive  |  Lawrence KS  66045
Phone: 785.864.0269  |  Email: tsimons@ku.edu   |  Web: www.technology.ku.edu

 

“A woman is like a tea bag. You never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.”  –Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

Message from jkaranja@kenet.or.ke

Dear Thelma,

 

Am writing this from Kenya (Kenya Education Network – KENET). Most of the Universities here (including KENET) contract someone to install and maintain the systems and management is down from internal resources.

 

Regards

 

Josphat.

 

Hi Thelma
This is a question we have wrestled with at Northern Illinois University for a number of years. I oversee Residential Technology, our first experience with CCTV was to install cameras in our computer labs so we could open them 24/7. That was in 2004. We had hoped for some guidance from "campus experts" however there were none at that time, other than the electricians who had installed cameras in one other building, so we were on our own to do the research and develop the expertise. Our system in the residence halls has grown over the years - we now have over 200 cameras and more will come online next fall as a result of new construction and renovations. I have one FT person working for me who manages the CCTV system in our department, with help from a Graduate Assistant. There are also some other buildings on campus now with CCTV, managed by the respective departments. However there has been discussion for several years about whether or not this should be an enterprise function, managed centrally (either by public safety, central IT, or some combination). Still under discussion but not sure where that is going, I would really like to hear how this is managed on other campuses.
 
Jan

 
Jan Gerenstein
Associate Director, Residential Technology
Housing & Dining
Division of Student Affairs & Enrollment Management
Northern Illinois University
815-753-5339
jstein@niu.edu
>>> "Simons, Thelma" <tsimons@KU.EDU> 5:00 PM Tuesday, January 10, 2012 >>>

I have been asked to do a little research to find out how other universities handle their CCTV service. Basically, where their CCTV is run from (onsite/offsite) and who manages it (contracted, university IT, public safety, etc.).  I didn’t really know where to start, so I thought I would ask you all.  I imagine this might turn into a project, so maybe it’s not totally random for this list. :o)

 

Any responses would be appreciated.

 

Thanks!

 

Thelma

 

Thelma Simons  | Project & Process Management Office | KU Information Technology 

The University of Kansas  |  1001 Sunnyside Drive  |  Lawrence KS  66045
Phone: 785.864.0269  |  Email: tsimons@ku.edu   |  Web: www.technology.ku.edu

 

“A woman is like a tea bag. You never know how strong she is until she gets in hot water.”  –Eleanor Roosevelt

 

 

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Thelma:

 

Here’s Carnegie Mellon’s solution. CATV is run through central IT over dedicated cabling that we manage ourselves.

 

Our current programming provider is Campus TeleVideo.  They resell DirecTV service delivered by 5 1 to 1.5 meter dishes and we distribute to campus.  In general, we have been quite satisfied by the service.  RFP for new contract is out now.

http://www.campustelevideo.com/

Scott Bruckel is the head of sales <sbruckel@campustelevideo.com>

 

Thanks, ML

 

Oops – wrong technology! Please ignore – I was referring to cable TV.

 

Good timing as I was preparing to ask about how others provide for their Campus Cable TV.  We currently use the local ‘cable’ provider, Charter Communications (St. Louis, MO) and our contract is coming due soon.  Would be interested to learn how many Universities are using their local cable provider versus satellite or newer technologies to distribute television feeds to their residence populations and throughout your campus.

 

Rick Kubb

Director of Technology Services
Maryville University
314-529-9606

Gander Hall, Room 215

rkubb@maryville.edu

 

We use our local provider (Comcast). During the transition from analog to digital, we worked out an agreement for Comcast to run cable to each building on campus at no cost to us. Additionally, we locked in a static rate for two years of the five year agreement. The relationship is a good one.

 

Regards,

 

James Jones

Support Manager

Oglethorpe University
4484 Peachtree Road NE
Atlanta, GA 30319

404-364-8874 (office)

404-504-1180 (fax)

www.oglethorpe.edu

 

Make a life. Make a living. Make a difference.

