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Stony Brook University is starting a Strategic Sourcing initiative around standardizing printers as a cost savings to gear the University away from local devices to multi-function devices.  Has anyone gone through this process and could give us some insights about their experiences?

Thanks.


David
----------------------------------------------
David V. Ecker
Interim Director of Client Support
Division of Information Technology
Stony Brook University
S5410 Melville Library
Phone: 631.632.9800
e-mail: david.ecker@stonybrook.edu
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Comments

We’d be very interested in this kind of data at Central New Mexico Community College as well…..!!

 

Thanks,

 

Michael

 

St. Bonaventure is just finishing a roll out of new multi-function devices across campus (19 to date) that will help reduce the amount of local printing throughout the offices.  We did a study a year or so ago with a vendor to determine how many printers (both local and network) we had on campus for our employees and then showed the savings to each department if they could help us drive the printing to these new devices.  This would be especially true if we could eliminate the local color deskjets.  So far things seem to be going well with printing to the new devices up.  This is more of an educational process to our end users to help them understand that the little bit of personal inconvenience to walk down the hall will only help put money back into their own department by not having to buy all the little ink cartridges.  We do allow them to print both “normal” down to the device as well as a secured print that allows them to stop down and retrieve their jobs at their convenience by logging on and releasing their jobs.  We also set the devices to print duplex and black and white by default even if they have color capabilities to help save spending on color prints when not needed.  We are getting some very positive feedback on their new ability to scan documents to their email and thus cutting down on printing/copying overall as well.

 

Feel free to let me know if you have any further questions.

 

Dan

 

 

Daniel Donner

Assistant Director for Information Technology

Director of User Services

St. Bonaventure University

DDonner@sbu.edu

(716)  375 - 2296

 

P Please consider the environment before printing this e-mail.

 

 

 

Hi David,

 

Perfect timing to ask that question!  We are also starting look at that here at SUNY Cortland as well and we would be very interested in what other’s have experienced.

 

Thanks for asking,

--Lisa

 

Hi David,

At Pepperdine University, we exactly went through that process in 2005. At that time, we purchased 90 multi-functional devices from Canon Business Solutions and just last semester, we refreshed the equipment and even right-sized the quantity to 88.

In 2005, there were MANY standalone laserjet and deskjet printers. Even these standalone devices were not standardized. One of our schools had to dedicate one office space for the many different toner supplies. In 2006 or so, we ran a quick query on our institution's Office Depot account to see how much was spent on toner cartridges - came out to be around $140K and that amount was the bare-minimum as we did not include other possible sources such as CDW-G, etc.

As you can imagine, people can be quite protective of their individual printers. When we rolled out the MFDs in December 2005, many quickly expressed concerns that IT was taking away their individual printers. I said "no" but since then, we have been educating users (particularly directors and budget managers) on the cost-savings potential. Gradually and as they used the MFDs more, they took it upon themselves to retire their individual devices. Today, there are still standalone printers but definitely fewer. Prior to rolling out the MFDs, our copiers were analog devices and not networked.

Change is a process, particularly when one's convenience is impacted. Education is key. Shortly after we rolled out the MFDs in 2005, we shared with the community a white paper on print cost analysis, comparing MFDs and standalone. We were just sharing the information with no expectation that people would believe it. In summer 2011, we conducted a 90-day study on print cost with our Finance Office. Our controller did not realize that he had that many standalone printers in his office. The study showed a cost-savings using the MFD. Again, we were just sharing the information. With that information, the controller is more aware of his costs and will adjust accordingly.

I'd be happy to connect you with my project team if you'd like to learn more about our experience.

Best,
Jonathan See
Chief Information Officer

Hi all,

 

UBC began this process about 2 years ago beginning with a RFP and a campus wide agreement with Xerox.  We have MFP printers numbering in the hundreds now, but still have a large number of standalone printers in the Faculties.  Administrative consolidation was much easier.  With decentralized purchasing decisions and budgets, it’s a process of communication, education and change management.  By far the greatest determinant of success has been the education factor and being able to present the business case to each group that has to adopt.  It also helps if you have a vendor that is a partner with you as quality of service is also important.

