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Message from softwareassetman@gmail.com

I want to purchase a Mac app for an internal client, but at present this is what I have to do:
1) Get their personal AppleID username and password
2) Delete their credit card info and billing address and put in my university credit card info and billing address
3) Purchase the app
4) Delete my university credit card info and billing address
5) Have the user log in to the Mac App Store and reset their info - then install the app from the Purchased section
6) Get the receipt from the user for credit card reconciliation
There has got to be a better way. We've spent years tying software to computers, not people (people come and go). Lots of our users already have AppleIDs that match their e-mail addresses here (and we can't merge AppleIDs at this point). And of course there's the issue of sales tax (which is why I'm following the convoluted process above).
At the end of the day, the university should really "own" the app (since we're paying for it). But Apple's model is to tie an app to a user.  That's certainly a lot easier for the end user - and it allows for home use, too....
Thoughts? I'm getting towards the end of my rope here.
 
 
Tom Oscanyan
Software Asset Manager
University of St. Thomas
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We are having the same conversation at my university. There doesn't seem to be a good solution. One that I heard requires that your department have some kind of credit card or p-card. Create a unique email address and use it to create an Apple ID account. Attach the department p-card to the account and have one (or two) people in your organization manage the purchase and installation. Apple software distribution is definitely focused on the consumer.



Mark A. Nicolay | Faculty Technology Support | University of California Riverside
951.827.3555 | mark.nicolay@ucr.edu
Message from tim.cappalli@lsc.vsc.edu

We create an email distribution list for the device to be used as an AppleID. We give the list the same name as the device. So an admissions iPad would have the AppleID L-TS-ADMISS01@xxx.yyy.edu (T=tablet S=iOS). We then put the user that uses the device and members of the IT staff in the distribution group. They can then redeem apps that are purchased through the Apple Volume Education store which are then tied to that device’s AppleID. This ensures that if the staff member leaves the college, the apps do not go with them.

 

It troubles me that there is no solution for a large environment. On the tablet front, we have begun to explore other solutions such as Windows 8 (when they are released) and BlackBerry PlayBooks which allow for secure software distribution at the enterprise level.

 

 

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I would agree that the 'solutions' aren't really solutions. We have been struggling with this at Illinois State as well. It started with iOS devices but now Mac OS devices are just as much in play. We've made several general practices: - if the University purchases the app (no matter the payment) then it should be on an Apple ID tied to the University. The individual then needs to shift Apple IDs as needed at the device level to do the downloads/get the updates. - we are setting up local email alias and creating apple IDs as needed to do this. The college/dept/University administration and record keeping of Apple IDs is inexact and messy. - there is no good schema that covers everyone. All off these are practical: a named individual or a position or a device function (i.e. biolab rm214 comp34) We tried to outline some of our thinking in this internal document which I share if anyone else can use or better yet, add to our thinking: http://softwaremanagement.illinoisstate.edu/purchasing/apple_app_purchas... At 11:28 AM 1/25/2012, Mark A Nicolay wrote: >We are having the same conversation at my university. There doesn't >seem to be a good solution. One that I heard requires that your >department have some kind of credit card or p-card. Create a unique >email address and use it to create an Apple ID account. Attach the >department p-card to the account and have one (or two) people in >your organization manage the purchase and installation. Apple >software distribution is definitely focused on the consumer. == David Greenfield, Dir of Student Technology/TechZone dgreen@ilstu.edu Illinois State University IT - Always Connected 309/438-8334 Normal, IL 61790-6360 fax 309/438-8413 ********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Tom:

 

Does the Apple App Volume Purchase Program not solve some of the problems you indicate below?

 

Steve

 

Steven A. Terry

Director, Technology Utilization

University of Memphis

AD 377

Memphis, TN 38115

Desk:  901-678-2194

Cell:  901-258-5205

 

Twitter: tigersteve

FB: steve.terry1

Skype: tigersterry

 

Message from mtoll@nd.edu

bwah ha ha ha ha

1)      Through the Apple Volume Purchase Program, I can only purchase iOS apps, not Mac OS apps or movies or books or anything else which the University of Notre Dame campus might want to purchase.