 

Yes, I mean security cameras. Thanks for all the replies. I will share this information with our folks and contact you individually if there are additional questions.

 

Thelma

 

We are running our security camera operations in-house.  We have about 130 camera and 5 NVRs.  We’re using the OnSSI NVR software and Axis cameras.  We have recently reviewed a product by Salient Systems that has some advantages over the OnSSI software.

 

We keep 30 days of video for review, but build our systems to 35 to 40 days of storage.

 

Happy to provide any other info……..let me know.

 

Dean Plumadore

Project Manager, IT

Illinois State University

2110 – Student Affairs IT

Normal, IL  61790-2110

Phone: 309.438.8053

www.studentaffairsit.ilstu.edu

Confidentiality Notice: This message is intended for the person/s it was addressed to.   If you are not the intended recipient …..just delete it.  If you received this in error……..don't share it…….just delete it.  Thank you.

 

 

IS there anyone out there doing large scale CCTV using IP based cameras?

If so, would you mind sharing who you use for the back end recording, storage and management?

 

Thanks,

Pete Morrissey

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Our Security group is using Occularis from OnSSI.....very flexible, very scalable....
 
M
 

Milestone

 

--
Ron Parker, Director of Information Technology, Brazosport College
Voice: (979) 230-3480             FAX: (979) 230-3111
http://www.brazosport.edu

This e-mail sent from our nuclear-powered data center.

 

Pete,
 
Over the last year, we have started implementing an IP surveillance system using Axis cameras and Milestone's XProtect software to manage the recordings.  The software runs on Dell servers with VMware, and Dell Compellent SAN storage.
 
We currently have over 100 cameras, but this will be growing as we displace the ~30 various DVR systems around campus.  I love having the ability to pull up cameras anywhere on campus in just seconds using a smartphone or tablet.
 
Good luck!
 
Tristan Rhodes
 
--
Tristan Rhodes
Network Engineer
Weber State University
(801) 626-8549


>>> On 5/30/2012 at 9:38 AM, in message <47FE4CC0B92ADA478ECC286A11E9730118023D@SUEX10-mbx-03.ad.syr.edu>, Peter P Morrissey <ppmorris@SYR.EDU> wrote:

IS there anyone out there doing large scale CCTV using IP based cameras?

If so, would you mind sharing who you use for the back end recording, storage and management?

 

Thanks,

Pete Morrissey

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Milestone Xprotect Corporate software

Dell server hardware and DAS storage. 

 

Quite happy with the solution and always willing to discuss further.

 

--

Thanks,

 

Jeppie Sumpter

Director / Interim Lead Network Engineer

Communication Technologies

Western Kentucky University

 

I’ve just been informed that our Public Safety office is planning to install nine IP cameras and a Milestone management server. My question to the list is what type of lightning arrestor to you use on this equipment? The type we normally use on outdoor Ethernet lines do not allow POE to traverse.

 

Glenn Schneider

Director of Networking

Samford University

 

 

You’ll need to get lightning arrestors designed specifically for POE or POE+ depending upon the camera requirements. As you have already found out standard outdoor lightning arrestors will not work with POE devices.

 

 

~Patrick

 

Thanks Jeppie. Can you tell me how many cameras you support, and what your support model is? Do you do it in-house 3rd party?

I’m also very interested to know how stable your system is and how difficult it is to maintain.

We can take the conversation off list if you like.

Pete Morrissey

ppmorris@syr.edu

 

Sorry for the delay,

 

We’re around 330 cameras right now with more always in the works.  Probably be around 400 by the end of the year, projecting into the 500’s or low 600 by 2014.   We do everything in-house, internalized it a few years back and it has worked out great for the Univ.

 

Very summarized model overview:

·         Unified System, all of our clients use the same system we just do the rights as needed to “partition” things.

