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I have learned a great deal from watching this list and I am hoping you can give me some direction on how you have your staff track and report their time against assignments/projects.  We have never tracked staff time, but want to when we move to our new project management system.  Will you share with me, and the others on the on the list how you do this?  Do you track in time increments and update time daily or just have a person provide approximations at the end of the week?  Do you track administrative time as well as project and operational time?  Is it worth tracking time?  Any information and guidance you can share will be greatly appreciated.  Thanks

 

Michael Little

Director, Information Systems and Database Administration

Old Dominion University

4305 E&CS Building

Norfolk, VA  23529

 

Office:     (757) 683-4789

Fax:          (757) 683-5155

 

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Comments

Message from jh389@cornell.edu

In response to the Time Tracking question:

 

I am in the middle of implementing a time tracking tool for all of IT at Cornell.  The product we chose is Unanet because of the functionality, ease of use, and the possibility of adding a portfolio module later.  We chose a phased release and have half the departments now using it.

We track time with weekly timesheets on a half hour increment.  Timesheets need to be filled out weekly but we only check monthly.  We are requiring a full week of 39 hours input or more.  It’s up to the individual how often they record their time but most seem to do it daily.

 

I can provide more info directly to you if you are interested.

 

Jill Henery

Project Manager

Cornell University

jh389@cornell.edu

 

Hi Mike,

Here at Binghamton University we use @Task to track staff time as well as some aspects of project management. It's a robust tool and provides a great deal of flexibility in how time is tracked. 

Staff can track to the project/task/issue level and we also track administrative overhead including sick, vacation and holiday.  That said I suggest starting with a fairly simple approach until you can determine the long term application of the data collected. 

I'd be happy to provide more information. Best of luck with this effort. 

Paula Russell
PMO, Binghamton University 
607-777-6364

Paula I am also interested! -----Original Message----- From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group on behalf of Paula Russell Sent: Thu 5/31/2012 5:30 PM To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking Hi Mike, Here at Binghamton University we use @Task to track staff time as well as some aspects of project management. It's a robust tool and provides a great deal of flexibility in how time is tracked. Staff can track to the project/task/issue level and we also track administrative overhead including sick, vacation and holiday. That said I suggest starting with a fairly simple approach until you can determine the long term application of the data collected. I'd be happy to provide more information. Best of luck with this effort. Paula Russell PMO, Binghamton University Prussell@binghamton.edu 607-777-6364
Paula.

We are in the process of selecting a tool and would be interested in hearing more also. 

Thanks

Denis

Here at Loyola University Maryland, we use AtTask also to track our time against projects as well as our service catalog items in terms of the ITIL frame work. We are in the process of rolling that all out in order to figure out the cost of everything we do. In terms of figuring out what to track, we really had to think about what we were trying to get out of the data. We aren't looking to get 37.5 hours out of everyone, rather get the percentage of time that is spent on each service from a macro level. I can talk about that to add to whatever discussions you have. I feel that the tool is secondary in terms of the process and reasonings behind it all. That said though, we are very happy with the functionality that AtTask gives us. 
Thanks,

Scott
410-617-5403



Sent from my iPad

Sounds like a good topic for a monthly call. Not necessarily the tool but the methodologies for gathering the data and the desired outcomes. 

Paula 

I agree

 

Denis D. Walsh PMP

Project Manager Enterprise Applications

Boston College

617-552-8510

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Paula Russell
Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 9:50 PM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

Sounds like a good topic for a monthly call. Not necessarily the tool but the methodologies for gathering the data and the desired outcomes. 

Paula 


Denis, I agree, this looks like it could be very interesting. Henry On 5/31/12 8:42 PM, Denis Walsh wrote: > Paula. > > We are in the process of selecting a tool and would be interested in > hearing more also. > > Thanks > > Denis > >
Message from colleen.nagy@case.edu

Here a CWRU we have tracked time in the applications area off and on over the years.  We are implementing a new portfolio and project system (3rd time is a charm!) and want to track time for the entire division.  The push back we are getting from the operations side of the house is about the benefits and the purpose.  I would like to add to the agenda for the monthly, what people are doing with the data and how it benefits them.  Are decisions being made from the data?   Getting this info from other higher ed organizations will go a long way in our neighborhood!

Thanks,

Colleen Nagy

All,

               When I was with Georgia State University we tracked time for all IT staff for their full time each week. I was able to publish a paper on the topic through ECAR in 2008 with a colleague of mine.  I have attached a link to the paper as you might find this helpful (http://www.educause.edu/ECAR/MeasuringITStaffTimeatGeorgiaS/162606).