 

Happy to provide more details if anyone is interested offline.

 

----

Jennifer Burns,

Director, Client Services

Information Technology | Engage. Envision. Enable.

The University of British Columbia

Tel: 604.822.2221

Twitter: @ubcdirclients

 

From: The EDUCAUSE User Services Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of See, Jonathan
Sent: January-23-12 6:52 AM
To: USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [USERSERV] Printer standardization question

 

Hi David,

 

At Pepperdine University, we exactly went through that process in 2005. At that time, we purchased 90 multi-functional devices from Canon Business Solutions and just last semester, we refreshed the equipment and even right-sized the quantity to 88.

 

In 2005, there were MANY standalone laserjet and deskjet printers. Even these standalone devices were not standardized. One of our schools had to dedicate one office space for the many different toner supplies. In 2006 or so, we ran a quick query on our institution's Office Depot account to see how much was spent on toner cartridges - came out to be around $140K and that amount was the bare-minimum as we did not include other possible sources such as CDW-G, etc.

 

As you can imagine, people can be quite protective of their individual printers. When we rolled out the MFDs in December 2005, many quickly expressed concerns that IT was taking away their individual printers. I said "no" but since then, we have been educating users (particularly directors and budget managers) on the cost-savings potential. Gradually and as they used the MFDs more, they took it upon themselves to retire their individual devices. Today, there are still standalone printers but definitely fewer. Prior to rolling out the MFDs, our copiers were analog devices and not networked.

 

Change is a process, particularly when one's convenience is impacted. Education is key. Shortly after we rolled out the MFDs in 2005, we shared with the community a white paper on print cost analysis, comparing MFDs and standalone. We were just sharing the information with no expectation that people would believe it. In summer 2011, we conducted a 90-day study on print cost with our Finance Office. Our controller did not realize that he had that many standalone printers in his office. The study showed a cost-savings using the MFD. Again, we were just sharing the information. With that information, the controller is more aware of his costs and will adjust accordingly.

 

I'd be happy to connect you with my project team if you'd like to learn more about our experience.

 

Best,

Jonathan See

Chief Information Officer

 

Fellow Colleagues:
What recommendations or setup are your institutions providing to students who live on-campus for wireless printers?  How do you have your wireless networks setup to allow best functionality for both the printers and devices (workstations and mobile devices)? Separate VLANs, static IPs, etc?

At our institution more students are bringing various types of print devices onto the network and they have varying levels of success based on the type/quality of the printer, etc.  I'd like to develop a standard recommendation for best practice.  I'm hoping you all might help me so I don't need to recreate the wheel.  

Thanks so much for your feedback, cheers, 
--
Rebeca Stovall
Customer Support Center Manager
Office of Information Technology
University of the Pacific
3601 Pacific Ave
Stockton, CA  95211
Office: 209.946.3965
Fax: 209.946.3971
********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Our policy is that we do not allow wireless printers because we find that they interfere with use of our wireless network and because we want to preserve our bandwidth for mobile devices.

Suzanne Gaynor
Director, Technology Resource Center
Hartwick College
607-431-4670

Message from dnickles@apu.edu

We have a similar policy here at APU, not allowing wireless printers.

Don Nickles
IMT Director of Customer Services
Azusa Pacific University
626-815-3841




We discourage the use of wireless printers and do not actively support them.  If such printers work without interfering with our wireless network, great!

Cordially,
David
_____________________________________________________________________
David W. Sisk    Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services
Macalester College    /    1600 Grand Avenue    /     Saint Paul, Minnesota  55105-1899
http://www.macalester.edu/~sisk/                Voice (651) 696-6745,  FAX (651) 696-6778


Hi,

 

We do not allow wireless printing either.