·         Our clients for these services are various Univ. departments, groups within departments, etc.   We also have clients that are non-Univ. entities that do business at the University.  Our PD is a client of our services.  We (IT) ourselves are a client for these services.

·         A client approaches us with a need and we:

o   Meet with them to understand their issues and goals.  We work with them to set realistic expectations.

o   We perform a field survey with some custom “tools” that we have built just for this purpose.

o   We complete a design, generate an estimate, and create what we call commissioning documents that show the clients exactly what their views would be.

o   If they are in a position to move forward they sign the docs and we do the implementation end to end including client training.

·         We monitor/maintain the system to keep the operating as it should.  Clients place requests for any changes they desire.  Daily ops are minimal.

·         We are not responsible for viewing their video, that is a client responsibility.   We make it work and keep it working.  They use it.

·         The business model is as simple as we could get it.

o   Startup costs

§  Essentially what it took us to implement it as a pass-through cost.

§  We broke down server and storage resource costs as best we could to make expansion costs as linear as possible.

o   Annual Recurring

§  We have an annual maint. charge per client that is specific to their use of the service.

§  It includes concepts to be able to replace cameras as they fail, pay software maint. costs, pay-in to be able to replace the server/storage resources on a replacement cycle, etc. Because of this client can budget accordingly and do not get hit with potentially large unexpected charges if there are failures.

§  This creates sustainability for the system. 

 

System is very stable for us and easy to maintain.  We devote most time on new requests and not daily ops.  Feel free to shoot me messages direct for any additional details.

 

 

--

Thanks,

 

Jeppie Sumpter

Director of Communication Technologies

Western Kentucky University

 

Hi Jeppie, 
Thanks for your generosity in sharing.  One question that has come up for us is power: do you protect all network components passing the CCTV traffic with ups?  With generators?  We have been wrestling with this one for a bit, and are currently protecting with UPS, but that becomes another issue to manage and maintain; another point of possible failure.  

To answer the original question, we have around 125 IP cameras on campus so far; these run over our network infrastructure but cameras, software, servers and storage are managed by 3rd party vendor :-(  We are finding that like most security vendors (that we have dealt with) these guys are moving into the digital technology in fits and starts, learning OTJ (on the job.)  They are using the ONSSI software, some storage called Pivot3, and generic servers.  There have been a fair number of full days, even weeks when part of their system has been down.  Naturally, they phone us and ask "Did you guys do something to the network?" and we do that dance of having to prove it is not the network because the other side is somewhat lacking in troubleshooting expertise.  Our Pub Safety folks are not entirely happy with the situation, but also do not want to fund IT to bring it in-house.

Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327


Message from rrichman@nd.edu

Has anyone discussed what security (if any) needs to be provided for the networks where the IP cameras exist? Are there camera out there that have some security built in as to allowing management other than just a web page with a local user name/password?

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dennis Bohn
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 7:55 AM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] CCTV

 

Hi Jeppie, 

Thanks for your generosity in sharing.  One question that has come up for us is power: do you protect all network components passing the CCTV traffic with ups?  With generators?  We have been wrestling with this one for a bit, and are currently protecting with UPS, but that becomes another issue to manage and maintain; another point of possible failure.  

 

To answer the original question, we have around 125 IP cameras on campus so far; these run over our network infrastructure but cameras, software, servers and storage are managed by 3rd party vendor :-(  We are finding that like most security vendors (that we have dealt with) these guys are moving into the digital technology in fits and starts, learning OTJ (on the job.)  They are using the ONSSI software, some storage called Pivot3, and generic servers.  There have been a fair number of full days, even weeks when part of their system has been down.  Naturally, they phone us and ask "Did you guys do something to the network?" and we do that dance of having to prove it is not the network because the other side is somewhat lacking in troubleshooting expertise.  Our Pub Safety folks are not entirely happy with the situation, but also do not want to fund IT to bring it in-house.