2)      As Program Facilitator, I can purchase a VPP "pile of money" in specific dollar amounts ($100 minimum).  I don't remember the other dollar amounts, because I haven't needed them.  When I order that, I get a plastic card from Apple and I actually have to scratch off the back to get the redemption code.  (If only I had a chance to win the lottery by doing this.)  Then, I redeem that code as VPPPF and I now have money to spend.  Of course, Apple doesn't retain the association with a specific card so it all gets lumped together as my VPPPF remaining balance and I have to keep my own spreadsheets to figure out who has a $6.72 balance and who's got a $93 balance and...  I could probably use journal entry transactions to shuffle the money around internally, but tracking this is hard enough already.

3)      Then, I purchase the iOS apps one at a time.  I say that because I haven't been able to purchase more than one app in a single transaction.  After each purchase is completed, I have to download a little spreadsheet from Apple with critical information (e.g., redemption code).  I've saved all those little spreadsheets in a single location after renaming them to have usefully description titles.

So far, I've only made purchases for departments with a "pool of iPads" that have a collective Apple ID.  Because that Apple ID really redeems the individual application.  If this were being done for individual faculty, they would still be able to walk away with the apps.

It DOES solve the sales tax problem, to be fair and balanced. 

And I CAN use a purchase order to order that VPP card.  Of course, the PO doesn't include any info except the dollar amount.  Anything more detailed requires a spreadsheet analysis.

         Thanks,  Mary


At 02:05 PM 1/25/2012, you wrote:
Tom:
 
Does the Apple App Volume Purchase Program not solve some of the problems you indicate below?
 
Steve
 
Steven A. Terry
Director, Technology Utilization
University of Memphis
AD 377
Memphis, TN 38115
Desk:  901-678-2194
Cell:  901-258-5205
 
Twitter: tigersteve
FB: steve.terry1
Skype: tigersterry
 
After wrestling with the poor, bad, and worse options we decided it best for the user to obtain prior approval from their budget officer and then download the apps using their personal App Store accounts. They can then obtain reimbursement from their department. IT is not going to pay for apps on iPads and we are not going to treat the apps as college assets. Any other option that we came up with was going to cost more to manage than the value of apps being purchased.
 
Rick DeVries
Calvin College

>>> Thomas Oscanyan <softwareassetman@GMAIL.COM> 1/25/2012 12:09 PM >>>
I want to purchase a Mac app for an internal client, but at present this is what I have to do:
1) Get their personal AppleID username and password
2) Delete their credit card info and billing address and put in my university credit card info and billing address
3) Purchase the app
4) Delete my university credit card info and billing address
5) Have the user log in to the Mac App Store and reset their info - then install the app from the Purchased section
6) Get the receipt from the user for credit card reconciliation
There has got to be a better way. We've spent years tying software to computers, not people (people come and go). Lots of our users already have AppleIDs that match their e-mail addresses here (and we can't merge AppleIDs at this point). And of course there's the issue of sales tax (which is why I'm following the convoluted process above).
At the end of the day, the university should really "own" the app (since we're paying for it). But Apple's model is to tie an app to a user. That's certainly a lot easier for the end user - and it allows for home use, too....
Thoughts? I'm getting towards the end of my rope here.
Tom Oscanyan
Software Asset Manager
University of St. Thomas
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

We've been able to make purchases (even single purchases) from the App Store by either departmental credit card or PO. Apple's decision to allow us to have multiple program managers has made our decentralized purchasing work very easily.

I'd suggest contacting your Apple Sales Rep to see if you can develop a purchasing plan that matches your model. While it isn't what we'd consider to be a traditional way of going about the process, in the end it has worked for us.