 

Thanks,

 

Elaine Montilla

IT Director

Division of Client Services

Information Technology

CUNY Graduate Center

 

 

From: The EDUCAUSE User Services Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of David Sisk
Sent: Friday, August 17, 2012 1:55 PM
To: USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [USERSERV] Wireless Printer Standards and Guidelines Question

 

We discourage the use of wireless printers and do not actively support them.  If such printers work without interfering with our wireless network, great!

Cordially,
David
_____________________________________________________________________
David W. Sisk    Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services
Macalester College    /    1600 Grand Avenue    /     Saint Paul, Minnesota  55105-1899
http://www.macalester.edu/~sisk/                Voice (651) 696-6745,  FAX (651) 696-6778

We disable the wireless feature on printers.  They interfere with other devices trying to connect to the WAPs.

 

Anthony

 

Anthony J. Santucci

Technology Support Services

Appalachian State University

Boone, NC

Not sent from a iDevice

 

For technical support, please enter a support request at:

http://support.appstate.edu/help

 

 

We also do not allow wireless printing. -- Anthony Laffan OIT Help Center University of Massachusetts Amherst From: "Montilla, Elaine" > Reply-To: The EDUCAUSE User Services Constituent Group Listserv > Date: Fri, 17 Aug 2012 15:12:05 -0400 To: "USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU" > Subject: Re: [USERSERV] Wireless Printer Standards and Guidelines Question Hi, We do not allow wireless printing either. Thanks, Elaine Montilla IT Director Division of Client Services Information Technology CUNY Graduate Center [cid:image001.jpg@01CD7C8A.A6ED40F0] From: The EDUCAUSE User Services Constituent Group Listserv [mailto:USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of David Sisk Sent: Friday, August 17, 2012 1:55 PM To: USERSERV@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU Subject: Re: [USERSERV] Wireless Printer Standards and Guidelines Question We discourage the use of wireless printers and do not actively support them. If such printers work without interfering with our wireless network, great! Cordially, David _____________________________________________________________________ David W. Sisk Associate Director for Administration, Information Technology Services Macalester College / 1600 Grand Avenue / Saint Paul, Minnesota 55105-1899 http://www.macalester.edu/~sisk/ Voice (651) 696-6745, FAX (651) 696-6778

We don't have a policy against it, but we actively discourage students bringing a printer of any kind.  All the dorms have fast B&W laser (usually in the lobby) and there is a color laser in our Library.


-- Scott

>>> On 8/17/2012 at 12:31 PM, Rebeca Stovall <rstovall@PACIFIC.EDU> wrote:

Fellow Colleagues:

What recommendations or setup are your institutions providing to students who live on-campus for wireless printers?  How do you have your wireless networks setup to allow best functionality for both the printers and devices (workstations and mobile devices)? Separate VLANs, static IPs, etc?


At our institution more students are bringing various types of print devices onto the network and they have varying levels of success based on the type/quality of the printer, etc.  I'd like to develop a standard recommendation for best practice.  I'm hoping you all might help me so I don't need to recreate the wheel.  


Thanks so much for your feedback, cheers, 

--

Rebeca Stovall

Customer Support Center Manager

Office of Information Technology

University of the Pacific

3601 Pacific Ave

Stockton, CA  95211

Office: 209.946.3965

Fax: 209.946.3971

********** Participation and subscription information for this EDUCAUSE Constituent Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/groups/.

Same here as what Scott describes. As we don’t support BYOD’s from students beyond providing network WiFi access , we provide B&W student facing printers in all of our computer labs and the Library, with a color copier option in the Student Union “Copy Center”.

 

Kent Corser | IT Manager - User Services

Main 800.755.5200   |  Fax 785.242.0182
Direct 785.248.2494  |  OU Help 855.268.4357


www.ottawa.edu | kent.corser@ottawa.edu

 

 

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