 

Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327

We’re working with a Cisco Partner on supporting 100 new Cisco 4500 HD cameras on a Cisco DVR system we installed last summer.

The application and camera equipment get daily monitoring and support from the systems integrator and it works pretty well.

I would like to have the critical mass of staff to support the model that Jeppie relates below, I think that would work best for all concerned.

 

Dennis, I’ve been trying to find the right balance on power issue to support the PoE cameras, my newest thinking is to supply power to the switch from two sources simultaneously, emergency generator and street and skip the UPS.  We get traps from the switches when facilities load tests the emergency generator but the switch stays operating.  Eaton’s UPS and PDU SNMP management just isn’t good enough yet to give me confidence that I’ll find a problem before it occurs.

-Scott

 

 

Scott Allen

Deputy Director Network and Computing Systems

Georgetown University Information Services

3300 Whitehaven Street, NW Suite 2018

Washington, DC 20007

scott@georgetown.edu

202-687-5643 - Office

202-309-5739 - Cell

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dennis Bohn
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 7:55 AM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] CCTV

 

Hi Jeppie, 

Thanks for your generosity in sharing.  One question that has come up for us is power: do you protect all network components passing the CCTV traffic with ups?  With generators?  We have been wrestling with this one for a bit, and are currently protecting with UPS, but that becomes another issue to manage and maintain; another point of possible failure.  

 

To answer the original question, we have around 125 IP cameras on campus so far; these run over our network infrastructure but cameras, software, servers and storage are managed by 3rd party vendor :-(  We are finding that like most security vendors (that we have dealt with) these guys are moving into the digital technology in fits and starts, learning OTJ (on the job.)  They are using the ONSSI software, some storage called Pivot3, and generic servers.  There have been a fair number of full days, even weeks when part of their system has been down.  Naturally, they phone us and ask "Did you guys do something to the network?" and we do that dance of having to prove it is not the network because the other side is somewhat lacking in troubleshooting expertise.  Our Pub Safety folks are not entirely happy with the situation, but also do not want to fund IT to bring it in-house.

 

Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327

Camera security was a large concern for us.  We have an access list such that no camera can get past the L2 vlan.  The cameras can talk to the servers which are on the same vlan, and the servers can get past the gateway, but the cameras themselves cannot.  Of course the vlan is dedicated strictly to the CCTV, and access to the servers from on-campus is limited to Public Safety and IT.


Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327


Same here – ACLs on the camera VLAN.

-Scott

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dennis Bohn
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 8:43 AM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] CCTV

 

Camera security was a large concern for us.  We have an access list such that no camera can get past the L2 vlan.  The cameras can talk to the servers which are on the same vlan, and the servers can get past the gateway, but the cameras themselves cannot.  Of course the vlan is dedicated strictly to the CCTV, and access to the servers from on-campus is limited to Public Safety and IT.

 


Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327

                This is a project we may be taking on soon, most of our existing cameras are analog, fed back to central locations via coax bonded with 18/2 wire for power.  I’ve wondered if anyone has any advice regarding replacing the cameras with IP versions v/s keeping the existing analog cameras and getting analog/IP conversion devices at the old head-ends?  I’ve presumed most do the latter as it would be the quickest and cheapest transition (replacing all that Coax seems to be an expensive proposition); but I am wondering if I’m missing some major reasons to switch everything to native IP cameras.

 

 

------------------------------

James Shuttlesworth

Network Technologies Manager

Ursinus College

Information Technology

system@ursinus.edu

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Scott Allen
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 8:45 AM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] CCTV

 

Same here – ACLs on the camera VLAN.

-Scott

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Network Management Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Dennis Bohn
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 8:43 AM
To: NETMAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [NETMAN] CCTV

 

Camera security was a large concern for us.  We have an access list such that no camera can get past the L2 vlan.  The cameras can talk to the servers which are on the same vlan, and the servers can get past the gateway, but the cameras themselves cannot.  Of course the vlan is dedicated strictly to the CCTV, and access to the servers from on-campus is limited to Public Safety and IT.