 

Randall Alberts, PMP

Assistant Director, Project Management

Institutional Technology

Ringling College of Art and Design
2700 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, Florida 34234
office:  941-893-2054
fax:  941-359-7615
web: www.ringling.edu

Ringling College - Changing the Way the World Thinks about Art and Design

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Colleen Nagy
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 9:10 AM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

Here a CWRU we have tracked time in the applications area off and on over the years.  We are implementing a new portfolio and project system (3rd time is a charm!) and want to track time for the entire division.  The push back we are getting from the operations side of the house is about the benefits and the purpose.  I would like to add to the agenda for the monthly, what people are doing with the data and how it benefits them.  Are decisions being made from the data?   Getting this info from other higher ed organizations will go a long way in our neighborhood!

 

Thanks,

 

Colleen Nagy

No matter what tool is selected for time tracking, if you haven't tracked time before you will have "challenges". Time tracking is a cultural thing and you usually can't change culture with automation. At our institution, we use Replicon Web Timesheet (http://www.replicon.com/) and have for many years (after having used a home-grown MS-Access system in one development group before that). Uptake has been interesting - everything from people recording in minute detail in 10-minute increments to others who pick a task and report all their time for the week against it. The groups in ICT that have some success are the ones who bill clients based on the information. As a PM, I have found it useful only in the macro sense. I can get fairly reliable overall estimates for who spent how much time on my projects, but the data is not reliable enough to have accurate task-level effort, so I don't try (any more). As a PM in a matrix organization where line managers don't use the data in the system, it is hard to push compliance. Reminding people to update so I can do even a quarterly budget comparison is viewed by some as hounding to do paperwork. Needless to say, we don't do earned value analysis here :-). We also use Jira (http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/overview) to track backlog, especially in agile/iterative development projects and for application support teams. There is a Jira plug-in that can track time far better than the Jira-native methods. Apparently it also can track overhead tasks. I haven't seen it and we aren't using it yet, but there is some promise in this for task-level tracking. But you need to structure the tasks at the correct granularity for your organization or else time tracking will be too onerous and poorly done (tasks too small) or won't provide very useful information (task too large). Bottom line for me is, the people tracking their time have to see some personal benefit from doing it and/or have some personal penalty or discomfort for not doing it. It's all about carrots and sticks, and I don't have many of either. Whatever you end up getting, good luck! Thanks, Alan -- Alan Deschner, Senior Analyst Information and Communications Technology University of Saskatchewan Room 56, Physics Building 116 Science Place, Saskatoon SK, S7N 5E2 Phone: 306-966-4846 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
That is such a true statement. The culture in higher education is extremely difficult to change.

Paula Brossard, PMP
UITS Project Manager
UW–Milwaukee

Office: (414)229-2831
Cell: (414)416-7807
brossard@uwm.edu


From: "Alan Deschner" <alan.deschner@USASK.CA>
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2012 10:53:54 AM
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

No matter what tool is selected for time tracking, if you haven't tracked time before you will have "challenges".  Time tracking is a cultural thing and you usually can't change culture with automation.

At our institution, we use Replicon Web Timesheet (http://www.replicon.com/) and have for many years (after having used a home-grown MS-Access system in one development group before that). Uptake has been interesting - everything from people recording in minute detail in 10-minute increments to others who pick a task and report all their time for the week against it. The groups in ICT that have some success are the ones who bill clients based on the information.

As a PM, I have found it useful only in the macro sense. I can get fairly reliable overall estimates for who spent how much time on my projects, but the data is not reliable enough to have accurate task-level effort, so I don't try (any more). As a PM in a matrix organization where line managers don't use the data in the system, it is hard to push compliance. Reminding people to update so I can do even a quarterly budget comparison is viewed by some as hounding to do paperwork. Needless to say, we don't do earned value analysis here :-).

We also use Jira (http://www.atlassian.com/software/jira/overview) to track backlog, especially in agile/iterative development projects and for application support teams. There is a Jira plug-in that can track time far better than the Jira-native methods. Apparently it also can track overhead tasks. I haven't seen it and we aren't using it yet, but there is some promise in this for task-level tracking. But you need to structure the tasks at the correct granularity for your organization or else time tracking will be too onerous and poorly done (tasks too small) or won't provide very useful information (task too large).

Bottom line for me is, the people tracking their time have to see some personal benefit from doing it and/or have some personal penalty or discomfort for not doing it. It's all about carrots and sticks, and I don't have many of either.

Whatever you end up getting, good luck!
Thanks,
Alan
--  
Alan Deschner, Senior Analyst
Information and Communications Technology
University of Saskatchewan
Room 56, Physics Building
116 Science Place, Saskatoon SK, S7N 5E2
Phone: 306-966-4846

**********
Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

I also agree. Can we also focus on gathering non-IT time/effort? I find that on large projects we do track programmer time, but we do not capture the functional-user time and in our projects that can far outweigh the IT time spent.

