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Has anyone been looking at the new licensing model for Microsoft SQL Server 2012 Enterprise?  Microsoft is eliminating the Server/CAL and Processor license models.  At NC State University, we have been using the Processor license extensively, and it has worked well for us.  The new licensing model, however, is licensed by the core, and we will be required to transition from the processor licensing to core licensing by our next SA renewal.  

This is creating some confusion for our staff as I am learning that many don't know at this point how many cores they currently have, nor what future impact this will have on licensing costs.  Microsoft will offer the Microsoft Assessment and Planning (MAP) Toolkit that will help with the transition by counting both processors and cores, but there is concern that when hardware is replaced with newer, more powerful hardware, we will incur additional licensing costs to license the additional cores.

Quad-cores are quickly becoming old news, and that could mean major price increases for new servers.  For example, an eight-core processor would cost twice as much.  Some processors are even up to 10 cores per processor, making the costs even higher.

I'm just curious if anyone has examined the impact of this change on their campus?   At first, I wasn't too concerned about the changes, but after talking with our Systems staff, this may create some issues for us.  In addition to the potential higher licensing costs for new hardware, the licensing issues around tracking cores within processors can quickly get more complicated than just tracking processors.

Bill

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Bill Coker,  ASM
Manager, Software Licensing
Office of Information Technology
North Carolina State University
Phone:  919-515-5419
Fax: 919-515-3694
email:  bill_coker@ncsu.edu
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********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments


For smaller databases we have occasionally used the CAL licensing model.  Has Microsoft completely eliminated this option under SQL 2012, forcing all licensing to the CORE model?

At least on my own campus, these smaller databases tend to run on the same old server versions for years and years, so it won't be an immediate impact, but it may have an impact on costs for any new projects that come along. 

- Verne

Message from mknox@austin.utexas.edu

Verne, we are site licensed for Microsoft SQL server across the UT System so that is the approach we use (same for Oracle SQL)

 

____________________________________________________

Margaret H. Knox                  mknox@utsystem.edu

 

Chief Information Officer (CIO)     (512)322-3774   

The University of Texas System

CTJ 2.218 78701

      

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Software Licensing Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Verne Smith
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 11:08 AM
To: LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [LICENSING] Licensing changes with Microsoft SQL Server 2012

 

 

For smaller databases we have occasionally used the CAL licensing model.  Has Microsoft completely eliminated this option under SQL 2012, forcing all licensing to the CORE model?

 

At least on my own campus, these smaller databases tend to run on the same old server versions for years and years, so it won't be an immediate impact, but it may have an impact on costs for any new projects that come along. 

 

- Verne

 

Message from tracy.raatz@uwsp.edu

I have been looking into this recently too.  We were looking at adding and replacing some servers.  We currently license them as Per Processor; however, these are 6 core machines.  The new licenses are by the core and each license will cover 2 cores (Duo Core).  This will start getting pricey quick.   Upgrading existing servers/cores will add significant cost over licensing 2 Per Processor license and now having to cover 12 or 16 Cores.

 

SQL pricing based on our contract  a Processor license was 1200.00, now the 2 core license is about $930.00 ( so 3 times this for our 6 core machines).    

 

Tracy Raatz

Procurement Coordinator Information Technology

University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point

900 Reserve St  LRC 026

Stevens Point WI 54481

715.346.3773 phone

tracy.raatz@uwsp.edu

 

Our response to this is looking like it will likely be to add SQL into our Microsoft Campus Agreement. Or EES agreement I suppose they call it now? Enterprise Education Solution? I can't keep up with the naming. 

Anyways - In the analysis we've been doing it appears that a site-license of SQL will actually be cost effective even compared to what we pay now, and even more so with the changes for SQL 2012. Not to mention the administrative effort saved by not trying to keep track of every core on campus. 

Evan Levine
Manager, IT
Software License & Lab Engineering
Duke University Office of Information Technology
elevine@duke.edu
919-599-5644

Message from mknox@austin.utexas.edu

 

Evan, I THINK the EES is the replacement for what used to be called the subscription enrollment, so the overall is still called Campus Agreement.

____________________________________________________

Margaret H. Knox                  mknox@utsystem.edu

 

Chief Information Officer (CIO)     (512)322-3774   

The University of Texas System

CTJ 2.218 78701

      

 

From: The EDUCAUSE Software Licensing Issues Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Evan Levine
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2012 11:45 AM
To: LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [LICENSING] Licensing changes with Microsoft SQL Server 2012

 

Our response to this is looking like it will likely be to add SQL into our Microsoft Campus Agreement. Or EES agreement I suppose they call it now? Enterprise Education Solution? I can't keep up with the naming. 

 

Anyways - In the analysis we've been doing it appears that a site-license of SQL will actually be cost effective even compared to what we pay now, and even more so with the changes for SQL 2012. Not to mention the administrative effort saved by not trying to keep track of every core on campus. 

 

Evan Levine
Manager, IT
Software License & Lab Engineering
Duke University Office of Information Technology
elevine@duke.edu
919-599-5644

 

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