 


Dennis Bohn
Manager of Network and Systems
Adelphi University
bohn@adelphi.edu
5168773327

On 6/21/2012 8:43 AM, Dennis Bohn wrote:
Camera security was a large concern for us.  We have an access list such that no camera can get past the L2 vlan.  The cameras can talk to the servers which are on the same vlan, and the servers can get past the gateway, but the cameras themselves cannot.  Of course the vlan is dedicated strictly to the CCTV, and access to the servers from on-campus is limited to Public Safety and IT.

We have evolved into a current standard where each NVR (recorder/server) has two NICs -- one talks to its cameras vlan, the other communicates with the central server (BASIS video) and viewer clients.  This isolates the cameras themselves, most are not on the campus network at all (cameras, cabling, PoE switches, etc installed by contractors and are airgapped) although we do provide a vlan through the campus network where that makes more sense, or for additional cameras after the contractors have cashed their checks and headed for the hills :)

The NVRs and central server are on an isolated VRF for additional security for the user-facing services.

Jeff
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Nearly all of our security cameras are network-attached. In general I put all of the cameras and the NVRs in a vlan with a private IP subnet. I then use ACLs to restrict access to the equipment. Barron Barron Hulver Director of Networking, Operations, and Systems Center for Information Technology Oberlin College 148 West College Street Oberlin, OH 44074 http://www2.oberlin.edu/staff/bhulver/

We use a very similar concept, 2 NIC setup, with our “recorder servers”.  Recording servers being the portion of our VMS architecture, Milestone Xprotect Corporate, that does the recording.  Another thing I wanted to mention along those lines was security device load.   We run all client/operator traffic through security boxes but not the camera to recorder server traffic which is fairly significant.  

 

I’ll try to consolidate a few other items I saw being discussed today and where we fit in:

·         94% of our cameras are IP.  We have around 7% that are what we deem as legacy cameras external, high-speed analog PTZ’s that we use Axis encoders to get them on the network.  We’d much rather it be all IP.

·         Most of our cameras encode as H.264 running at 15fps.   Most interiors are record on motion, individually tuned as needed.  Most externals are record all the time.   Most client cameras we roll out today are at least 1280x800 and up to 5MP.  Just depends on the needs/goals.

·         Our servers/storage for this service are centralized in our DC’s rather than distributed. Dell boxes w/ DAS.  Yes it would be ideal to pool more of the storage but what we’ve done has actually worked quite well for us and is more cost effective than it might seem at a glance.

·         Cameras are rolled into VLANs dedicated just for them which security in and out being controlled by ACL.  It is not however L2 between cameras and the recording servers.  It is still L3 to keep things reasonable clean on the network side.  Under consideration to eventually roll this as VRF’s.

·         We will likely switch our Management server to leverage our virtual infrastructure but likely not the recording servers.  It’s not in the plans for the next few years anyway.

·         Our setup sends video to our VMS all the time and we use the VMS to control motion detection.  The BW isn’t as much a concern as the clean centralized management and control by doing that with the VMS instead of settings on each camera.

·         Current admin/acad net standards center around 3750X’s (GigE, PoE+, redundant power supplies, redundant UPS’es, and where possible two separate power sources: 1 regular, 1 E-power.   Not going to claim that everything we have today is this standard but particularly with the power design this is what we’ve been rolling for a few years.  

·         I didn’t mention before that we have one (1) centrally funded position with this service listed as their primary responsibility.  That’s more than enough for operations right now and we end up pulling resources from our other operations for large implementation projects.   Yes, it hurts a bit to pull those resources from their normal operations but it’s what’s best for the univ and realistically our resources as well because we were having to invest a ton of time assisting external third-parties in the past anyway.

 

--

Thanks,

 

Jeppie Sumpter

Director of Communication Technologies

Western Kentucky University

 

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