Thanks
Cathy Ewing
Business Analyst
University of Alaska
907-450-8129

Randall,

 

The article you wrote is excellent and provides several insightful ideas about time management.

Thanks for sharing that with us.

 

Best,

 

Adenor Aragão, PMP

Senior Project Manager

 

DeVry University

3005 Highland Parkway

Downers Grove, IL 60515-5799

p: 1-630-353-7075

f:  1-630-353-9908

e: aaragao@devry.edu

 

www.devry.edu

Our Purpose: Empowering our students to achieve their educational and career goals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Randall Alberts
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 8:14 AM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

All,

               When I was with Georgia State University we tracked time for all IT staff for their full time each week. I was able to publish a paper on the topic through ECAR in 2008 with a colleague of mine.  I have attached a link to the paper as you might find this helpful (http://www.educause.edu/ECAR/MeasuringITStaffTimeatGeorgiaS/162606).

 

Randall Alberts, PMP

Assistant Director, Project Management

Institutional Technology

Ringling College of Art and Design
2700 North Tamiami Trail
Sarasota, Florida 34234
office:  941-893-2054
fax:  941-359-7615
web: www.ringling.edu

Ringling College - Changing the Way the World Thinks about Art and Design

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Colleen Nagy
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 9:10 AM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

Here a CWRU we have tracked time in the applications area off and on over the years.  We are implementing a new portfolio and project system (3rd time is a charm!) and want to track time for the entire division.  The push back we are getting from the operations side of the house is about the benefits and the purpose.  I would like to add to the agenda for the monthly, what people are doing with the data and how it benefits them.  Are decisions being made from the data?   Getting this info from other higher ed organizations will go a long way in our neighborhood!

 

Thanks,

 

Colleen Nagy

We are using Oracle Primavera as a Project Portfolio and PM tool.  We also use the Progress Reporter to track time.  I attached a screen shot of mine just for example sake.  We have definitely seen “cultural” challenges with time tracking.  We have been using this over the last 2+ years and recent reports continue to indicate we average 80% + of time in operations.  We have been exploring the idea of consolidating the operational and overhead to save some headache since we have the historical data that indicates the operational percentage pretty well.

 

Thanks

 

Chris Steele
Technical Services Analyst, Information Technology

Angelo State University

Member, Texas Tech University System

ASU Station #11020

San Angelo, TX 76909-1021

Phone: (325) 486-6204  

csteele@angelo.edu

 

 

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Paula Russell
Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2012 5:30 PM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

Hi Mike,

 

Here at Binghamton University we use @Task to track staff time as well as some aspects of project management. It's a robust tool and provides a great deal of flexibility in how time is tracked. 

 

Staff can track to the project/task/issue level and we also track administrative overhead including sick, vacation and holiday.  That said I suggest starting with a fairly simple approach until you can determine the long term application of the data collected. 

 

I'd be happy to provide more information. Best of luck with this effort. 

Paula Russell

PMO, Binghamton University 

607-777-6364


Everyone,
Looks like we have a topic!
We are supposed to have a speaker for our June 19th meeting - please reply to me directly if you are interested in this topic if the Wednesday July 18th date will work for you.

Happy Friday,
Sherri

We are using Project Server 2010 here at St Joe's and would love to get more info on resource time tracking.
 
Thank you
 

 
I am also interested. Sent from my iPhone On Jun 1, 2012, at 4:05 PM, "Sherri Yerk-Zwickl" > wrote: Everyone, Looks like we have a topic! We are supposed to have a speaker for our June 19th meeting - please reply to me directly if you are interested in this topic if the Wednesday July 18th date will work for you. Happy Friday, Sherri
Thanks for arranging Sherri, I am available to attend on July 18th. 

Paula 

On Jun 1, 2012, at 4:05 PM, Sherri Yerk-Zwickl <shy2@LEHIGH.EDU> wrote:

Everyone,
Looks like we have a topic!
We are supposed to have a speaker for our June 19th meeting - please reply to me directly if you are interested in this topic if the Wednesday July 18th date will work for you.

Happy Friday,
Sherri

Message from jh389@cornell.edu

Sherri –

 

Since we are currently implementing I would love to hear this topic and 7/18 works for me!  Thanks so much.

 

Jill

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Project Management Constituent Group [mailto:PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Sherri Yerk-Zwickl
Sent: Friday, June 01, 2012 4:06 PM
To: PROJECT@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [PROJECT] Staff time tracking

 

Everyone,
Looks like we have a topic!
We are supposed to have a speaker for our June 19th meeting - please reply to me directly if you are interested in this topic if the Wednesday July 18th date will work for you.

Happy Friday,
Sherri

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