Dave

--
Dave Nevin
IT Manager, Community Network
Oregon State University

From: Richard DeVries <rickdv@CALVIN.EDU>
Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE Software Licensing Issues Constituent Group Listserv <LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2012 13:11:36 -0800
To: "LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" <LICENSING@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU>
Subject: Re: [LICENSING] Mac App Store purchases for users

After wrestling with the poor, bad, and worse options we decided it best for the user to obtain prior approval from their budget officer and then download the apps using their personal App Store accounts. They can then obtain reimbursement from their department. IT is not going to pay for apps on iPads and we are not going to treat the apps as college assets. Any other option that we came up with was going to cost more to manage than the value of apps being purchased.
 
Rick DeVries
Calvin College

>>> Thomas Oscanyan <softwareassetman@GMAIL.COM> 1/25/2012 12:09 PM >>>
I want to purchase a Mac app for an internal client, but at present this is what I have to do:
1) Get their personal AppleID username and password
2) Delete their credit card info and billing address and put in my university credit card info and billing address
3) Purchase the app
4) Delete my university credit card info and billing address
5) Have the user log in to the Mac App Store and reset their info - then install the app from the Purchased section
6) Get the receipt from the user for credit card reconciliation
There has got to be a better way. We've spent years tying software to computers, not people (people come and go). Lots of our users already have AppleIDs that match their e-mail addresses here (and we can't merge AppleIDs at this point). And of course there's the issue of sales tax (which is why I'm following the convoluted process above).
At the end of the day, the university should really "own" the app (since we're paying for it). But Apple's model is to tie an app to a user. That's certainly a lot easier for the end user - and it allows for home use, too....
Thoughts? I'm getting towards the end of my rope here.
Tom Oscanyan
Software Asset Manager
University of St. Thomas
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Message from deborah.youd@uwa.edu.au

With allowing personal App Store purchases and downloads, this means the actual license then belongs to that personal ID. So if the equipment is reallocated to another user, then the app has to be repurchased. If the original personal App Store  Id leaves, they are entitled to take that App license with them, even if they do not take the original equipment. The institution then has to repurchase the App for a new user.
regards
Deborah Youd
Software Coordinator
The University of Western Australia
 
This is exactly right. We figured that with a vast majority of apps in the $1-$3 range that we would "expense" these apps rather than treat them as assets. We have not researched this extensively, but we figure most users will be purchasing less than 5 reimbursable apps per device. In many cases users are not bothering to seek reimbursement for a 99 cent app anyway so it does legitimately belong to them. If they leave the institution and the iPad is issued to someone else the odds are that the new person is not going to want the same apps anyway.
 
We do have an arrangement with the App Store where we can purchase apps on our enterprise account and allow a user to install the app with a redemption code. We don't want to do this for a ton of 99 cent apps, but for the expensive apps we can do this. As mobile device management tools and App Store options evolve we will make changes to improve how this works on our end.
 
Interesting thread. Thanks to everyone for sharing.
 
Rick DeVries
 


>>> Deborah Youd <deborah.youd@UWA.EDU.AU> 1/25/2012 10:20 PM >>>
With allowing personal App Store purchases and downloads, this means the actual license then belongs to that personal ID. So if the equipment is reallocated to another user, then the app has to be repurchased. If the original personal App Store  Id leaves, they are entitled to take that App license with them, even if they do not take the original equipment. The institution then has to repurchase the App for a new user.
regards
Deborah Youd
Software Coordinator
The University of Western Australia
 
Message from softwareassetman@gmail.com

All-
 
Thank you for the great thoughts!  Steve - if you mean the iOS Volume Purchase Program - yes...I use that quite a bit. I see that the program now includes iBooks...but still not MacOS apps.
 
Based on the listserv feedback, I'm getting really close to telling users to go ahead and buy MacOS apps (if they are only available from the Mac App Store) on their own.  They won't be able to do it tax-free, but most of the apps are so cheap I doubt they'll care.
 
My only reservation is that I've worked so hard for 12 years to get people to purchase all software (and Web-based service subscriptions) through me.  Now there will be exceptions...which undoubtedly lead to further exceptions....
 
I'm very curious to see if Microsoft handles this differently with their upcoming app store in Windows 8.  Perhaps there will be a tie to SCCM for distribution.  Who knows.
 
 
Thanks again!
 
 
Tom


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